Thyroid Q and A or Running Hot and Cold

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Hypo Help (Read 412 times)

CWRun


    Hello, I was wondering if anyone could offer my some advice. I am in my mid 20s....was a high school athlete and now working as a personal trainer. I have been running my whole life and have always been very health conscious. Over the last 6 months I have gained about 10 lbs, in addition to serve cold intolerance, fatigue and irritability. Last month I went to my OBGYN for amenorrhea (I have not had a cycle in +2 years). Previously, she attribute my condition to the female athlete triad. However, after testing she diagnosed me with hypothyroidism (although my levels were normal?) and put me on synthyroid. She also did an ultrasound and started me on glucophage for ovarian cysts. Now to the important part...my running and activity have really suffered as a result. I am not sure if it’s the medication or not, but it’s been so hard for me to perform at my usual level. Today I ran the slowest 10 miles ever (I’m training for a half marathon in the spring). I am use to keeping a 7:30 pace…today was more like 9 or 10 min/miles and I had to walk twice! Ugh! Has anyone experience similar symptoms? How did you deal with it? How long does it take to get back to normal? Thanks for any advice or feedback.
      Hello back atcha W Smile I'm confused about something -- Glucophage is a medication for diabetics which helps control blood sugar levels. What does that have to do with ovarian cysts?? I think that anything that affects your blood sugar level is going to affect your energy level. Wonder what's up with the Glucophage? If your labs were normal, what convinced her you were hypothyroid? ~Amy

      Use your momentum...keep going.  You know you can make it.

      CWRun


        Hi Amy, Thanks for the reply..... This is what I have learned about glucophage..." Glucophage or metformin increases the sensitivity of muscle cells to insulin.(2) Insulin is the hormone that delivers glucose into your cells to be burned as fuel, or stored. Women with PCOS frequently have "insulin resistance", a condition where excessive amounts of insulin are required in order to get blood glucose moved into cells, where it belongs. Glucophage helps your body to transport glucose with relatively less insulin, thus lowering your insulin levels. Chronically high levels of either glucose or insulin in your blood contributes to obesity, heart disease, infertility, and certain cancers, as well as the development of diabetes. " It's all a bit confusing to me. I think a second opinion is probably needed. I would just like to exercise without feeling so exhausted afterwards! I'll let ya know if I find anything out....Thanks again.
          I'm sorry you have PCOS. Do you actually have the insulin resistant condition so that you need to take the glucophage? I'm still curious how she has diagnosed hypothyroidism if the lab tests were normal? I definitely think a second opinion would be worthwhile. Good luck with that and with your running.

          Use your momentum...keep going.  You know you can make it.


          Driver, Runner, Bestie

            Hi CWRun: I am curious at to the dosage of Synthroid that you are on. How did your treating doc determine the correct dosage when your labwork is normal? The weight gain and the lack of energy is certainly difficult to swallow as running is supposed to take cure both of those problems! Please let us know what you learn. There are some very knowledgable posters in this forum. I also agree that you need a second opinion. Good luck. Kate
              Hi CW - welcome! Sounds like you have a good doc. Normal values can be deceptive - if you are at the top of the normal range with your TSH and near the bottom of the normal range with your FT4, and having symptoms, you could very well be hypothyroid. Women tend to feel best when their TSH is around 1 - but everyone is different, and everyone has their own individual normal range - and that range is actually quite narrow. Sounds like your doc is looking at your whole picture and not just your lab values. The other thing you might want to ask her about is your iron levels, particularly your ferritin levels. Ferritin is a measure of your iron stores, and for someone who is not aerobically active, levels in the lower end of normal may not be a problem. Runners are a different story, and runners seem to do better when their levels are in the 70 range (normal is 10 - 300). Runners can lose blood from their GI tract, sweat, and from impact. Women are more at risk for low ferritin because they also lose menstrual blood. Iron is a very important element in the conversion of T4 to T3 when it comes to keeping up your thyroid levels. If your ferritin level is low, it could also be contributing to your running performance. As far as the synthroid supplement goes, it takes 6 weeks for your levels to get to a "steady state" . If you have been hypothyroid for some time, it can take another couple of months for your body to fully recover from all the hypothyroid symptoms, but you will be gradually feeling better during that time. I can't stress enough how important it is for you to get copies of your lab work. Keep your own file at home, and become an informed patient. If you know what your thyroid labs, would you mind posting them? PCOS can be caused by higher insulin levels - the higher insulin levels interfere with the normal balance of hormones related to a women's menstrual cycle. Hypothyroidism can be a contributing factor because it also intereferes with those same hormones. Did you have a glucose tolerance test done? PCOS also shows a specific pattern of ovarian cysts - were you diagnosed with PCOS based on your ultrasound? Good luck, CW and keep us posted on your progress. Cheryl

              Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the number of moments that take our breath away...(unkown)




              Go With The Flow
              Thyroid Support Group

              CWRun


                Wow...Thank you all so much for the support....I really appreciate all the feedback. In regards to my thyroid levels, I believe my Free T4 was .8 and TSH 2.0 and she started me on 25 mcg of synthyroid. I did not realize it took 6 weeks to adjust my levels...although I have heard it can takes months to find the correct dosage. She determined PCOS from my ultrasound. Interestingly, I do not have the classic symptoms of PCOS (high BMI and facial hair, acne, etc.) except for irregular/no periods. I am not sure if she tested my glucose or not...I have had quite a few blood tests done with the last few weeks and I'm losing track. However, I am now on 1500 mg of glucophage. That is a great suggestion to get copies of my lab work. I do trust my OB however I feel like I am just a file or number to her sometime because she is so busy. The nurse who called with my lab results could not answer any of my questions and my doctor was not available to explain the diagnosis or results to me...that is the most frustrating part of all this! Anyways...thanks again to everyone. I feel so much better knowing there are supportive, knowledgeable women out there Smile