Ultra Runners

Ice Age 50M (Read 1627 times)

jjameson


    The trail between the nordic trail and horseriders is pretty hilly.  From horseriders to Emma Carlin the trail has less steep hills -- much more runneable.

     

     

    DoppleBock


      It was dark, but when I ran on Wednesday, I remember 3 maybe 4 good hills - But a lot of running on the bottom of the hill or the ridge line.  Where Glacial they never have you run the ridge line - Just up and down.

       

      I ran 100% of the hills back in the dark - But on the way out in the light I walked 4 of them.

       

      I think I am going to start with camelback and a handheld - I will carry 4 packs of Endurox + start with one - This gives me 5 shots of endurox.  I can carry 12 gels in my shorts.  2 gels per hour + 1 endurox per hour @ 500 calories per hour.  I will have a drop bag on the 2nd out and back to Emma Carlin with more endurox and more gels - I would prefer to figure out not to use any drop bags (But will still have them for emergency things. 

       

       

      The trail between the nordic trail and horseriders is pretty hilly.  From horseriders to Emma Carlin the trail has less steep hills -- much more runneable.

      http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

      2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

       

        Thanks for the advice.  So I am now for sure planning on running with my hydration pack.  I recently bought a new one that has enough room easily for 10+ gels and a couple of power bars, plus my shorts can hold 3.  When the temp is in the mid 50's I go through 1.5 liters of water in about 3 1/2 hours, so I'll need to bring a drop bag with extra water.  Right now, the two drop bag plan sounds about right, extra solid food (logan bread), s-caps, gel, water, socks/shoes, and glide in each.  Be prepared is a good motto.

         

        Great advise on handling the trails.  I really don't think there is any other way you can handle it except run by feel unless you are very familiar with the trail and have a particular pacing strategy for each leg based on the terrain.  For me part of this is about enjoying the scenery which I've never really focused on much in a marathon.  I figure I will enjoy the scenery of the first 35 or so miles before I get to enjoy the pain ;-)  At least this is what I keep telling myself so I don't go out too fast.

        DoppleBock


          My 1st IA 50 - I chatted with people

           

          Robert Wehner (Glacial 50M RD) - 1st 9 miles and various other people the next 20ish miles.  I enjoy chatting and running with people as long as they are close to my pace.  Perfect is if I feel like I could pass them, but staying just behind them keeps me from getting caught up the race too soon.  Usually after 30 miles anyone I am passing is well done and I do not want to slow that far down.

           

          Water is available at any aide-station.  I would not pack it in a drop bag.

          http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

          2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

           

          jjameson


            FWIW here is the link for the 19 miles from the training run on saturday.  Start/finish on the nordic loop to Emma Carlin and back.  It is Garmin.

             

            http://connect.garmin.com/activity/83325570

             

             

               Interesting, I expected the elevation gain for your run to be more, not sure if this is just a difference between garmin elevation correction on RA vs Garmin, or if this is really accurate.  Either way, thanks for posting, good stuff!

               

               

              FWIW here is the link for the 19 miles from the training run on saturday.  Start/finish on the nordic loop to Emma Carlin and back.  It is Garmin.

               

              http://connect.garmin.com/activity/83325570

              jjameson


                Yeah, I don't think the elevation is real accurate.  I may be wrong but I believe the Garmin calculates elevation with software that compares your location with known topographical data.  It is an estimate I'm sure.

                 

                 

                  That is typical, I know other software programs do this as well.  The only other method I've heard of is to smooth data points to eliminate large variances.  This is usually less accurate. 

                   

                  Not sure what RA does, but normal GPS accuracy is within 10-25 feet horizontal.  If you are running a ridge line or narrow hill, that can quickly account for the difference in elevation.  Usually it averages out though when using the same software and differences over the same route are less then 5%.  I'm kind of a data junkie and over analyze these things...

                  DoppleBock


                    Last trail run last night - 3:26 on the Northern unit of Kettle Moraine - Ice Age (Greenbush WI).  I should have started on the easier south end then right by Parnell tower - Which is @ 4 miles of really technical stuff.  So the last 40 minutes were with headlamp on the technical stuff.  I did ok:

                    1:43 out

                    1:43 in

                     

                    @ 21 miles Parnell tower to near Mauthe Lake - Turned around a bit early as I was not looking forward to the dark / technical stuff

                    http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                    2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                     

                      I can carry 12 gels in my shorts. 

                       

                      Holy cow.
                      DoppleBock


                        I have 6 pockets Plus a back meshing big pocket

                         

                        2 of the front pockets are smaller and I can go 1 gel - I can actually triple up the 4 other pockets = 14 gels + I can fit 3 baggies of endurox in the big back pocket - Downside is having to tie the shorts really tight as they want to fall down with all the weight.

                         

                        I also carry a little pouch that I can put 3 baggies of endurox + a baggie of s-caps

                         

                        I am counting on 14 gels + 7 servings of Endurox (Starting with one in the bottle) to being enough for 50 miles - 3500 calories in 8 hours.

                        http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                        2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                         

                        HoosierDaddy


                          I have 6 pockets Plus a back meshing big pocket

                           

                          2 of the front pockets are smaller and I can go 1 gel - I can actually triple up the 4 other pockets = 14 gels + I can fit 3 baggies of endurox in the big back pocket - Downside is having to tie the shorts really tight as they want to fall down with all the weight.

                           

                          I also carry a little pouch that I can put 3 baggies of endurox + a baggie of s-caps

                           

                          I am counting on 14 gels + 7 servings of Endurox (Starting with one in the bottle) to being enough for 50 miles - 3500 calories in 8 hours.

                           

                          Curious - you mix endurox in the handheld with water from your camelbak?  you earlier said "shots" of endurox.  Always like hearing how people get calories and wasn't sure what you meant.

                           

                          I usually just mix HEED in camelbak and eat gels.

                            I'm really curious also.  Why do you guys even need a camelback?  Except for an early one that is 5 miles it looks like 4 miles is about the longest distance between aid stations and most are 2-3 miles away.  I'm thinking just one handheld would be fine.

                              I'm no ultra racing veteran, but my strategy is mainly based on a couple of factors:

                              1) I've ran a few runs 30+ miles (longest was 34) this year and wearing a camelback/carrying all the gel/food necessary for the run has worked well so far.

                              2) My plan (injury permitting) is to run as much of the race as possible and don't want to have to stop and refill a water bottle several times.

                              3) I've never used a handheld, for runs over 10 miles a camelback is fine for me...

                               

                              I'm really curious also.  Why do you guys even need a camelback?  Except for an early one that is 5 miles it looks like 4 miles is about the longest distance between aid stations and most are 2-3 miles away.  I'm thinking just one handheld would be fine.

                                 Here is motivation to stay  in front of DB! 

                                Downside is having to tie the shorts really tight as they want to fall down with all the weight.