Trailer Trash

12

How Cold is Too Cold for You? (Read 46 times)

FreeSoul87


Runs4Sanity

     Winter is here already for some, and on it's way for others so I thought I'd see what some feel is too cold for them. We love trails, so it makes sense that we'll do just about whatever it takes to run outside in whatever weather - but what is too cold for you? Are you willing to layer up and get out there in temps that keep even the toughest animals "inside"? Do you have a TM at home or a gym for those "just in case" days?

    *Do It For Yourself, Do It Because They Said It Was Impossible, Do It Because They Said You Were Incapable*

    PRs

    5k - 24:40 (7:57 min/mile pace) 

    10k - 54:39 (8:48 min/mile pace)

    15k -1:24:04 (9:01 min/mile pace)

    13.1 - 1:56:38 (8:54 min/mile pace) Sub 2 hours!!!

     

    Gator eye


      I picked below zero but it really depends on the wind, I ve run in below zero weather with no wind and I turned around in 20 degree's with a solid wind.

      FreeSoul87


      Runs4Sanity

        I should have put something about wind damn it, windchill does make a HUGE difference, shoot.

         

        I picked below zero but it really depends on the wind, I ve run in below zero weather with no wind and I turned around in 20 degree's with a solid wind.

        *Do It For Yourself, Do It Because They Said It Was Impossible, Do It Because They Said You Were Incapable*

        PRs

        5k - 24:40 (7:57 min/mile pace) 

        10k - 54:39 (8:48 min/mile pace)

        15k -1:24:04 (9:01 min/mile pace)

        13.1 - 1:56:38 (8:54 min/mile pace) Sub 2 hours!!!

         

          I've run in weather down to -20°F and it didn't really bother me, even though it was windy.  That said, I was wearing lots of layers and a balaclava mask, which of course iced up.  One cool side effect of running in really cold weather, especially at night (I'm an "after work" runner), is that after a while your eyelashes ice up, and when you run past a street light, you see some pretty interesting rainbows.  Smile

          SillyC


            Yeah, you didn't include -15F below, that's my cutoff.  Didn't realize there were those of us making that decision?

             

            Shipo is right - when you are looking at subzero temperatures, your eyelashes freeze up.

            Below about +15 you start having to take a bit more care of your skin.  Exposed ankles and such.

             

            I WILL think really hard about which trails are a good idea when it's around the zero mark, though - if it's 4 degrees outside, and you fall and can't get out of the forest quickly, you could die out there.  When it's that cold, there's a trail that I'll use that's close to a road and well traveled.  If the trails are open at all with the snow situation.

            FreeSoul87


            Runs4Sanity

              Blush sorry, I am not really used to seeing below 0 temps where I am.... so I thought if I put below 0 that would leave it open to whatever temps others experience and then of course the choice that you'll be out there even if it kills you. I honestly don't remember the coldest I've ran in, maybe 14 degrees with sleet and snow....... but I would have to look it up.

              *Do It For Yourself, Do It Because They Said It Was Impossible, Do It Because They Said You Were Incapable*

              PRs

              5k - 24:40 (7:57 min/mile pace) 

              10k - 54:39 (8:48 min/mile pace)

              15k -1:24:04 (9:01 min/mile pace)

              13.1 - 1:56:38 (8:54 min/mile pace) Sub 2 hours!!!

               

              LB2


                Rarely, will we see temps into the teens here in Louisiana, but I have seen it before. That does not really bother me nearly as much as the heat. I really like running in cold weather.

                LB2


                Uh oh... now what?

                  Somewhere in North Dakota...

                    Our normal winters are in the 0 to +20F range, but do get temps down to -20F and very rarely -30F. Temperatures are rarely the cause for not running, but may be cause for adjusting how far and where to run - at least for me. Many of my friends do the winter ultras, including over 100miles, so they'll be out in most anything.

                     

                    Of more concern can be wind (the kind that blows big trees down) or freezing rain (the kind that makes roads really dangerous - "don't travel if you don't have to").  While studs are useful on shoes, the really slick ice can cause a weird gait, which isn't usually helpful. (yes, we've got a major ice storm - as forecasted - but had good runs the last couple days)

                     

                    We get really unhappy when we've got little snow, subzero F temps, then it warms and has freezing rain. That's when things are dangerous.

