Low HR Training

1

Strength Training in the Context of MAF/Marathon (Read 425 times)

kfmfe04


    I know that in general, Maffetone appears to be against strength training, but if you dig into his opinions a little deeper, his biggest objection appears to be if it is not done correctly, strength training is injury-prone (and anaerobic).

     

    So setting aside any conflicts between MAF and strength training, what are some light exercises I can do to balance my muscle development (in the context of marathon training)?

     

    For example, I've recently started this one for the upper body.

     

    I'm thinking about trying this one (squats), but I've been reading that I should be doing lunges instead (Runner's World)?!?!

     

    If possible, I'm looking for exercises which require no equipment (at most, free weights) and will help marathon training as a supplement.

    TIA for any advice.

     

    - Ken

    Age:42, MAF:138, 168cm/5'6", 62.2kg/137lb (from 73kg/161lb), BF: 14.9%

    Goals:  MAF10k@56:50, 59kg/130lb (32 days to go)

    Stage: Trying to get back to MAF Base Building after muscle strain injury

    My Training Log

     

      Somewhere in that world of stickies I read an article that made it sound like strength training was okay during base building for your upper body, but you should stay away from strength training for your legs while you are base building.

      Age: 46 Weight: 200 Height: 6'2" (Goal weight 195)

      Current PR's:  Mara 3:48:09; HM 1:43:26; 10K 43:59; 5K 21:27

        It was in the FAQ.

         

        30. I like to lift weights – do I need to stop?

         

        Weightlifting is anaerobic, so in theory it can interfere. I kept up my upper body weightlifting, with somewhat heavy weights and still saw great progress. Lower body may be more of a problem.

        Age: 46 Weight: 200 Height: 6'2" (Goal weight 195)

        Current PR's:  Mara 3:48:09; HM 1:43:26; 10K 43:59; 5K 21:27

        Shondek


          Maffetone has softened a bit when it comes to weights.When talking about the two week test he says if you are weight training you shouldnt cut out the fruit.

          Those press ups will probably end up giving you lower back issues ..it wouldnt be me 100 press ups!?..burning sugar to the extreme

          There is a thought that if you lift really heavy weights and the rep lasts less than 9 sec ie 3-4 lifts then you are using Adenosine Triphosphate ( ATP )as an energy source which is an alactic  ie no production of lactic acid. .your recovery between reps should be at least 5 minutes.

           

          Deadlifts are the only one I would do(in the anaerobic phase of training),with proper instruction.

           

          The link below explains the different energy systems

           

          http://www.shapesense.com/fitness-exercise/articles/exercise-energy-systems.aspx#adenosinetriphosphate

          jimmyb


            http://philmaffetone.com/strengthtrainingpart1.cfm

             

            This is Dr. Phil's exact views on strength training---not against it.

             

            I do a lot of yardwork that helps me stay in balance. I'll also do very light weights and yoga.

             

            --JImmy Cool

            Log    PRs

            Shondek


              http://philmaffetone.com/strengthtrainingpart1.cfm

               

              This is Dr. Phil's exact views on strength training---not against it.

               

              I do a lot of yardwork that helps me stay in balance. I'll also do very light weights and yoga.

               

              --JImmy Cool

               Yeh read that article before,does he mean it can be done during base training..Although my wife works in COPD and when you mention wood burning stoves she always makes a funny face..

               

               

              Wood Smoke Break Down

              Wood smoke from fireplaces and wood-burning stoves contain fine particles and gases that can pose a serious health threat to you and your family. The smoke emitted from wood burning contains the following:

              Fine Particles: These particles are so small that several thousand of them could fit on the period at the end of a sentence. They reach the deepest recesses of the lungs and accelerate hardening of the arteries, negatively affecting heart function.

              Nitrogen Dioxide: This odorless gas that can irritate your eyes, nose and throat and cause shortness of breath. In people with asthma, exposure to low levels of NO2 may cause increased bronchial reactivity and make young children more susceptible to respiratory infections. Long-term exposure to high levels of NO2 can lead to chronic bronchitis.

              Carbon Monoxide: This odorless, colorless, poisonous gas interferes with the delivery of oxygen throughout the body and may cause headaches, dizziness and, at higher concentrations, death. Those with cardiac and respiratory disease may be more sensitive to lower levels of this gas.

              Toxic Compounds: These include such compounds as formaldehyde, benzene, methyl chloride and methyl ethyl ketone (a wide range of compounds that usually have no color, taste or smell.) Some cause direct and negative health effects by penetrating deep into the lungs.

              Carbon Dioxide: This greenhouse gas contributes to global climate change.

              The above particles found in wood smoke are too small to be filtered by the nose and upper respiratory system, so they end up deep in your lungs. They can remain there for several months causing structural damage and chemical changes to your body without you even being aware.

              Not Just Your Household's Health at Risk

              If you don't have a fireplace or wood-burning stove at home, don't feel at ease just yet. You're heath still may be at risk ... from your neighbor's fireplaces and wood-burning stoves.

               

              Because wood smoke contains such tiny particles, the smoke is not stopped by closed doors and windows, and seeps into nearby neighbors' houses. In fact, during winter months, wood smoke does not rise and often hangs close to the ground, entering yards, houses, schools, and hospitals. Subsequently, areas with valley locations and poor air circulation are affected most.

               

              Gulp!!