Running-Wizard

1

run 7 days a week (Read 43 times)

northernman


Fight The Future

    What do you guys think about rest days?

    I am at week 12 of a 22 week marathon plan, and I had asked for (and received) a plan with running every day, since that's what I typically do. Earlier this week I visited the sports medicine clinic to get a tender 5th metatarsal checked out. Apparently it's not a fracture or a stress, so no big deal. However, the sports orthopod said I was making a big mistake by running every day. He thinks at least one rest day a week is better for optimal race performance. Googling different web pages gives the same advice. So... I'm wondering if that is really true! If the goal is to run my race as fast as possible, and if the running-wizard is smart enough to give me the optimal plan, then why would it allow a 7 day running schedule? Nobby, what do you think?

      this is totally what I look like

       

      (Sorry Northernman. This is a very good question. I'm just looking for a cheap excuse to use this gif... I suspect Nobby may have some opinions on this topic Big grin)

      northernman


      Fight The Future

        Nice pic! Is that you?

          Yes. This is exactly what I look like.

          northernman


          Fight The Future

            Excellent! This is pretty much me:

            Supersono99


              What do you guys think about rest days?

              I am at week 12 of a 22 week marathon plan, and I had asked for (and received) a plan with running every day, since that's what I typically do. Earlier this week I visited the sports medicine clinic to get a tender 5th metatarsal checked out. Apparently it's not a fracture or a stress, so no big deal. However, the sports orthopod said I was making a big mistake by running every day. He thinks at least one rest day a week is better for optimal race performance. Googling different web pages gives the same advice. So... I'm wondering if that is really true! If the goal is to run my race as fast as possible, and if the running-wizard is smart enough to give me the optimal plan, then why would it allow a 7 day running schedule? Nobby, what do you think?

               

              I'm by no means an expert, but my understanding is that you are able to run everyday using the RW plan when your RI say you can. If your RI show you need rest, you take it. if your RI are all good then you should be fine following the schedule.

              northernman


              Fight The Future

                Yes, I think you are right Super. Makes sense. I haven't been doing the RIs out of laziness, but will try to get going with them again. I find it hard to figure out my resting heart rate in the morning, but surely I can work out a system..

                  I find it hard to figure out my resting heart rate in the morning, but surely I can work out a system..

                  I found a free app for my iPhone that measures heart rate -- Instant Heart:

                   

                  https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/instant-heart-rate-heart-rate/id409625068?mt=8

                   

                  It's super easy; you just put your finger tip on the camera lens for about 15 seconds. I use it first thing in the morning while I am still in bed.

                  2014 goals

                  1800 miles; 5k < 25:00; 10k < 53:00HM < 2:00

                   

                  Upcoming:

                  NYC Half Marathon 3/16Boston Marathon 4/21; Newport Liberty HM 9/2; Trenton Half Marathon 10/8

                    Well, geez, I've been sitting here eating popcorn for the last 24 hours and still no Nobby post.

                     

                    I guess I find the statement that 6 days/wk is better than 7 for optimal racing- and that running every day is a "big mistake" -  to be overly generalized and highly questionable. The point of Running Wizard is to get you ready for "optimal racing" by training you hard, then getting you all nice and tapered for your race(s). You can do this on 4 days a week, or 5, or 7; your body doesn't know what day of the week it is, or how many days in a row you've run. It just knows work/recover/work/recover. The "recover" part does not have to be a day off.

                     

                    The recovery indicators are addictive, btw. I measure my heart rate every morning now right after waking up. It's always the same, but you never know...

                    Philliefan33


                       However, the sports orthopod said I was making a big mistake by running every day. He thinks at least one rest day a week is better for optimal race performance. Googling different web pages gives the same advice. So... I'm wondering if that is really true! If the goal is to run my race as fast as possible, and if the running-wizard is smart enough to give me the optimal plan, then why would it allow a 7 day running schedule? Nobby, what do you think?

                       

                      The advice that the orthopod gave you, and you later confirmed on Google, is probably correct for most runners.  I don't mean most runners training on a plan, but taking into account all the recreational joggers plus other runners that are trying to improve but not following a specific plan.  Your orthopod probably doesn't know your running history and your current fitness level.  Information on the internet?  Generalizations at best.

