Ultra Runners

12

nutrition at aid stations (Read 76 times)


HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

    We put on our first local ultra yesterday.

     

    Temperatures just above freezing, and rain mixing with snow.

     

    What we observed is not what we expected -- but is probably what  a lot of you would guess.

     

    All the soups were extremely popular, as was the cocoa and the tea. Essentially, anything hot was very desirable.

     

    Candy and cookies were much less popular.

     

    I can't tell about the potatoes, because we didn't keep track -- we started with LOTS AND LOTS, and ended up with lots, and I can't tell how much got eaten.

     

    (I am used to candy and cookies being far more popular; but I am also unfamiliar with winter ultras.)

    It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

      That's very good to know.

       

      I received an assignment to man an aid station early on in a race, and I'm trying to decide what things we should bring.

       

      How long was the race?


      HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

        50K, but it was three loops, and was advertised offering 1 or 2 or 3, and so some people didn't plan to do all three loops. In the end, only about 25% of the people attempted and completed all three loops. No drop outs partway around, but we did send two finishers to an ambulance for hypothermia check.

        It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.


        HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

          Someone brought a big canopy, and hung plastic covering from the sides as a windscreen, and ran some propane heaters, and those were fantastic - just getting into the tent with the wind blocks was pretty great - for volunteers and finished runners.

          It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

            It's not surprising that what people prefer depends on the weather. It also depends on the distance.

             

            I'll admit to being surprised that a 3-loop 50k had many people going for the hot stuff to drink. Although, as you indicated, since many weren't planning on doing the whole thing, they may not have been rushing.

             

            Hot fluids being popular is what we typically get on a summer 100 miler - typically 40s or cooler at night. IIRC, they usually had hot soup (2 kinds), canned potatoes (salt to your liking), and probably salty snacks like potato chips, pretzels, etc. 50 milers were on their own for the first 38 miles (water from streams). But there was some individually wrapped stuff (e.g. energy bars, but not clif bars) at 12 and 4 mi from the finish. Most people seemed to prefer their own stuff.

             

            In a winter ultra around here, people are more like to go for burgers - at least anything over 50k. Wink  Some of the winter ultras around here have check points at "wilderness lodges" so they may be able to order a regular meal (race doesn't provide anything different). We do have one 50k / 100mi (yesterday and today), one 200mi / 100k, and one 350mi/1000mi (starting next weekend, extending up to 30 days). The route for the 100miler changed this year and may be mostly tent camps 2 tent camps and a few cabins/lodges, but not sure. Most checkpoints in the past are accessible only by plane or snowmachine or human- and dog-powered locomotion.

            "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog

              It may also depend on how used to the cold people are.  Temps just above freezing this time of year would call for a breakout of popsicles and ice cream around here.

              TripleBock


                In the 50k I did a few weeks ago, because of trail conditions and weather, many of us were just going for completion, only a few people were going for competition.  Temps were 8-14F (WI) and it was a trail race with slicker conditions with 4-5 inches of fresh snow over snow/ice base.

                 

                I did go for a little more real food - PB&J and Turkey sandwhich.  But I did not go for hot food until post race.  Typically I do not eat anything from aide stations, except gels and h20.

                I am fuller bodied than Dopplebock


                Muddling through

                  This may be an oddity, but in my 12-hour at Jackpot on Saturday I seemed to do best sticking with snacks on the sweet side like cinnamon rolls and pumpkin pie with water, Coke, or ginger ale to drink. My hands were getting a little puffy and stiff feeling so I avoided salty snacks. Not sure if that was the right decision, but it seemed to work.

                  2014 Goals: Run first trail ultra, first 100K, and see what I can do in a 24-Hour race

                  TripleBock


                    I do not get puffy hands as much from salt as I do from walking a lot.  When I walk a lot my hands are at my side and they seem to swell.

                     

                    This may be an oddity, but in my 12-hour at Jackpot on Saturday I seemed to do best sticking with snacks on the sweet side like cinnamon rolls and pumpkin pie with water, Coke, or ginger ale to drink. My hands were getting a little puffy and stiff feeling so I avoided salty snacks. Not sure if that was the right decision, but it seemed to work.

                    I am fuller bodied than Dopplebock


                    Muddling through

                      I do not get puffy hands as much from salt as I do from walking a lot.  When I walk a lot my hands are at my side and they seem to swell.

                       

                       

                      This was after only one lap of 2.381 miles when I was still mostly running. It definitely puzzled me, but I figured it was best to go with the advice of more experienced runners. I don't know if humidity or relative humidity would affect it, but NV is much drier that what I'm used to in PA.

                      2014 Goals: Run first trail ultra, first 100K, and see what I can do in a 24-Hour race

                      TripleBock


                        Weird - Only 1 lap into the race, I am not sure anything from the race was causing the puffy hands.

                         

                        The worst I have had them was when I paced a friend at Superior 100 - It took 24.5 hours to go 62 miles ... so basically 24.5 miles of hiking.   I could not even bend my fingers.

                         

                         

                        This was after only one lap of 2.381 miles when I was still mostly running. It definitely puzzled me, but I figured it was best to go with the advice of more experienced runners. I don't know if humidity or relative humidity would affect it, but NV is much drier that what I'm used to in PA.

                        I am fuller bodied than Dopplebock

                        TripleBock


                          BTW - Do you know the winning men's and women's 24 hour distances at Jackpot?

                          I am fuller bodied than Dopplebock


                          Muddling through

                            BTW - Do you know the winning men's and women's 24 hour distances at Jackpot?

                            I don't have anything for the 24-hour. The winning time in the 100M was around 15:30-15:40. Results aren't posted yet as far as I know, but they should be up soon on ultrasignup. They hadn't finished measuring the final partial lap when I headed back to my hotel to crash.

                            2014 Goals: Run first trail ultra, first 100K, and see what I can do in a 24-Hour race


                            Best Present Ever

                              It may also depend on how used to the cold people are.  Temps just above freezing this time of year would call for a breakout of popsicles and ice cream around here.

                               

                              Except for the rain mixed with snow part.  Wet weather just above freezing is approximately 1000 times colder than  temps in the single digits.

                              TripleBock


                                Most people have lots of the right clothes for cold, but it is harder to have the right clothes for 33-35F and rain.  But if you have the right clothes it does not matter.

                                 

                                 

                                Except for the rain mixed with snow part.  Wet weather just above freezing is approximately 1000 times colder than  temps in the single digits.

                                I am fuller bodied than Dopplebock

                                12