Low HR Training

1

Training Volume (Read 58 times)

GregArcara


    Hello,

     

    I am looking at building up my aerobic base. I have done running in the past and have been running around 20 miles a week, sometimes more, but never with a heart rate monitor and always above my aerobic threshold. I have been reading The Big Book of Endurance And Training and am past the second on nutrition. My question is, I cannot find information on how to calculate how much I should be running a week. I don't see any information on the book that explains where to start and how much to increase each week based on my race goals (50 mile ultra to start) and my current ability (aerobically, not much I suppose in my case).

     

    Is there someplace I can gain this knowledge? I am hoping to run a 50 mile race in April of next year.

     

    Thanks.

    jimmyb


      Hi Greg,

       

      The key to the whole program is your aerobic speed, which is your speed at your MAF heart rate. When it's progressing, your volume is enough, when it's not or regressing, something is wrong somewhere. Do a formal MAF test every 2-4 weeks, and keep tabs.

       

      You can start with your current volume and go from there, increasing 5-10% per week in duration (not miles).

       

      You might find you need less volume than you thought to keep the aerobic progress going. Especially in the summer. Let your body (and aerobic speed) guide you. You'll slow down at first to keep at MAF, but eventually you should get pretty fast if all goes well.

       

      Dr, Phil doesn't give schedules as it has been his experience that everyone is an individual and things like the same schedules for everyone can be quite harmful to some, as they aren't ready, or it just doesn't fit their individual case. The genius of the program is the MAF test, it's the best feedback you can get, no matter what kind of training you are doing. That state of aerobic speed will always tell you if something is working or not.

       

      Feel free to ask more questions. Welcome to the board.

       

      Here's a link to a recent podcast with Dr. Phil at Endurance planet . Check it out. He explains it very well. He covers schedules.

       

      http://www.enduranceplanet.com/dr-phil-maffetone-the-power-of-aerobic-training-when-to-do-speed-work-clean-eating-for-athletes-strength-training-and-more/

       

      --JimmyCool

      Log    PRs

      GregArcara


        Jimmy,

         

        Thanks so much for your great answer. I do understand the need for an individualized schedule and the concepts of the MAF test. I just felt that Dr. Phil could have explained a little better in the book how to come up with starting volume. I will save any further questions until I have finished listening to the podcast.

         

        Thanks again,

        Greg

        jimmyb


          Jimmy,

           

          Thanks so much for your great answer. I do understand the need for an individualized schedule and the concepts of the MAF test. I just felt that Dr. Phil could have explained a little better in the book how to come up with starting volume. I will save any further questions until I have finished listening to the podcast.

           

          Thanks again,

          Greg

          You're welcome.

           

          Since he can't be a real coach to you, or me, which means to him being in touch with you in an ongoing process (physically), I imagine that he's hoping we have some common sense about how to start. You're coming in at 20 miles per week, and that's a good place to start if that's where you're at. If you were injured and regressing, perhaps not. If you're a newbie runner, then a few hours a week split up over 4-5 days is common sense. Honest Personal assessment is key, and as a I said---it's all about aerobic speed.

           

          Good luck and please keep in touch and post about what's happening with your experiment.

           

          --JimmyCool

          Log    PRs

          tortoise88


            Greg,

            I started out running 3 or 4 days a week one hour per day but I didn't really see progress until I started running 6 days a week, usually 2 hours on Sunday (sorry God).  I don't know if running more than that would bring even better results but that's the most I'm willing to budget.  I started out at 12:00 and am now close to 9:00 MAF.

             

            Also I haven't paid any attention to nutrition, which isn't to suggest it isn't important only that for me the training alone was effective.  I only have so much self-discipline!

             

            Good luck,

            tortoise88

              Greg,

              I started out running 3 or 4 days a week one hour per day but I didn't really see progress until I started running 6 days a week, usually 2 hours on Sunday (sorry God).  I don't know if running more than that would bring even better results but that's the most I'm willing to budget.  I started out at 12:00 and am now close to 9:00 MAF.

               

              Also I haven't paid any attention to nutrition, which isn't to suggest it isn't important only that for me the training alone was effective.  I only have so much self-discipline!

               

              Good luck,

              tortoise88

               

              I do think that at a very low intensity 6 days of running a week would be needed to see progress. in any other case, 4 or 5 days can be more than enough.

               

              I have the same thoughts on the nutrition issue Smile