Low HR Training

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An Experiment of One: Tracking MAF Progress From Zero (Read 1501 times)

    Just my $0.02. but I think you will drive yourself crazy trying to warm up so accurately - and so slowly. MAF-20 is a good place to start, but personally I just run easy and let it drift up gradually (without being too fussy about the exact timing) for about 10 or 15 minutes until its where I want it to be for the rest of the run. (I walk about 5 mins first, just to get my HR up a little and ease into it - I don't count this in my time).

    But I guess maybe your way helps with keeping close track of exactly where you are?

     

    Heh yah, I know myself well enough to be able to claim that I would go so stressed out over such a schedule that my HR would actually shoot up if I was to try this and thus make the whole warmup method unusable. My body is not meant for such rigid schedules. =)

     

     

    After doing barefoot running after my shodded runs, I have also begun to notice that my pace is around 1 mpm faster with the barefoot run.  There are some factors that I need to discount:  like drinking water, resting a bit (less than one min) while I take off my shoes, and being warmed up after the shodded run.  But even so, BF running is certainly faster (and much more comfortable), at least for me.

     

    - Ken

     

    Interesting, when I tried barefoot a while ago for kicks, my HR was much higher for the same pace. Perhaps one day I'll try again though it would be only to improve running style and I find that practicing controlled sprinting worked great for that.

     

     

    Anyway, congrats on your progress and good luck to restarting! As for the piriformis issue, are you stretching regularly after your runs? I find that helps me avoid injury.

    kfmfe04


      Anyway, congrats on your progress and good luck to restarting! As for the piriformis issue, are you stretching regularly after your runs? I find that helps me avoid injury.

       

      Hi cmon.  

       

      Yes, that's a great suggestion.  I plan to do some hamstring stretches once I start running again.

       

      - Ken

      Age:42, MAF:138, 168cm/5'6", 62.2kg/137lb (from 73kg/161lb), BF: 14.9%

      Goals:  MAF10k@56:50, 59kg/130lb (32 days to go)

      Stage: Trying to get back to MAF Base Building after muscle strain injury

      My Training Log

       

      kfmfe04


        Soon after I got injured, I started tracking what I ate more carefully (logging macro nutrients) to ensure that I wouldn't blow up while recovering.  After trying various things, I have settled on the following eating habits.

        1. Intermittent Fasting:  19 hours of fasting (including sleep), and 5 hours of eating.  Initially, it was lunch at noon and a small dinner at 4:30, but lately, it has become a larger lunch, with some fruit, and a little bit of food later on, a bit like 1.5 meals.
        2. Macro-ratios a bit like the Zone diet except I reduce protein to promote autophagy (recycling of cell materials).  My average nutrient ratio for the last 23 days is:  51% carbs, 18% protein, 31% fat.  (Zone is 40-30-30, so I've shifted some protein calories to carb).
        3. This way of eating promotes ketosis so is consistent with low HR training.

        I have never felt better - no more getting sleepy after lunch or having low energy in the mornings or late afternoons.  I am much more alert than before, and the fat is coming off the waist.  I will post an updated graph of my weight later, but essentially, I am still losing weight at the same rate as before.

         

        - Ken

        Age:42, MAF:138, 168cm/5'6", 62.2kg/137lb (from 73kg/161lb), BF: 14.9%

        Goals:  MAF10k@56:50, 59kg/130lb (32 days to go)

        Stage: Trying to get back to MAF Base Building after muscle strain injury

        My Training Log

         

        jimmyb


          Soon after I got injured, I started tracking what I ate more carefully (logging macro nutrients) to ensure that I wouldn't blow up while recovering.  After trying various things, I have settled on the following eating habits.

          1. Intermittent Fasting:  19 hours of fasting (including sleep), and 5 hours of eating.  Initially, it was lunch at noon and a small dinner at 4:30, but lately, it has become a larger lunch, with some fruit, and a little bit of food later on, a bit like 1.5 meals.
          2. Macro-ratios a bit like the Zone diet except I reduce protein to promote autophagy (recycling of cell materials).  My average nutrient ratio for the last 23 days is:  51% carbs, 18% protein, 31% fat.  (Zone is 40-30-30, so I've shifted some protein calories to carb).
          3. This way of eating promotes ketosis so is consistent with low HR training.

          I have never felt better - no more getting sleepy after lunch or having low energy in the mornings or late afternoons.  I am much more alert than before, and the fat is coming off the waist.  I will post an updated graph of my weight later, but essentially, I am still losing weight at the same rate as before.

           

          - Ken

           

          This one sounds interesting. Many days I don't eat until 3-4:00 anyway. It might be a worthy experiment.  Keep us posted, Ken. Cool

          Log    PRs

            I was always told breakfast was the most important meal of the day  - i don't think I could skip it even if I wanted to (though I usually run before it).

            I've actually lost most weight at the other extreme - eating 5 small meals spaced out over the day, so I guess it's horses for courses.

            kfmfe04


              I was always told breakfast was the most important meal of the day  - i don't think I could skip it even if I wanted to (though I usually run before it).

              I've actually lost most weight at the other extreme - eating 5 small meals spaced out over the day, so I guess it's horses for courses.

               

              It is hard to tell if the skipping-breakfast-is-bad-for-your-heart idea is correct or if the study has confounded the habit of skipping breakfast with other bad habits like over-eating the rest of the day or not exercising.

               

              I personally tried the mini-small meals over the day for several months before switching over to fasting.  

               

              Here are some benefits of fasting that have nothing to do with losing weight (although it's not hard to lose weight using fasting if you are overweight).  Personally, my greatest gains were:  a lower blood pressure, a clearer mind/more energy during the day, and never being tired/sleepy after eating.  My mother experienced similar benefits in addition to having some brown spots on her hands fade away (sounds weird at first, but if you realize that during fasting, the body will do its best to recycle old cells for nutrients, it actually makes a lot more sense).  There are reports that fasting will scour your arteries and veins of gunk as the body seeks out nutrients.  In a similar vein, your immune system could become more active (stronger) for similar reasons.  So there are plenty of benefits besides weight loss.

               

              BTW, for the five hour fasting that I do, I chose noon to 5PM, but some people choose mornings or night-times.  Other people do it on weekdays, but not on weekends.  Still others will do eight hours of fasting a day.  IMHO, doing some degree of fasting is good for nearly everyone whose health isn't so far gone that fasting would harm them.  

               

              But you are right - you should investigate and see if it works out for you - everyone's physiology is somewhat different.

               

              - Ken

              Age:42, MAF:138, 168cm/5'6", 62.2kg/137lb (from 73kg/161lb), BF: 14.9%

              Goals:  MAF10k@56:50, 59kg/130lb (32 days to go)

              Stage: Trying to get back to MAF Base Building after muscle strain injury

              My Training Log

               

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