Half Marathon Trainers

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yesterday's lesson: eat before you run (Read 264 times)

    Every once in a while you re-learn one of those obvious lessons that you shouldn't really have to experience to know what's best. Yesterday I headed out on a long run (11 miles) and felt some hunger twinges right from the start. I figured I'd only be running for 90 and some change minutes, so I could just tough it out. To make this interesting, I'm visiting my in-laws in the Endless Mtns of PA (near Scranton). Mile 3 was all climbing, then back down the other side for mile 4 and soon I turned around after 5 miles. I was starting to have a hard time at this point, then I hit the uphill I had just come down. It was horrible and I hardly made it up. Down the other side was easy, but after that I hit lots of rollers that I hadn't remembered. I had totally bonked at this point and had a hard time making myself move forward. I finally made it back to the entrance to my in-laws subdivision, which just so happens to be on the top of a small mtn (the road gains about 400 vertical ft in less than a mile). I made it halfway up before giving in and walking. Getting back to the house meant ice-cream to get my blood sugar up, which was good. Anyway, an "easy" long run turned out to be not quite so easy and my left hamstring is pretty sore today. So, as a reminder of the obvious, don't start a long run when you're hungry. It totally takes the fun out of a workout. Tongue


    Needs more cowbell!

      Yup, I always eat something before running. I know there are people that don't have to, but I have a weird metabolism and find that I am usually STARVING by the time I reach home, anyhow. I think I'd get pretty ill if I were hungry to begin with. k

      I shoot pretty things! ~

      '14 Goals:

      • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

      • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

        I usually have a gel before my run. I also have a gel every 4-5 miles afterwards. Definetly makes for a better run if your body is fueled!

        Your toughness is made up of equal parts persistence and experience. You don't so much outrun your opponents as outlast and outsmart them, and the toughest opponent of all is the one inside your head." - Joe Henderson

          Ouch! That's a rough lesson to learn. I found out the hard way that if I'm going more than 8 miles, I need to eat something before I go out.