Barefoot Runners

1

My first barefoot run (Read 360 times)

    Granted, it was on a treadmill - living in MA doesnt really promote running barefoot in January. But anyway, I have been lurking here a bit and read through some articles on other sites and have decided to give it a try. So I went down in my basement the other night and decided to put in just one mile barefoot on the treadmill. I didnt take it too fast, setting the treadmill about 1mph slower than my normal easy pace, since I didnt really know what to expect. What I did expect was to feel my heel pounding against the treadmill with each step and to be hurting by the time I was done. Luckily that didnt happen. I didnt feel like I modified my stride (at least not much), though I did find myself thinking about it more than I normally would on a run. It felt pretty good, though my feet did ache a bit the next day - mostly the muscles that seemed to be on the top of my foot. All in all I was happy with the experience, but I must say my bigger fear will be when I head outside later in the spring because I just think it's going to kill when I hit a rock or twig or something. On a funnier side note, my wife came downstairs halfway through this mile because she knew I was running and was sure that I would want to eat a Starburst in the middle of my run. Confused But hey, it was cherry flavored so I ate it. Big grin
    Ed4


    Barefoot and happy

      One mile is pretty impressive for the first try. Keep it up, I do think it will help when you finally venture outside in the spring.
      Curious about running barefoot? Visit the new barefoot running group.
        I've had two tries at this so far, both on the treadmill. The first one went fine, only half a mile. My feet felt like they were getting warm at the end, but no soreness. The second time I tried 3/4 mile, and my feet definitely felt hot. I now think they weren't actually hot but almost forming blisters. I wore socks when I ran on the treadmill. Would I be better off without the socks, in terms of friction and blisters?
          I do remember feeling my feet getting hot with some steps, but I think that was just from the belt itself because I actually foudn that if my stride stepped to the right or left a little the belt felt colder there.


          Queen of 3rd Place

            I think the heat is from the belt, when I run outside on the sidewalk it feels nice and cool (I'm in central Cal so it's been in the 40s - 50s here when I run). Which makes me think: come summer and 90s-100s what do people do? That pavement can get hot. Go for the FFs? Arla

            Ex runner

              I think the heat is from the belt, when I run outside on the sidewalk it feels nice and cool (I'm in central Cal so it's been in the 40s - 50s here when I run). Which makes me think: come summer and 90s-100s what do people do? That pavement can get hot. Go for the FFs? Arla
              I ran BF a little last summer here in north Fla. on pavement. A few times it was pretty warm, but not hot at all. I realized that if the pavement was ever too hot to run on, I wouldn't be running anyway due to it being way too hot to run at that time of day. If you run outside in the 90's or more, then yeah the pavement might get to you (you don't run when it's that hot do you???). Then FFs should help. For temps past the 70's I'm on the treadmill! Bill

              I can do 440 in 220      Half Fanatic #846      90% of running is half mental     I ran half of my last race on my left foot!

               

                I've had two tries at this so far, both on the treadmill. The first one went fine, only half a mile. My feet felt like they were getting warm at the end, but no soreness. The second time I tried 3/4 mile, and my feet definitely felt hot. I now think they weren't actually hot but almost forming blisters. I wore socks when I ran on the treadmill. Would I be better off without the socks, in terms of friction and blisters?
                Based on my experience, on a treadmill, barefeet is better than socks.
                  Which makes me think: come summer and 90s-100s what do people do? That pavement can get hot. Go for the FFs? Arla
                  I highly recommend the FFs for asphalt in the summer. Last summer I did one BF run on a rail trail during lunch. The path (asphalt) was extremely hot. I could only run on it for a short time then have to run in the grass and weeds on the side. It was not a very comfortable run.
                  Rudolf


                    in tne summer, early morning is teh answer. during the hot day with burning sun, the concrete on the side of the house, which is in shade is quite cool, so I do BF skipping drills there - jogging nearly on the spot


                    Queen of 3rd Place

                      Often family &etc. have me running when it's in the high 90s here. You get used to it. Maybe the feet will, too. Jeff how were the feet muscles the next day? Arla

                      Ex runner

                        Often family &etc. have me running when it's in the high 90s here. You get used to it. Maybe the feet will, too. Jeff how were the feet muscles the next day? Arla
                        They were a bit achey - mostly the tops and some muscles that I didnt really know were there. I am guessing they are the stabilizing muscles that my feet dont use because of what the shoes do.


                        Queen of 3rd Place

                          So just normal soreness, eh...sounds good. And yeah the twigs and rocks and such are interesting - I've been wimping out and keeping my eyes peeled for clean sections of pavement. Smooth concrete sidewalks feel nice! Oh - and be prepared for some looks. Cool Arla

                          Ex runner

                          Ed4


                          Barefoot and happy

                            I ran barefoot all last summer and never really hit the limit of the pavement being too hot. I'm much more limited by cold than hot.
                            Curious about running barefoot? Visit the new barefoot running group.