Trailer Trash

1

Febapple Frozen 50 RR-a day to forget (Read 45 times)

    This weekend did not go as planned and it has left me questioning whether or not I'm cut out for ultra running.

    The Febapple Frozen 50 is a ten mile loop in a figure eight with the start in the middle of the eight. They had a ten, twenty, 50k, and 50 mile option starting at different times. 300 runners between all the races. The elevation gain per loop was about 600 ft so it was runnable minus two or three hills. The course was marked very well, super easy to navigate. Well put on race with good swag and reasonably priced.

    I  was running the 50 miler and super excited for this race. My plan was to take it easy and just use it for some prep for my 100 miler in April. I've been putting in 60 - 75 mile weeks since I started back up at the end of December. My past three Saturday's were runs of 26, 31, 31 (most recent). No taper because like I said, training run not race.

    The weather called for temps in the high 30s and rain all day. I checked the website early in the week and the RD posted a note saying he ran a loop and 80% of the course was covered in a sheet of ice and to expect your times to be a lot slower.  No joke it was an inch and a half sheet with divots.

    Got started at 7 and tucked in behind some dude with a wicked cool beard (looked familiar from laces's RR photos, think his name was Leon). The first section of the figure eight is about 4 miles. The ice was manageable but I was sliding a lot and using a bunch of energy by tensing up and keeping stable. One small section of downhill had a sharp 45 degree turn at the bottom and was covered in nothing but ice. Mess up here and you went over a cliff. This section went by fast and I was back to the middle of the 8. I didn't stop because I had my AK Pack and was fueling with perpetuem (2 scoops a loop).

    The other side of the course was about six miles and while just as icy it was rolling terrain and easy to run. There is another aid station midway through but again I didn't stop. Did I mention the ice? It was pretty bad here but there was a cool frozen water fall to look at. I kept telling myself to grab my camera for the next loop but I always forgot. First loop down in 1:45.

    Felt good about my first loop. The second was much of the same and I finished in 1:44. The loop starts with about a mile on asphalt. As soon as I hit the trail going downhill for my third loop everything went to shit. Not sure how it got so bad so quickly but my legs started getting tighter and tighter. Runners from the shorter races were zipping by me on their first loops and I was not happy.

    I wasn't sure what was wrong. I had drank about 4 scoops of perpetuem at this point and was drinking water/heed+s caps. The trail was a mess and I was soaked. When I finished up the 4 mile section I got into some dry clothes before heading back out. The next 6 miles were hell. I couldn't get out of my own head. The RD said we could drop after our third loop and call it a day with 50k. My legs felt awful and after a lot of waking that is what I did. My third loop was 2:10, about 25 minutes slower that my previous two but it felt like ages.

    Looking back now I hate myself for quitting. This feeling sucks and I never want to feel it again. Like I said above, not sure if I'm cut out for the 100. My training was good and this killed my confidence.

    Not sure what to do from here. Questions for all you vets out there. What do you do about your legs just feeling dead tired and tense?  I'm not sure if it was mental, training, hydration, or nutrition. Is 120ish calories an hour enough?

    Thanks for reading. I'm hoping my venting will take the sting away. I'll try to reevaluate.


    Occasional Runner

      My buddy with the beard is Leon Lutz. He's a damn tough runner and it took him over 11 hours to finish the 50 miler. 69 runner's started the 50 miler and 20 finished it. So don't beat yourself up too much. Conditions were brutal. Shit happens.

       

      Double check your math on the Perpetuem. If you had 4 scoops by the 3rd lap, that's well shy of 120 calories per hour. Are you counting the calories in the Heed too? It's not a great plan to mix the 2 products. It shouldn't bother you, but there's no need for it. Heed has electrolytes but shouldn't be considered an electrolyte replacement drink. You may have expected too much from the Heed and ran low on electrolytes. Either way, it sounds like your issue is probably your fueling strategy.

