Trailer Trash

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100-Miler questions (Read 82 times)

mtwarden


running under the BigSky

    For the folks that have a life, real or imagined:

     

    "The Low Key Approach to a Trail 100-Mile", Jeff Hagen, UltraRunning, March, 1987

     

    available via e-mail

     

    John- you have this available e-mail or it's available e-mail somewhere else?

     

    thanks

     

    Mike

                                                               2014 

    HURL Fat Ass 50k  1/11- DNS sick :(

    Zion Traverse 47 miles 4/5 DNS :( stress fracture in heel

    Don't Fence Me In 30k  14k 5/10 ✓

    Pengelly Double Dip 13.1 miles & 3000' 6/7 ✓

    Devils Backbone 50 mile (I'm running 25 as a two person relay) 7/19 ✓ Wow!

    Ellkhorn 23k 8/2- this is a maybe- little close to the Bridger???? signed up :)  ✓ 

    Bridge Ridge Run 20 miles 8/9  ✓ 


    Uh oh... now what?

      Is inside the black box just to my left.

       

      Computer > Ezmeralda (DSmile > Hagen_walking\Hagen_Kline.pdf  (stupid smiley face is a colon).

       

      It is from UltraRunning, March, 1987 -- I doubt if it is archived anywhere.


      Refurbished Hip

        Jamie, you don't need to have run an ultra or have paced before to be a good pacer!

          Jamie, you don't need to have run an ultra or have paced before to be a good pacer!

           

          All you really need to do is read this helpful guide!

           

          http://footfeathers.blogspot.com/2012/06/how-to-be-ultra-pacer.html

          mtwarden


          running under the BigSky

            Is inside the black box just to my left.

             

            Computer > Ezmeralda (DSmile > Hagen_walking\Hagen_Kline.pdf  (stupid smiley face is a colon).

             

            It is from UltraRunning, March, 1987 -- I doubt if it is archived anywhere.

             

            John -sent you a message w/ my email if you're able to forward the pdf- thanks

             

            Mike

                                                                       2014 

            HURL Fat Ass 50k  1/11- DNS sick :(

            Zion Traverse 47 miles 4/5 DNS :( stress fracture in heel

            Don't Fence Me In 30k  14k 5/10 ✓

            Pengelly Double Dip 13.1 miles & 3000' 6/7 ✓

            Devils Backbone 50 mile (I'm running 25 as a two person relay) 7/19 ✓ Wow!

            Ellkhorn 23k 8/2- this is a maybe- little close to the Bridger???? signed up :)  ✓ 

            Bridge Ridge Run 20 miles 8/9  ✓ 


            Uh oh... now what?

              Another thing...

               

              The ease of stopping can be distracting, intrusive, and several other things with nothing positive in their aura.

               

              The Leadville Trail 100 is an out-and-back course.  The turnaround is at Winfield.  We saw

              Winfield when we went to the training weekend in late June (the first visit).  The training

              group had ran from Twin Lakes to Winfield and back--the famed double-cross of Hope

              Pass (12,660 elevation), 21 miles round trip.  Kathy and I drove out there the next day so

              she could be familiar with the road (I was running alone that year.  We would try it together

              the following year.)  We looked at the remnants of the town that was Winfield many years

              gone by, ate a sandwich, enjoyed the gurgle of a creek, and the overall quiet of a high

              Rockies valley.  We thought about how busy it would be there in August.

               

              When we got home we looked at a lot of pictures.  Winfield was a mess of cars, tents,

              and banners--a carnival on race day.  Kathy saw it and said it first.  "That looks like a

              finish line," she said somberly,  "I should not be there.  If you want to drop, you have to

              get back to Twin Lakes."  I was in full agreement.  Those pictures and all the hoopla

              was finish line atmosphere pure and simple.  That was one aid station I needed to get in,

              grab whatever, and get out, get back to the trail. 

               

              Later we would look at LT100 statistics--yup, most drops are at Winfield.

               

              At the starting line we heard many voices about how easy it will be to drop at Winfield.

               

               In August, Kathy waited at Twin Lakes.  I had no option, but to get back over Hope Pass.

               

              When you leave the starting line, no matter where that might be, don't leave with the

              idea of dropping at Winfield... or any other intermediate point.  The only thing that is to

              be on your mind is the finish line.  If the DNF is to occur, let it come swooping in on its

              black wings and put an end to your misery, but don't drop because you have reached a

              convenient place somewhere along the way.

               

              Get into the aid station, get what you stopped for, get out of the aid station.  Pause out

              there in your own loneliness of the woods or canyons; commune and commiserate with

              a rock, tree, or vulture, but get back on the course and continue until someone official

              says it is time to stop--race officials are very good at that.

               

              rgot

              FTYC


              Faster Than Your Couch!

                Thanks, John, for the low-key-approach files, it was great to read. So soothing to know that you don't need to have all the latest equipment and have trained with the latest training plan, and can still be successful. It removes a lot of the "external" pressure and makes you more rely on your confidence in yourself and your will to persevere. I still think the guy has some extraordinary physical capability, going 100 miles on much less training than what's usually done, but the approach seems sound and proven.

