Ultra Runners

12

My pack list for a 100 mile ultra (Read 74 times)

NNutr


    I got tired of losing my list so I posed it on CarolinaNNutrs.com.  Feel free to suggest.  The list is a staring point; items are added or removed depending on weather, race type and terrain.  Also it assumes you have a crew that will move from aid station to aid station.  Feel free to leave comments on the site.

     

    http://www.carolinannutrs.com/pack-list-for-100-mile-ultra/

    jamezilla


    Follower of Forrest

      Are the "wipes" TP?  If not...TP.  I like to have a supply of ziploc bags (just in general for any trail run).  Sunscreen.  Sunglasses.

      6/21 - Manitou's Revenge 54mi

       

      A man may never run the same trail twice for it is not the same trail and he is not the same man


       

      Snizzle


        Crew?  Are they needed?

         

        Made it a link:  http://www.carolinannutrs.com/pack-list-for-100-mile-ultra/


        Uh oh... now what?

          "One of the more common questions from a new runner is what to bring/pack for a hundred mile race."

           

          I'm one of those sourpusses who thinks it is a shame that newcomers immediately

          jump into the 100-mile efforts.  All the lists in the world will not replace a little bit of

          experience.  When things go wrong you don't need a list.  You need to be able to

          define the problem, figure out if it is a problem or an inconvenience, then proceed to

          either fix it or ignore it.

           

          Since you say your list if for 100-mile ultramarathons, what does the "race type" mean?

           

          Have the hundreds progressed (if that is the right word) to where more people run with

          a crew than without?  I noticed at an event that a lot of folks ignored the very well-done

          aid station and used their own bags or crew--have ultramarathoners become that

          specialized in eating and drinking?

          FTYC


          Faster Than Your Couch!

            Rain jacket

            arm warmers, if you have them

            Insect repellant

            Imodium (anti-diarrheal medication)

            umbrella (if heavy rain is expected, to help crew)

            disinfecting wipes

            lip balm

            poison ivy block and/or remover

            anti-itch gel

            neosporin (+pain relief)

            re-hydration powder or solution to manage severe dehydration

            needle (for popping blisters)

            tweezers

            extra-large band-aids

            gauze bandage and pads

            maps of the larger area to make crew access easier

            tarp (if ground is wet)

            for women: elastics or scrunchies, headband, tampons, extra bra

             

            I wouldn't be too specific with the food, as this is highly specific and different for every runner

             

            recovery food, e.g. protein powder/mix

             

            EDIT: personal medications (allergy, asthma, emergency kits for insect stings or asthma,...)

            Run for fun.

              I will be racing my first 100 this fall, solo - no crew/pacers.  Technically, my first "ultra" was a solo traiing run 4 years ago.  Since then, I have ran more solo training runs of 27+ miles than ultra races.  That doesn't mean I know jack about racing 100 miles.  I'll take any help I can get.

               

              Personally, I like the boy scout motto, "be prepared".  While you are probably right on John M., I'm not willing to risk messing up my fueling if I don't have to as it may be the only thing that keeps me together the whole race.  That's my newbie perspective for what it is worth.


              Uh oh... now what?

                ... 

                Personally, I like the boy scout motto, "be prepared".  While you are probably right on John M., I'm not willing to risk messing up my fueling if I don't have to as it may be the only thing that keeps me together the whole race.  That's my newbie perspective for what it is worth.

                Are you saying you don't use aid stations?  You use drop bags (or a vest or backpack...) only?

                I am not advocating either way.  It was just a comment from something I saw and my wife

                brought it up on the way home.  I am very fortunate in having a "cast iron" stomach.  I have

                done a few runs with a wide variety of food just to check on how it would affect me.  I think

                this is mostly an age thing... we have carried BLTs with us on long runs, used Chicken

                Gumbo soup as an electrolyte replacement enhancer, and there is always the chili dog story...

                silly stuff along the way.

                 

                Use what works for you.  I hope I did not sound evangelistic.

                  Have the hundreds progressed (if that is the right word) to where more people run with

                  a crew than without?  I noticed at an event that a lot of folks ignored the very well-done

                  aid station and used their own bags or crew--have ultramarathoners become that

                  specialized in eating and drinking?

                  Our local 100 (3 hrs away) has no aid stations along the trail part - 38 miles between trailheads - but does have a turnaround aid station with hot soup, salted potatoes, etc. And there's some snacks at the trailheads near start / finish. Most summer trail races (assorted distances) don't have aid stations. So we've just learned to carry our own stuff. Also, for tail of packers, food and fluid may be gone or the entire aid station may be gone by the time we get through. In the few races that do have aid stations, I generally have a greater variety of food than they do. I'll use water in 26.2mi/50k races with aid stations and just tried some orange slices last year. I'm not particularly picky, but I'd rather empty my pack then try something they provide - are gummy bears that different than shot bloks.

                   

                  What I have noticed in the 100 is a migration from solo runners at the turnaround to family-supported at the turn around last year. Part of that is runners marrying other runners. But I've also noticed more people supporting their runners along the gravel road section (12 mi at each end) - usually more of the newer runners, but sometimes experienced ones.

