Low HR Training

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Maff Training and Pregnancy (Read 430 times)

    I am sure this topic has been covered at some point, however, my search is not bringing up anything useful so I figured it can't hurt to put it out there one more time...

     

    I am curious to know people's experiences and recommendations on running throughout pregnany, and specifically doing so with a Maffetone training approach.  I am aware that exercise (including running) is encouraged in the medical community throughout a woman's pregnancy, assuming that woman was physically active prior.  However, my OB's office seems fairly strict in following the notion that a pregnant woman's HR should NOT exceed 140 bpm...and this is where I hit a road block.

     

    I am 27 years old, and have trained with a Maff approach for over a year before getting pregnant.  My MAF HR was 154 bpm, and though progress was SLOW, I did finally see some good progress in my pace and overall feel throughout that year+.  I am now 16 weeks pregnant and haven't ran in 2 months due to the recommendations of my OB.  Instead, I have resorted to doing one hour on the Eliptical trainer 5 days a week, plus 1-2 days of strength training.

     

    See, the problem is, it is seemingly impossible for to keep my HR under 150 bpm while running...let alone under the 140 bpm that's recommended.  I have tried many different paces and environments to test my running (treadmill, track, sidewalks, etc...) and no matter how slow I run, my HR will stay above 150 bpm.  I even came to the realization that I can speed walk at a 4.0 mph pace and keep my HR down, but if I try to jog very slowly at that exact same pace, my HR shoots up.

     

    The past two months of non-running have been somewhat bearable since the weather in our area was extremely hot and humid all summer and my docs had strictly requested that I keep all of my exercising indoors, in air-conditioned buildings.  I'm ont a fan of running on the treadmill, and i find it easy to zone out on an Elitpical trainer so this wasn't a big deal.  However, now I'm really getting the itch.  The weather is getting nicer, I'm past the first trimester where exhaustion and food aversions encompassed my days, and I'd really, really like to get out there again.

     

    i am aware that many of those reading this post will have the automatic reaction of: "listen to your doctor!", and trust me, I do intend to listen to them as much as reasonably possible.  However, it is clear that the doc's in my OB office are not of the running breed and are a little "old school" when it comes to this stuff.  I'm not expecting official medical advice here. I'm just really interested to hear of other women's experiences, and anyone's suggestions. 

     

    Thanks in advance!

     

    -S

     

    Shannon
    C-R


      Shannon - first off congratualtions and best of luck with the pregnancy. That being said, as a guy I have little to no experience with exercising while pregnant unless you count all of the running to and from the store I did while my wife was carrying our kids. Big grin

       

      I would say that physicians are conservative with pregnancy as they are still very complicated even in today's age of great treatment so your OB seems to have your best interest at heart. That's a good thing. Dr. Phil does peek into this forum from time to time and he (as a physician and MAF expert) would be the person to provide the best advice. Hopefully he might see this but if not, I would go to his website www.philmaffetone.com (research it) and reach out to him in that way. He has been incredibly open to providing feedback in here and I bet he has covered this in his research as well.

       

      Best of luck.


      "He conquers who endures" - Persius
      "Every workout should have a purpose. Every purpose should link back to achieving a training objective." - Spaniel

      http://ncstake.blogspot.com/


      Consistently Slow

        Beat the heat to prevent HR rising over maff.

        Run until the trail runs out.

        2013***1500 miles

        50 miler

        Race Less Train More

         

        Ana Trason  "Living Her Life"

        "The Marble in The Groove"

         

        unsolicited chatter

        http://bkclay.blogspot.com/

          I'm curious as to how they calculated this 140bpm HR, was it calculated personally for you? or is it some generic number...?

           

          I can run below 140 HR, but my pace is about 14:30 if I do that. so I never go below 140 for normal training runs. still...that 14:30 is continuous running, no walking. what is your MAF pace at 154? (mine is around 12:00 and I'm the same age group as you)

           

          incidentally, that 140 HR is my recovery HR after hard&long races (short races are different). that's simply what my legs are capable of, can't bring HR much higher than 140 or it will hurt... :P

           

          my max is well over 200. (MAF=153)

          C-R


            I'm curious as to how they calculated this 140bpm HR, was it calculated personally for you? or is it some generic number...?

             

            I can run below 140 HR, but my pace is about 14:30 if I do that. so I never go below 140 for normal training runs. still...that 14:30 is continuous running, no walking. what is your MAF pace at 154? (mine is around 12:00 and I'm the same age group as you)

             

            incidentally, that 140 HR is my recovery HR after hard&long races (short races are different). that's simply what my legs are capable of, can't bring HR much higher than 140 or it will hurt... :P

             

            my max is well over 200. (MAF=153)

            140 is the recommended HR by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. I would follow a doctors orders. A running board is no place to get advice during a pregnancy. Try Dr. Phil at his website or find a Dr. in your area that is also a runner/familiar with the situation.


            "He conquers who endures" - Persius
            "Every workout should have a purpose. Every purpose should link back to achieving a training objective." - Spaniel

            http://ncstake.blogspot.com/

               

              140 is the recommended HR by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. I would follow a doctors orders. A running board is no place to get advice during a pregnancy. Try Dr. Phil at his website or find a Dr. in your area that is also a runner/familiar with the situation.

               

               

              ok, I find it interesting because what if the max HR is only 160... :P