      9/13- Mid Mountain Marathon

      9/26- Bear 100

      10/18- White Rim Trail FKT

      11/1- Javelina Jundred

      12/6- Cajun Coyote 100

      AT-runner


        Take the day for what it was, a long training run for your 100.  With no taper and no rest, you were likely still feeling the effects of your past 3 weeks.  The long run the week after a 26-31 mile run always feel "tired" for me (and it's usually a drop back week to 16-18 miles).  Then the week after I feel refreshed.  You'll do fine when you are well rested for your goal race.

         

        What is your normal calorie intake per hour on your training runs?  Did you take in any other calories (solid food) at the AS's?

          thanks for the report. I think it's healthy to be able to discuss less than desired results, as well as successes.

          I tend to agree with lace about it sounding like a fueling issue. From my limited real life experience + all the research I've done, 120 calories per hour only works if you weigh under 120 lbs.

          I aim for around 250-300 calories per hour, as I don't weigh 120 lbs.

           

          Also, I'd say if you made it 50K on 1.5 inches of ice, you're definitely cut out for ultra-running. No sane person would subject themselves to torture like that  Wink

          FTYC


          Faster Than Your Couch!

            Great race despite your concerns and doubts. Ice is just bad and takes a lot of strength and mental power out of you.

             

            You have learned at least 2 things: 1) Taper and rest up well before your goal race. and 2) Re-evaluate your fuel strategy.

             

            I think you might have underestimated your calorie needs considering the ice, cold temperatures, rain, and length of the race. I'm under 120 lbs, but with 120 cal/hour, I can just squeeze by in ideal conditions. Nothing like what you've encountered.

             

            I use both Heed and Perpetuem at the same time, but I mix the Perpetuem into a fairly thick liquid (2-4 scoops for a 10-oz. bottle) and use it like a gel. And at some point, there comes a phase where I just can't stand the Perpetuem any more, and just rely on Heed, until I get hungry again.

             

            And, there are a few more things that I can identify which might have contributed to your strain: Slight hypothermia, the "drag" of the wet clothes (they weigh a few pounds), and, like you say, the accumulated fatigue from your training. Perhaps you also went out a bit too fast?

             

            I have had such bad runs in training, and I have probably learned more from those than from runs that went all well.

            I would see the race as a great training run at race effort, something like a B2B long run, ideal training scenario for your 100-miler. Now at least, you know what perhaps to expect in the second half of your goal race, and I'd call this a ton of golden experience!

            Run for fun.

              Thanks for all the replies and support. After getting another nights sleep I feel better about the whole experience. I'm still mad that I gave up and called it a day at 50k but I will take away a lot from the race. At least now I can recognize when things get gloom and work to get myself out of it.

               

              -start practicing my fueling during my long runs. I've been doing them without food to try and train my body to do more with less but that just seems foolish.

               

              -get some of those spikes for next winter. I was unprepared in that sense.

               

              Thanks again everyone. Here's to a good week of running.


              Le professeur de trail

                I concur with everyone else albeit their experience in refueling and longer races is better than mine.  It looks like a combination of three things: the refueling, the ice and your schedule of long runs the last few weekends.  I don't know what your normal pace/speed is but going out at a 1:45 and 1:44 for 10 miles seems a bit fast for just a training run but again maybe that is not fast for you.

                I am curious about your fueling statement - you said " I've been doing them without food to try and train my body to do more with less but that just seems foolish."  I have been doing the same thing.  I can do 3-4 hours (in the winter) with nothing - no water, no food.  After 4 hours I feel it but I wonder that I am not doing myself any good if I am preparing for races of 6+ hours.

                 

                You learn from all exeperiences so take from this all you can.

                 

                By the way, what 100 are you doing in April?

                  I concur with everyone else albeit their experience in refueling and longer races is better than mine.  It looks like a combination of three things: the refueling, the ice and your schedule of long runs the last few weekends.  I don't know what your normal pace/speed is but going out at a 1:45 and 1:44 for 10 miles seems a bit fast for just a training run but again maybe that is not fast for you.

                  I am curious about your fueling statement - you said " I've been doing them without food to try and train my body to do more with less but that just seems foolish."  I have been doing the same thing.  I can do 3-4 hours (in the winter) with nothing - no water, no food.  After 4 hours I feel it but I wonder that I am not doing myself any good if I am preparing for races of 6+ hours.

