Running-Wizard

1

stupid cold (Read 21 times)


Obligatory runner.

    Gaaaahhhh!!!! Angry

     

    This cold isn't going away. I haven't run properly since the beginning of last week. I was going to run a half marathon next Sunday, but I'm thinking I may skip it, concentrate on getting well (have had a lot of colds lately...) and start my new training plan on June 9th. I just bought it for a race in October!

     

    What would you guys do - would you skip the half, or run it but take it easy? I anticipate feeling better by the weekend, but I'm concerned about coming down with another cold next week.


    Hungry

      I'd run it and maybe take it easy . . . unless I felt good on race day, in which case I'd run it and tear up the course!

      Honestly, I have had, on a few occasions in my lifetime, some of my best athletic performances when I felt lousy and had low expectations going into it. Sometimes the lousy feeling went away suddenly, other times it gave me something to focus on mentally which helped me tune out other distractions.  I wouldn't rule out running until race day morning. If you still feel yucky, but good enough for an easy effort, then take it easy. (If your recovery indicators say Train Don't Strain or lower, I might consider skipping the race entirely.)

      Ok, the "sensible" answer is, If in Doubt, do Less. I know. But racing is fun! Waiting until October would be horrible!


      Hungry

        Harriet, I copied this from the "2013 Sub-3:00 Marathon Goal Thread."  I think you need to ask yourself, "What Would PaulyGram Do?"

        Less than 2 weeks after a DNF due to "bad salmon," he ran a 2:59:

         

        "PaulyGram (45/yes) – 15APR2013 Boston (Boston MA) – Goal = <2:45  RESULT = DNF (bad salmon)

        runnershawn (42/no) – 15APR2013 – Boston (Boston MA)  RESULT = 3:11:34

        SForrester (35/no) – 15APR2013 – Boston (Boston MA)  RESULT = 2:58:32

        xhristopher (39/no) – 15APR2013 – Boston (Boston MA)  RESULT = 3:08:50

        GregTR (36/yes) – 21APR2013 – London (London UK) – Goal = sub-2:50  RESULT = 2:58:48

        Roth Runner (40/yes) – 21APR2013 – London (London UK) – Goal = 2:40  RESULT = 2:49:03

        Oldman (51/no) – 26APR2013 – Country Music (Nashville TN)  RESULT = ______

        PaulyGram (46/yes) – 27APR2013 – Illinois Marathon (Boston MA) – Goal = BQ  RESULT = 2:59:00"

         

        I think you just need to channel some of PaulyGram's mojo.  Good luck with whatever you decide. Hope you feel better soon!


        Obligatory runner.

          I'd run it and maybe take it easy . . . unless I felt good on race day, in which case I'd run it and tear up the course!

          Honestly, I have had, on a few occasions in my lifetime, some of my best athletic performances when I felt lousy and had low expectations going into it. Sometimes the lousy feeling went away suddenly, other times it gave me something to focus on mentally which helped me tune out other distractions.  I wouldn't rule out running until race day morning. If you still feel yucky, but good enough for an easy effort, then take it easy. (If your recovery indicators say Train Don't Strain or lower, I might consider skipping the race entirely.)

          Ok, the "sensible" answer is, If in Doubt, do Less. I know. But racing is fun! Waiting until October would be horrible!

           

          Thanks SubDood! I'll see how I feel on Sunday. I know what you mean about feeling lousy and then being surprised - it's happened to me too. Sometimes it's good to have no expectations.


          Boston Strong in 2014!

            What would you guys do - would you skip the half, or run it but take it easy? I anticipate feeling better by the weekend, but I'm concerned about coming down with another cold next week.

             

            A lot depends on how important this race is to you. Were you training for a PR or for the venue? Would you be disappointed if you had to run it at less than 100% effort? Is there another half marathon distance race you could run in the next month? What does your schedule look like (in terms of stress) for the week or 2 after the race? I faced a similar dilemma when I came down with a cold 2 weeks before the Boston marathon. I decided to to ahead and race because it was Boston and I had put in 4 months of training. I wanted the Boston experience and ran at a slower  pace to be able to run it without compromising my health. (I had also trained for the New York City marathon in November of 2012 and that was cancelled at the last minute, so I didn't want to miss another marathon effort.) Although I was running about 30 seconds per mile off of my  pre-cold target pace, I felt strong throughout and was even accelerating in the final 5 miles. If you decide to run, I suggest that you find your comfortable pace in the first few miles and then see if you can pick up the pace after mile 10. You might surprise yourself and find that your training has prepared you better than you expect. Also, make sure you take care of yourself for 2 weeks after the race-- plenty of rest, vitamin C, low stress -- to make sure you don't come down with another cold. After Boston, which turned out to be very stressful emotionally on top of the physical effort, I felt like I was fighting off another cold for about 2 weeks, but kept up with the vitamins, took Airborne 2-3 times a day, and made sure that I got at least 8 hours of sleep every night and I managed to stay healthy.

            2014 goals

            2000 miles; 5k < 24:30; HM < 1:56Century Bike Ride

             

            Upcoming:

            NYC Half Marathon 3/16Boston Marathon 4/21

            zonykel


              Run it. Maybe the Zatopek Effect will kick in.


              Obligatory runner.

                Thanks Jerseyrunner. It's not super-important at all - in fact, I've let go of the notion that this training cycle was for actual racing - but it would be fun. And we all know that having fun is key to lower stress levels Big grin It's good advice to just start comfortably and see what happens.

                 

                As for vitamins/sleep/recovery, my main issue right now is that I live with a small, extremely cute Disease Vector who doesn't necessarily believe in sleeping all night. (Last night he was randomly awake for an hour between 3 and 4. Listening to him babble to himself, I discovered that he can already count to 10 in German and English! A genius disease vector!) Otherwise I do all the right things: zinc/vit c, good nutrition, 0 alcohol. My doctor says this cold-a-week thing is just a phase and will pass eventually.

                 

                A lot depends on how important this race is to you. Were you training for a PR or for the venue? Would you be disappointed if you had to run it at less than 100% effort? Is there another half marathon distance race you could run in the next month? What does your schedule look like (in terms of stress) for the week or 2 after the race? I faced a similar dilemma when I came down with a cold 2 weeks before the Boston marathon. I decided to to ahead and race because it was Boston and I had put in 4 months of training. I wanted the Boston experience and ran at a slower  pace to be able to run it without compromising my health. (I had also trained for the New York City marathon in November of 2012 and that was cancelled at the last minute, so I didn't want to miss another marathon effort.) Although I was running about 30 seconds per mile off of my  pre-cold target pace, I felt strong throughout and was even accelerating in the final 5 miles. If you decide to run, I suggest that you find your comfortable pace in the first few miles and then see if you can pick up the pace after mile 10. You might surprise yourself and find that your training has prepared you better than you expect. Also, make sure you take care of yourself for 2 weeks after the race-- plenty of rest, vitamin C, low stress -- to make sure you don't come down with another cold. After Boston, which turned out to be very stressful emotionally on top of the physical effort, I felt like I was fighting off another cold for about 2 weeks, but kept up with the vitamins, took Airborne 2-3 times a day, and made sure that I got at least 8 hours of sleep every night and I managed to stay healthy.


                Obligatory runner.

                  Run it. Maybe the Zatopek Effect will kick in.

                   

                  That would be kind of awesome. Never thought of myself as having an Inner Zatopek, but just googled him and it appears his running form was even more awkward than mine, so there's that...