                 

                +1 on the aid stations with finish-line atmosphere. I stay away from them as much as possible. Their aura, combined with the prospective of a grueling next section, makes it too easy to drop. I also prefer to be "left alone for dead" by my crew at such aid stations, just forcing me to continue on.

                Run for fun.

                XtremeTaper


                   

                  +1 on the aid stations with finish-line atmosphere. I stay away from them as much as possible. Their aura, combined with the prospective of a grueling next section, makes it too easy to drop. I also prefer to be "left alone for dead" by my crew at such aid stations, just forcing me to continue on.

                   

                  Couch, Oil Creek is a multiple loop course plus some sort of out/back at the end for the 100 milers I think. So you will need to brace yourself for that finish line several times. But you probably already know that.

                  Trapped in the night, moving alone, caught in a world of glass and stone...

                  Down to skin and bone.

                   

                  Watoni


                    Not that I have run 100 (or even 50 yet), but I find that when I am really suffering just making it to the next aid station, rest stop, next climb works. On my Dolomites trip it was one day at a time, then once climb at a time, sometimes one km at a time. I never got into the van, and many people did who were in much better shape than I.

                     

                    We will see how it works running ...

                    cowboyjunkie


                      what John M. says. good stuff. he likely doesn't know this, but his words helped me through my first 100. and they have come back to me during other 100's.

                       

                      i know he said something about deciding ahead of time what is going to make you drop. for me it's only if my health is in danger and that has never happened. though, in weakness, i have dropped for lesser reasons. loop courses tempt you that way.

                      FTYC


                      Faster Than Your Couch!

                        Taper, cowboy: I am aware of the loop course, and in a way, I dread it. Toward the end of the second loop, my strategy will be to just run through the aid station and get on with the race. Perhaps I'll pick up my pacer already in the middle of the second loop (if permitted, anyone know?), and just exchange him/her for a new, fresh pacer (ha, that sounds too good! Big grin) for the last loop or last half loop plus the mini-loop.

                         

                        Watoni: I have used the "one section at a time" approach, too, and it seems to work well for me. Once I reach the "goal", I have my mind already set on the next goal and usually don't even see the chairs at the aid stations. And once I have set out, I don't turn back, even if I forgot something (unless it's essential), forcing myself to just deal with it and carry on to the next AS.

                        Run for fun.

                        Sandy-2


                          Hi FTYC,

                           

                          I’m no professional, but here are my 2 cents.  Sorry it took me so long to chime in.

                           

                          - How many miles per week for what period did you run before your first 100 (is this different from the next 100-milers)?

                           

                          I’m kind of a low-key, low-mileage 100 miler (does that make sense?), everyone is different, but I’m usually in the 50 to 60 miles per week range.  But I will also mix in a 50 miler, some 50ks, maybe a marathon and do back-2-back 20 milers. I do this “peak training” over about 4 or 5 months.

                           

                          - In how much pain (physically, from "overuse" or from the exhaustion) were you after the run, and how long did it take to recover from that?

                           

                          I think this depends on how much you “push” during the run, but in general it’s no worse than a 50 miler.  It only takes a few days after to feel “normal” again, but it takes a while longer for your running to get back to “normal.”

                           

                          - What is more challenging, the distance (physical exhaustion), or the mental barrier? (and what, specifically, was your greatest mental obstacle?)

                           

                          I think that if you are mentally positive you can make up for some of the physical.  Like JohnM and other have said, mentally it’s best to think about the finish and don’t let any thinking about dropping earlier creep in.  On a loop course it’s best to make up little packages/bottles for each loop and then switch out any leftovers with the new package/bottles and get outta there as quickly as possible.

                           

                          - How much night running before the race do you recommend? Weekly? How long, when in the night?

                           

                          I’ll do a few night runs, but not on a regular basis.  Once you figure out the lights and carrying other stuff a few nighttime runs should be enough.  You should hook up with a running buddy so it’s not so overwhelming, especially for the first few times out.

                           

                          - Is warm food better in the night, or just the same ol' stuff that you take during the day?

                           

                          I like to mostly eat stuff that I bring myself (gels, cookies, shotblocks, etc.), but then look at the aid station tables to fill in the gaps.  I will add that there is nothing like warm potato soup in the middle of the night.

                           

                          By the way, I have also sent you a PM on this.

                           

                          Good luck and go for it !!!!!

                           

                          Sandy

                          tbd


                          Ultra Cowboy

                            Jamie, you don't need to have run an ultra or have paced before to be a good pacer!

                             

                            MM and Birdwell, Thanks for this reassurance...

                             

                            I'd consider it an honor to pace a 100 miler, but I have no interest in doing one myself.

                            I'm going to need the mental and physical fortitude described in this thread for my next 50k methinks.

                            I'm a rambler, I'm a gambler, I'm a green lumber handler, I'm a gypo from Pelican Bay....

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