                   

                  You learn from all exeperiences so take from this all you can.

                   

                  By the way, what 100 are you doing in April?

                   

                  Yeah I've been going about 4 hours with just water. Probably a bad idea, I could be getting stronger long runs in while eating. in April I'm doing the C & O Canal 100.


                  Le professeur de trail

                     

                    Yeah I've been going about 4 hours with just water. Probably a bad idea, I could be getting stronger long runs in while eating. in April I'm doing the C & O Canal 100.

                     

                    This has been something I have been thinking about recently.  I am going to post a question on it over in the ultra forum and see what the response is.

                     

                    Good luck at the C & O.  I guess you don't mind 100 miles of flat.  I've thought about the 100k or 100 miler up in the Wellsboro PA area (Pine Creek Challenge) - beautiful area but I am not sure how my mind would respond to that much flat.


                    Occasional Runner

                      I routinely do my long runs with little or no fuel. But I also know what fuel works and how to properly use it. I would suggest getting that figured out and THEN you can condition your body to efficiently make use of your fat stores for the long runs by reducing your intake while training. Not recommended for high intensity workouts though. Limit it to the LSD.

                       

                      My 26 mile training run on saturday didn't require any calories but I used Hammer Endurolyte Fizz in my hydration pack and went through about 30 ounces of fluid.

                      9/13- Mid Mountain Marathon

                      9/26- Bear 100

                      10/18- White Rim Trail FKT

                      11/1- Javelina Jundred

                      12/6- Cajun Coyote 100

                      FTYC


                      Faster Than Your Couch!

                        Thanks for all the replies and support. After getting another nights sleep I feel better about the whole experience. I'm still mad that I gave up and called it a day at 50k but I will take away a lot from the race. At least now I can recognize when things get gloom and work to get myself out of it.

                         

                        -start practicing my fueling during my long runs. I've been doing them without food to try and train my body to do more with less but that just seems foolish.

                         

                        -get some of those spikes for next winter. I was unprepared in that sense.

                         

                        Thanks again everyone. Here's to a good week of running.

                         

                        Don't beat yourself up over not going over the whole 50M distance. It was supposed to be a training run, so no sense in trying to stick it out and risk injury. Knowing when to quit for what purpose is a very good thing. In your 100-miler, you'll be much more motivated and perked up, and I am sure you won't quit then unless you can't go any further by any means any more.

                        Run for fun.

                        FTYC


                        Faster Than Your Couch!

                           

                          Yeah I've been going about 4 hours with just water. Probably a bad idea, I could be getting stronger long runs in while eating. in April I'm doing the C & O Canal 100.

                           

                          Also wishing you good luck on the C&O Canal 100. Where does it start/end?

                          I have run a lot on the towpath, and I find the surface and flatness the biggest challenges. Be sure to use well-cushioned shoes, and be prepared for long, monotoneous (read: flat, never twisting) stretches.

                           

                          As for fuel strategy testing: You may fast for something like 6 hrs before you start out on your run, then re-fuel after an hour or two, to find out what works best for you. This way, you get some bonking, plus the benefits of fueling during a run.

                          Running over long distances on empty is possible at a lower effort, but I am not sure it does you much good if done too often (the body uses some muscle tissue for fuel then, an that might affect heart health, in my opinion).

                          Run for fun.


                          Irish Luck

                            I'm sorry that you did not finish as planned, but this is a great teaching/learning moment.  Hell, the conditions alone would have me anxious with warnings about hypothermia and icy falls.

                             

                            -get some of those spikes for next winter. I was unprepared in that sense.

                             

                             

                            I have a less expensive way to get traction.  Get familiar with your power drill and sheet metal screws.  Put those bad boys in the outer edge of your trail shoes.  Run in snow, on wet logs, or in ice.  Haven't failed me yet.  I have another runner friend who did the same 50 K and put 15-20 screws in each shoe. 

                            BT survivor since 2003. Trail runner since 2009.

                            I think brain surgery stimulated my running nerve and made me into a trail runner. I'm grateful for both.