Low HR Training

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MAF and race pace question (Read 66 times)

    So, given that my weekly volume is most likely low.  (And given my past, I'm really scared to ramp it up.)  How quickly can I increase my mileage safely (very conservatively)?  I've heard debates back and forth about the 10% rule but given the law of compounding interest, it seems like this could get out of control pretty quickly.  My next HM is in September, so I don't know if I'm going to be able to hit the mileage by then, but I have another race in January.

     

    BTW npaden, you're correct, the 5K time is almost spot on!

     

    I once read that the 10% rule was misunderstood a long time ago as you're not supposed to keep increasing the mileage so often. it's just that when you DO increase it, the increase shouldn't be more than 10%.

     

    to your original post: if your racing HR is 163-ish then that 150 seems pretty high for MAF. Surprised sounds like you're young with a low-ish maxHR.

    Bluman


      I've only been MAF (150) running for 5 weeks now. starting out at 13:00 miles, but now down to 10:30 and will be really stocked, if this time next year I'm down to 8:30-9:00 miles.

       

      But since I started MAF running, I have really had to change my mind set from "distance per week" to 'time per week".  But, for example, considering "pre-MAF running" training load consisted or 8-10hrs (or 54-68 miles) a week of running, which I was comfortable as sufficent training for HM or FM. Now if we put the miles aside for a moment that, means I was comfortable that 8-10hrs of aneriobic (ave HR 175) running per week was sufficent training. My "MAF running" taining load is still 8-10hrs a week. So what has changed????..... NOTHING.....

       

      Why the instictive resolve to consider this trainig load insufficent???........I don't have the self gratification of being able to say I ran 68 miles this week.... or I just did 10miles in X time.......instead I'm saying I only ran Y miles in X time.....

       

      10hrs of running is still 10hrs of running, isn't it???....Sure is, and its aerobic running now, so it's got to be better for me.....

       

      So, bjoiner my suggestion would be:

      1. Review the training time per week of you previous HM rather than miles per week and adjust your training.  Also ask yourself if you were actually in the 1st stage of overtraining (which often yeilds PRs) for your PR race.

       

      2. Review your race nutrition........If you are cramping it doesn't sound like its dialed in to me........

       

      Also, I don't believe at (this stage) that "MAF running" can substitute for natural physical ability.. i.e. if you can't sprint 400mm in less than 1 minute, no amount of MAF training in the world is going to make you run a 4:00 mile. So there has is a natural plateu that is reached with MAF where your body/muscles can't physically move any quicker.......How close this this threshhold are you?????

       

      This is where the 5k Race Pace comes into predictions, becuase it indicates what your body is capabile of under maximum effort conditions.... HR is irrelavent for 5k becuase its an anerobic race and your HR should be as close to max as you can handle anyway.

       

      If your 5k Race Pace is 7:42 (your HM PB) then your MAF pace is pretty close to your maximum speed, and any increase in pace will start to be a maximum bodily effort.

      jimmyb


        Good post, Bluman. For me, thinking in distance probably goes back to childhood when running a mile or two was a huge deal. There was a good marathoner from Rhode Island named Bobby Doyle. When I was a boy, I remember seeing him out on the roads running, and thinking he had to run at least 5 miles to get to this point, and thinking "Wow, FIVE MILES--that's amazing." Or even hearing for the first time in my life that a marathon was 26 miles. "What? WHo can run 26 miles?" We never thought about the time on his feet. I didn't start thinking about total time on my feet until about 4-5 years ago. I always thought (and braggedSmile)  in miles. Now, I think in time, and miles is secondary. Since I moved to the south, I really have to watch the time on my feet, or my aerobic speed begins to tank. Especially in the summer. A topflight runner can do their 20-mile long runs at an MAF effort in probably two hours. Me, it would take me 3:20-4:00 at MAF, depending on the level of fitness at the time. I've come to believe I shouldn't be running much longer than the topflight runners do, if I'm running races of marathon or shorter distance. I believe the the 4 hour long runs gave me a mental benefit, but I think now that it was overkill after a certain amount of time in terms of actual aerobic stimulus. I've yet to run a marathon since I started thinking this way, but when managed some good times in the heat down here, and some good finishes.

        Log    PRs

          I've only been MAF (150) running for 5 weeks now. starting out at 13:00 miles, but now down to 10:30 and will be really stocked, if this time next year I'm down to 8:30-9:00 miles.

           

          But since I started MAF running, I have really had to change my mind set from "distance per week" to 'time per week".  But, for example, considering "pre-MAF running" training load consisted or 8-10hrs (or 54-68 miles) a week of running, which I was comfortable as sufficent training for HM or FM. Now if we put the miles aside for a moment that, means I was comfortable that 8-10hrs of aneriobic (ave HR 175) running per week was sufficent training. My "MAF running" taining load is still 8-10hrs a week. So what has changed????..... NOTHING.....

           

          Also, I don't believe at (this stage) that "MAF running" can substitute for natural physical ability.. i.e. if you can't sprint 400mm in less than 1 minute, no amount of MAF training in the world is going to make you run a 4:00 mile. So there has is a natural plateu that is reached with MAF where your body/muscles can't physically move any quicker.......How close this this threshhold are you?????

           

          This is where the 5k Race Pace comes into predictions, becuase it indicates what your body is capabile of under maximum effort conditions.... HR is irrelavent for 5k becuase its an anerobic race and your HR should be as close to max as you can handle anyway.

           

          If your 5k Race Pace is 7:42 (your HM PB) then your MAF pace is pretty close to your maximum speed, and any increase in pace will start to be a maximum bodily effort.

           

          hey good luck to improving your MAF and race paces Smile

           

          just a question... were you really able to run 8-10 hours a week at 175bpm HR before? Surprised what's your max HR? Surprised

           

          the physical threshold you're talking about is a pretty interesting topic. I believe most runners are pretty far from that threshold, nowhere near their limits with their running. pretty sure that OP doesn't have the speed limit at 7:42 pace, that's really slow for a maximum speed limit Smile

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