                       

                      Without guidance, many runners run all of their runs at the same pace, try to run every run faster than the last, etc.  They run too much / too soon / too often, and some of them come on the general forums and ask why they are hurt.  Invariably the responses suggest taking a rest day regularly and not trying to run every day.  It's easier to suggest a rest day than to have a long discussion about how to tell if you are fully recovered, resting vs. doing active recovery (i.e. recovery jogs).

                       

                      You have a RW plan with 7 days per week running.  I'm assuming that there are a couple of active recovery / easy days every week?  As long as you pay attention to the RI and how you are feeling, and adapt accordingly, you should be okay.

                      Future Races:

                      5/4/14:  Bucks County Ten Miler

                        There's running every day and then there's running every day NO MATTER WHAT. I always used to take at least one day off a week because, well, that's what everyone seems to suggest. If however you run within your limits, you shouldn't ever need a day off. The trick is running within your limits, and being smart enough to take a day off when you need to. "Need" can be a result of running too hard, partying too hard, working too hard, or just plain good ol' fashioned not enough time.

                         

                        Doing that is tough, though. Imagine you've run ninety-nine days in a row, but something comes up and it would be a good idea to take a day off. Could you break a streak when you're so close to three digits? Most advise-givers don't think you could, so instead suggest taking one day off a week to be on the safe side.

                         

                        That's my guess, anyway. Personally, I notice no difference when I run every day vs. taking a regimented day off.

                          this is totally what I look like

                           

                          (Sorry Northernman. This is a very good question. I'm just looking for a cheap excuse to use this gif... I suspect Nobby may have some opinions on this topic Big grin)

                          So how long have you guys waited for me?  If I knew you looked remotely like THIS, I would have responded in a few seconds!!  So can I coach you in person? ;o)

                           

                          Those PT or doctors who suggest runners not to run everyday, I very highly doubt any of them EVER come close to running 100 miles a week, everyday, twice a day.  If they had, they most probably would have suggested that the rate of injury, or sickness, would increase linearly as the number of days you run and/or how many miles you run a week.  If fact, if you ask anybody who had, they would tell you that, providing you run in the correct shoes and with a decent form and you "listen to your body" to progress gradually, the opposite can be true up to a point (somewhere around 120-150 miles a week, 3 times a day: if you go beyond that, yes, you MAY risk potential injury).

                           

                          Any doctor or PT who thinks the human body would get hurt as we run more sees a human body like a machine, not a human body.  Our body actually get stronger as we apply stress, providing you give it an adequate time to recover as well (this is where most people go wrong today).  Anybody who had gone up to 70-100 miles a week SMARTLY can tell you that you would actually feel a surge of strength and your running actually becomes FLYING.  As far as I'm concerned, there's not much fun in "plodding".  Far too many today "plod" because they jump to run a full marathon when they are not even remotely ready to get up to a half marathon distance push themselves to run several 20-milers "because that's what the schedule calls for" would "stay plodding", or "run-walk", just to survive those crazy long runs.  That's the only way their body can manage those long runs and, because of that, they would never progress sufficiently.  With the correct amount of stress and correct amount of recovery, our body can get stronger much more than many of us can imagine.  It has been proven that, with AEROBIC stress, body would recover and reach the highest peak of Super Compensation in 24-hours.  In other words, if you're exercising AEROBICALLY, you should be able to run everyday with very little problem (barring life style and family/work obligation, etc.).  If you can't you should look into the amount of super effort workout--chances are, you are working out beyond your appropriate level.

                           

                          With Running Wizard, the distance of the longest long run is calculated by the current fitness level with the longest run in duration and estimated VO2Max.  There had been many occasions that we had to tell the user that they are probably not even ready to try a marathon when their longest run comes out to be less than 10-miles (in 2-hours).  I would highly recommend that they go through a 5k or 10k cycles couple of times before they jump into a marathon plan.  But, of course, that's what they don't want to hear.  Granted, it's all calculation and people can even surpass that expectation (if done correctly).  What we provide through RW is nothing but a guide-line.  But I sure as hell believe it's hell of a lot more appropriate than some exercise plan that only provides that they think the audience WANTS to hear (to make money).