                     

                    MTA: Last night we were discussing what a PITA +40F can be in winter. (= ice and dangerous roads, overflow, etc)

                    "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog

                      Rarely, will we see temps into the teens here in Louisiana, but I have seen it before. That does not really bother me nearly as much as the heat. I really like running in cold weather.

                       

                      +1

                       

                      Yup, I'm much more afraid of the heat than I am of the cold.  Fortunately here in New Hamster we typically get only three to four weeks of intense heat and humidity per year*.  When the weather gets like that I switch to a heavily wooded trail which has very little foot traffic.  Why?  Because because of all of the extra shade, and because I hydrate like crazy before I go out and need to take lots of bio-breaks.  Blush

                       

                      * Intense heat and humidity around here qualifies as pretty much anything over 80°F with humidity over 50%; we do occasionally see temperatures north of 90°F, and once or twice in the last 11 years we saw temperatures a hair over 100°F.

                        Last night we were discussing what a PITA +40F can be in winter. (= ice and dangerous roads, overflow, etc)

                         

                        What I find annoying about +40°F when there is ice hidden below snow on the trails, is that my shoe spikes/YakTrax get impacted with heavy snow and become worthless.  I had a nasty trail run a few years back where I fell, hard, six times in three miles; I turned around and walked my bruised backside back to my car.  Even then I fell twice more before I got off the trail.  Angry

                           

                          What I find annoying about +40°F when there is ice hidden below snow on the trails, is that my shoe spikes/YakTrax get impacted with heavy snow and become worthless.  I had a nasty trail run a few years back where I fell, hard, six times in three miles; I turned around and walked my bruised backside back to my car.  Even then I fell twice more before I got off the trail.  Angry

                          Have you tried Kahtoola microspikes? Their teeth are long enough to get through some snow, then grab the ice (depending upon how hard) or more compact snow underneath. Assuming you've got the old coil yaktrax, they just slide over ice - nothing sharp to grab.The microspikes work best if there's something to grab onto. Like yesterday, I was on a trail with no base yet, just some used snow, and it wasn't  much fun. Then I headed partway up the mountain trail - single track, heavily packed but not icy - and it was great. (That mtn was above our last freezing rain so decent snow, but it might be catching today's forecasted freezing rain, which is why I milked yesterday for what I could get out of it. It's supposed to go back to snow again later today or tomorrow.)

                           

                          Under certain snow and temperature conditions, cleats / spikes sometimes accumulate snow. Spraying the metal with cooking spray (PAM) helps reduce the buildup - no guarantee to stop completely, but it's a heck of a lot better than the snowballs that accumulate underfoot otherwise.

                          "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog


                          Uh oh... now what?

                            ...Yup, I'm much more afraid of the heat than I am of the cold.  Fortunately here in New Hamster we typically get only three to four weeks of intense heat and humidity per year*.  When the weather gets like that I switch to a heavily wooded trail which has very little foot traffic.  Why?  Because because of all of the extra shade, and because I hydrate like crazy before I go out and need to take lots of bio-breaks.  Blush

                            ... 

                            * Intense heat and humidity around here qualifies as pretty much anything over 80°F with humidity over 50%; we do occasionally see temperatures north of 90°F, and once or twice in the last 11 years we saw temperatures a hair over 100°F.

                             

                            If it is hot, you can get through it by slowing down, pausing even, and then continuing.  You might not be running, but you can usually keep going.

                             

                            If it is cold, if you stop or slow down considerably, you just might be dead.  I am more concerned with cold than with heat.

                            jamezilla


                            Follower of Forrest

                              I don't know in degrees, but I know it when I feel it.

                              6/21 - Manitou's Revenge 54mi

                               

                              A man may never run the same trail twice for it is not the same trail and he is not the same man


                               

                              Chnaiur


                                I should have put something about wind damn it, windchill does make a HUGE difference, shoot.

                                 

                                 

                                For me it doesn't. I'm concerned with the damage cold air does to my lungs. My skin I can always cover up, and I can add layers to be comfortably warm.

                                3/8 Way Too Cool 50k WNS

                                4/19 Tehama Wildflowers 50k

                                 

                                12