                   

                  Winter ultras usually have more support, but the aid stations / cabins / lodges are further apart (maybe 20 mi apart) so you need to carry stuff, perhaps in a sled. And if there's a blizzard, your time to get to next aid station may be more than anticipated. That said, I don't think I've heard of any winter ultra runner passing up hot food at any of the lodges / cabins - burgers, jumbalaya, and I'm not sure what else. (I haven't done a winter ultra but do watch them and help at finish line.)

                  "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog

                    I use what the aid stations have as much as feasible, but I've found they don't always have what was advertised.  So I pack everything I could need and if I don't need it, no loss.

                     

                    As far as reasons for not eating what-ever I randomly find at aid stations, this is more because I am paranoid about what will happen if my stomach doesn't like what I eat.  Maybe as I get more experienced with 100 milers I'll relax a little about the fueling...

                    Are you saying you don't use aid stations?  You use drop bags (or a vest or backpack...) only?

                     

                    Snizzle


                      I use what the aid stations have as much as feasible, but I've found they don't always have what was advertised.  So I pack everything I could need and if I don't need it, no loss.

                       

                      As far as reasons for not eating what-ever I randomly find at aid stations, this is more because I am paranoid about what will happen if my stomach doesn't like what I eat.  Maybe as I get more experienced with 100 milers I'll relax a little about the fueling...

                      *****sorry, swapped hard drives have messed up a few identity issues beyond my

                      *****usual problems.  Snizzle and John M. are similar things

                       

                      Thank you.  I think my stuff was biased by age.  We did not have the advantage of the

                      Internet and just trained to be able to use whatever was available when we go to the

                      aid stations.  Probably the low point was the stack of one gallon jugs of water that had

                      been heating in the sun for hours.  They were right next to several cases of the greenest

                      bananas we had ever seen.  That was the 49er Double Marathon, 1987--I think.

                       

                      My experience with 100-milers is limited--only a vague memory of brownies and milk

                      somewhere in the dark of the night in the Rockies--and potato soup and cantaloups

                      and watermelons and handfuls of potato chips and an avocado/turkey sandwich and...

                       

                      Best wishes with your hundred--which one?


                      Trail Monster

                        I'm realizing that I am in the minority. I throw on clothes and shoes, put my phone and some fuel in a SPIbelt, carry a handheld (or two), and hope for the best. I've set my best times from 50k to 100k by not having anything to stop for. I walk or run into an aid station, grab a handful of whatever looks good, and run out. Hours can be lost at aid stations if you are constantly stopping to refresh yourself, your supplies, and be babied by your crew. Just my two cents.

                        2013 races:

                        3/17 Shamrock Marathon

                        4/20 North Coast 24 Hour

                        7/27 Burning RIver 100M

                        8/24 Baker 50M

                        10/5 Oil Creek (distance to be determined)

                         

                        My Blog

                         

                        Brands I Heart:

                        FitFluential

                        INKnBURN

                        Altra Zero Drop


                        Imminent Catastrophe

                          Beer, for the shower.

                          "Able to function despite imminent catastrophe"

                           "To obtain the air that angels breathe you must come to Tahoe"--Mark Twain

                          "The most common question from potential entrants is 'I do not know if I can do this' to which I usually answer, 'that's the whole point'.--Paul Charteris, Tarawera Ultramarathon RD.

                           

                          √ Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 20/21 July 2013

                          Boston Marathon 21 April 2014

                          Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 19/20 July 2014

                          NNutr


                            Thanks for all of the replies.

                             

                            Crew:  I don't think they are necessary but are definately nice to have.  I include my wife in all of my planning and she loves the ultra enviroments; from the people to the locations. It's a way to involve your other half your life.  And if she is going to be at the aid stations cheering, I think she would have some extra stuff there.  It's really nice to have some food options when the same old, same old at that aid stations won't make it past the tongue if you know what I mean.

                             

                            There are a lot of race types: Road vs trails.  Mountians vs flat. Forrest vs desert.  You would not take the same things to Badwater as you would take to the Vermont 100.  I dunno maybe you would.  I wouldn't.  Sunscreen for one.  Ice?

                            NNutr


                              OMG.... I can't believe I left that off the list.

                              Beer, for the shower.

                                *****sorry, swapped hard drives have messed up a few identity issues beyond my

                                *****usual problems.  Snizzle and John M. are similar things

                                 

                                Thank you.  I think my stuff was biased by age.  We did not have the advantage of the

                                Internet and just trained to be able to use whatever was available when we go to the

                                aid stations.  Probably the low point was the stack of one gallon jugs of water that had

                                been heating in the sun for hours.  They were right next to several cases of the greenest

                                bananas we had ever seen.  That was the 49er Double Marathon, 1987--I think.

                                 ....

                                I don't think it's a function of the internet or age, but rather a function of availability of volunteers to get supplies to certain places (either road access or backpacking in) and stay there. In bear country, you don't leave food sitting out - well, maybe green bananas Wink. But this is also why our local summer ultra have stream crossings to get water. The ultras near Fairbanks might be more formal, but down here, we're still closer to fatass, but adding things for safety as they're getting newer runners, who may not be as prepared.

                                 

                                I never heard of aid stations until the internet. Then again, I hadn't heard of races for general public or ultras until internet.

                                "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
                                12