Low HR Training

1

Question about "Expose Your Slow Twitchers" thread (Read 460 times)

Dimat


     I was going through there to notice how much people times have increased while running LHR since it goes back 4 years and noticed peoples times really haven't increased much.  Example, people running 10 minutes miles and a year or two later still running 10 minute miles. My understanding as your aerobic ability builds up your able to run faster at the same HR and when you plateau you add in some anaerobic runs?


    Consistently Slow

       I was going through there to notice how much people times have increased while running LHR since it goes back 4 years and noticed peoples times really haven't increased much.  Example, people running 10 minutes miles and a year or two later still running 10 minute miles. My understanding as your aerobic ability builds up your able to run faster at the same HR and when you plateau you add in some anaerobic runs?

       A number of us came to LHR training because of years of injuries. My times have gotten faster because I am able to put in the miles instead of nursing a injure. Am I faster because of LHR  training or more mileage? Chicken or egg question?

      Look at the 1st miles.

      5/9/09  *****13:57 HR 119

      8/5/11******9:37  HR 125

       

      Date: 5/9/2009 6:58 AM
      Type: MAFF TEST
      Distance: 5 miles
      Duration: 1:17:09.30
      Pace: 15:26 / mile
      Equipment: ASICS GT-2120 (red)
      Heart Rate: Average: 119 / Max: 124
      Statistics: VO2 Max: 17.8

       

      Intervals (GPS Interval)
       TypeDistanceTimeTotal TimePaceAvg HRMax HRNotes
      1 Interval 1 mi 13:56.12 13:56.12 13:57 119 123  
      2 Interval 1 mi 14:41.28 28:37.40 14:42 119 124  
      3 Interval 1 mi 15:15.40 43:52.80 15:16 119 123  
      4 Interval 1 mi 16:14.05 1:00:06.85 16:15 119 124  
      5 Interval 1 mi 17:00.28 1:17:07.13 17:01 120 124  
      6 Interval <center>—</center> 0:02.17 1:17:09.30 <center>—</center> 119 119  

      Date: 8/5/2011 3:51 AM
      Type: MAFF TEST
      Distance: 8.28 miles
      Duration: 1:30:50.34
      Pace: 10:59 / mile
      Equipment: New Balance MR769JBC
      Weight: 157.0 lb
      Heart Rate: Rest: 42 / Average: 122 / Max: 177
      Weather: 73° F
      Statistics: Calories: 983
      VO2 Max: 28.4

       

      Intervals (GPS Interval)
       TypeDistanceTimeTotal TimePaceAvg HRMax HRNotes
      1 Interval 1.5 mi 20:01.98 20:01.98 13:22 116 177  
      2 Interval 1 mi 9:36.53 29:38.51 9:37 125 131  
      3 Interval 1 mi 9:57.60 39:36.11 9:58 125 130  
      4 Interval 1 mi 10:19.64 49:55.75 10:20 125 133  
      5 Interval 1 mi 10:27.74 1:00:23.49 10:28 126 133  
      6 Interval 1 mi 10:37.85 1:11:01.34 10:38 125 130  
      7 Rest 1.78 mi 19:49 1:30:50.34 11:08 122 132  

      Run until the trail runs out.

      2013***1500 miles

      50 miler

      Race Less Train More

       

      Ana Trason  "Living Her Life"

      "The Marble in The Groove"

       

      unsolicited chatter

      http://bkclay.blogspot.com/

      Dimat


         So the increase is pretty slow then? Is there any techniques to increase your speed faster at a LHR? I assume once you have your base there is carry over anaerobically? 

        jimmyb


        port-a-bella-potty

           I was going through there to notice how much people times have increased while running LHR since it goes back 4 years and noticed peoples times really haven't increased much.  Example, people running 10 minutes miles and a year or two later still running 10 minute miles. My understanding as your aerobic ability builds up your able to run faster at the same HR and when you plateau you add in some anaerobic runs?

           

          There might be a reason someone is running 10:00 one year and 10:00 minutes a year or two later, or worse, that has nothing to do with the training, but everything to do with other things going on in their lives. Very few professional runners here, if any. Many of us have full, busy, stressful lives and running is a bit farther down on the priority list.  Everyone is on their own journey, and have come to this type of training, and have left it behind or kept to it, for  lots of different reasons. Heck, I'm not nearly as fast as I was three years ago, but there are reasons for that which have absolutely nothing to do with MAF training, and I've been clawing my way back.

           

          Being a runner isn't easy, and it's not a straight line from the aerobic speed you have when you start to the speed you will have when you reach your potential. This is true with any form of training. It can take many, many years for an amateur. And sometimes after a solid run of (e.g.) 3-4 years where you've progressed and made lots of PR's in races (and maybe even qualified for the Boston Marathon and run it), you might find that the next three are really tough, and you regress for reasons that you never envisioned, and it takes a ton of perseverance to keep trying. There are people posting in there that inspire me to keep going because they have, in spite of some serious setbacks. And I truly believe that no runner can keep pushing the limits, racing and training year after year, without a setback or two.

           

          That's my take on what is in that epic thread. It's not a simple story. It's vast and complex.

           

          --Jimmy

           

          p.s. A plateau doesn't necessarily mean it's time for anaerobic work, but it can mean that. It can also mean you are starting to over-train. When life stress increases  beyond normal levels for more than a brief period, it can cause a plateau and a regression, signaling that either the stress has to be reduced, or your training volume. It can also mean your levels of iron are getting low.

          Log    PRs

          bertrand


            I am myself a beginner but i can say now i have no doubt MAF is the best approach for beginners by far.  I completely understand what runnerclay says about injuries. If you get injured you cant train and lose fitness.  I cant tell if there is a plateau yet but as in every sport there should be.  The closer you get to your true potential the harder and smaller the gains are.

            Bertrand

             

            PR: 5k  31'15'' (220 lbs)

            Dimat


               I misunderstood. I thought when I read that you would continue to become faster at the HR in my mind I was thinking faster as in 6-7 minute miles. I don't think thats a stretch to do aerobically but I didn't consider that the 180 plan probably put you at the low end.

               Btw morning pulse was 54!!

                 I misunderstood. I thought when I read that you would continue to become faster at the HR in my mind I was thinking faster as in 6-7 minute miles. I don't think thats a stretch to do aerobically but I didn't consider that the 180 plan probably put you at the low end.

                 Btw morning pulse was 54!!

                 

                 

                the cold and hard truth is, most people will never get to 6minute miles at MAF.

                 

                if you read about the mark allen example, well, most people will not be like him.

                 

                one word: genetics.

                Dimat


                   I'm not sure Mark Allen raced in this zone since it was just one component of his training. I'm not racing regardless but as long as get past this shuffle I'll be fine. How long is it recommended to build a base? I should probably ask that in my other thread....

                     I'm not sure Mark Allen raced in this zone since it was just one component of his training. I'm not racing regardless but as long as get past this shuffle I'll be fine. How long is it recommended to build a base? I should probably ask that in my other thread....

                     

                     

                    no, what I meant was he improved from 8min/mile at MAF to 5min/mile MAF in a year. don't expect to get to 5min/mile or even 6min/mile yourself unless you have the genetics for it Smile

                     

                    you can improve by 3 mins though (which is the difference between 5 and 8 discounting that it is not a linear scale)..that's no problem. say, from 13 to 10. (I went from 14 to 10:30 in a year, well I started at 15 but that slow pace only lasted for one week so I don't count it.)

                    I will also say that that year included anaerobic workouts too.

                     

                    how long, 6weeks is the minimum...