Ultra Runners

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Garmin and longer races (Read 120 times)

Ojo


    Sorry if this is a repeat question but I tried searching and did not find the answer.  How do you keep track of your miles/time on really long races?  My Garmin dies around 8 hours and my even older one dies after about 2.5.  How do you keep track of 12 - 14 hours?  I just know that if I am alone I might want some way of knowing how I am doing.  Do you just let it go and depend on the aid station locations?  I really don't want to purchase a new garmin -- is there a cheaper solution?

     

    Thanks in advance.

    Sara

    MM #2929


    Refurbished Hip

      In my longer races, I have worn a Garmin on one wrist and a standard stop watch on the other.  I start both at the same time.  When the Garmin goes (my old 205 typically lasts a little longer than 12 hours), I ditch it and just rely on the the stop watch.

       

      You can also rig up something like this:

       

      http://www.runtrails.net/garmin305.html

      jamezilla


      Follower of Forrest

        Not from experience, but I think I would do a cheepo watch like Mandy said, but don't turn on the Garmin until you are 6ish hours from the finish.  Start it at a known time/mileage.  Then you have it when you really want/need it.

        6/21 - Manitou's Revenge 54mi

         

        A man may never run the same trail twice for it is not the same trail and he is not the same man


         


        Bacon Party!

          If I really wanna know, I'll use two Garmins, swapping out at some drop bag.

          (Mostly, I just do it because I think it's neat to have my course maps when I'm done.)

           

          But, usually I don't really wanna know that badly. And, between inaccuracy of trail race mileage and inaccuracy of my Garmins, the margin for error is so high ... well, it's not worth the mental aggravation for me.

           

          More and more, I'm running with just a running watch. (In fact, I recently bought a new one with more lap capacity for timed ultras.)

           

          I still make "pace bands" for most races - A, B, C goals and cut-off (which might be B or C goal!).

          I either tape them to my water bottle or loop them around the strap on my pack - laminated with clear packing tape.

          If I'm feeling frisky, I'll mix in the course elevation profile or do it as a separate band.

          Liz

          pace sera, sera


          Uh oh... now what?

            On the ultralist... there have been several references to using battery packs and USB stuff to extend the life.  Folks talk about the equipment being small enough to take on the run.

             

            Sorry this isn't more helpful.  I don't use a GPS, but some of the workarounds were interesting--probably any sort of question about it to the 'list will get refs to the old threads.


            On On

              I still make "pace bands" for most races - A, B, C goals and cut-off (which might be B or C goal!).

              I either tape them to my water bottle or loop them around the strap on my pack - laminated with clear packing tape.

              If I'm feeling frisky, I'll mix in the course elevation profile or do it as a separate band.

               

              I have done this and the just rely on other people telling me what time it is.  I can usually catch someone at an aid station with a watch.  I put race time and actual time (expected) on my pace sheet so no matter which the aid station person yelled at me I could tell if I was on track or not.  Personally I didn't want to be a slave to an exact pace for the entire race (which I would have felt if wearing and able to know my constant pace) but liked knowing if I was ahead, close, or behind pace at each aid station.  I was able to run more by feel and had a great experience.

               

              I have thought of capturing the entire route too.  If I were going to do that I might put the gps in my back pack or somewhere I couldn't see it.  That way it is still gathering the information for me to analyze later but I don't have to concern myself with it during the race.


              Imminent Catastrophe

                I used a backup battery charger with my Garmin 310. Basically after about 12 hours I plugged it into the charger and put it in my pack. It continued to record data (although the display says Charging and the buttons are locked out). After about 30 minutes I put it back on my wrist and it was back up to 100%. It even tracked while it was in my pack and after almost 27 hours it was still going strong.

                 

                 

                Made for a great picture too.

                "Able to function despite imminent catastrophe"

                 "To obtain the air that angels breathe you must come to Tahoe"--Mark Twain

                "The most common question from potential entrants is 'I do not know if I can do this' to which I usually answer, 'that's the whole point'.--Paul Charteris, Tarawera Ultramarathon RD.

                 

                √ Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 20/21 July 2013

                Boston Marathon 21 April 2014

                Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 19/20 July 2014

                  I stick a handheld (GPSmap 60csx or 62sc) with lithium batteries (longer lived and works better in cold than alkaline or rechargeable) in my pack. I like to make maps. Easy to change AA if in really long races. That gets better data than the wrist-mounted ones anyway. The newer wrist-mounted ones (910xt) are supposed to have longer battery lives - about 20 hrs advertised - and they're probably close to that. I've had my 910xt out to about 8 hrs.

                   

                  I usually have my progress estimated by landmarks, if they're obvious. Some hybrid races with lots of road intersections are confusing to know exactly where.

                  "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
                  Ojo


                    Thank you all for your responses!  This information will also come in handy for this summer when we headed out west for 2 1/2 weeks of camping -- charging the garmin this way will be one less item to somehow plug into the car!  Big grin

                    Sara

                    MM #2929


                    Occasional Runner

                      I wear a cheap watch and I know the distances for the aid stations. I just do the math in my head. I find a Garmin to be a major distraction (in a bad way) when I run 100 milers.

                      9/13- Mid Mountain Marathon

                      9/26- Bear 100

                      10/18- White Rim Trail FKT

                      11/1- Javelina Jundred

                      12/6- Cajun Coyote 100

                      Ojo


                        I used a backup battery charger with my Garmin 310. Basically after about 12 hours I plugged it into the charger and put it in my pack. It continued to record data (although the display says Charging and the buttons are locked out). After about 30 minutes I put it back on my wrist and it was back up to 100%. It even tracked while it was in my pack and after almost 27 hours it was still going strong.

                         

                        I ordered one but I seem to be having an issue that I am not sure how to deal with.  When I plug my Garmin in the charger, the screen reads "saving activity" and then goes in to recharge mode.  The timer is stopped and not recording any further information.  I have the Garmin 210, which shouldn't be too different from the 310.  Confused

                         

                        Thanks in advance!

                        Sara

                        MM #2929

                        Ojo


                          I just thought I would update this thread.  I purchased the 910 and was thrilled with the 23 hours that the battery lasted.  I completed my first 100 mile race last weekend and had GPS up until mile 92.  Had I not gotten a nasty blister around mile 82 I probably could have finished before it died.  I am so happy I upgraded . . . and that I finished!  Big grin

                          Sara

                          MM #2929

                            Congrats Ojo! I was there too, sorry we didn't get to meet, though I'm sure we saw each other many, many, many times.

                             

                            MTA: BTW, my lame 210 only lasted about 7 hours. From there I relied on a regular $8 timex. I miss my 305.

                            I changed this, and you noticed. Hurray for us!

                              Congratulations on your first 100! Glad to hear the 910 lasted 23 hours.

                              "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog


                              Muddling through

                                I was surprised, but pleased, that my 205 last the entire 12 hours plus about 15 minutes more at my race.

                                2014 Goals: Run first trail ultra, first 100K, and see what I can do in a 24-Hour race

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