Ultra Runners

12

Novice Advice (Read 632 times)

Ojo


    I am running a technical 50k on October 23.  I realize that I am under trained (major surgery July put me out for a few weeks) but I plan on taking my time and enjoying the day.  We did an 8 mile run on the first part of the race today and it was tough -- it is tough to begin with without adding all the damage from Irene.  Since I am mainly a road runner, I tend not to pick my feet up.  So beyond the obvious . . . pick your feet up . . . is there any other basic advice?  I realize this is a loaded question but I am just looking for some strategies to make it to the finish.  Thanks.

     

    And just curious, has anyone ever run Bimbler's Bluff in Guilford, CT?

    Sara

    MM #2929


    Consistently Slow

      Walk aaaaaaaaall the uphills. Eat at all the aid stations. Salt is a good thing. Good luck.

       Appears to be a hard 50K. I survived one with this grade .Good luck.

      ultra runnning:

      23-Oct-2011

      Hide Detail Bimbler's Bluff 50K

      Guilford, CT 50km 4 4 http://mrbimble.com/WordPress/bluff/

      The Bimblers Bluff 50k is an off road foot race through several inter-connected woodland preserves
      in southern Connecticut. Consisting entirely of rolling forest roads or single track that can be
      extremely rocky, the course will provide a true test of the runner’s fitness and mental stamina

      Run until the trail runs out.

      2014***1500 miles 09/28/14

      50miler 13:26:18

      Race Less Train More

       

      Ana Trason  "Living Her Life"

      "The Marble in The Groove"

       

      unsolicited chatter

      http://bkclay.blogspot.com/

      Ojo


        Thanks.  It does have a 10 hour cut off time so I think I can do this. 

         

        Does it help to put vaseline or glide on your feet?  We will go through several small streams.  I usually wear wool blend socks.

        Sara

        MM #2929

          I'll be checking out this thread for sure!  I'm curious about how to make trail running hurt less.  Big grin

          Michelle

          Marathon Maniac # 3228




          Bacon Party!

            I use SportShield on my toes - tend to have issues with underlapping pinky toes.

            But, have not yet had trouble with wet feet (although my feet have spent plenty of time wet).

             

            Take a look at the course. If you think you can gain some advantage by stashing dry socks, then do it. But, if I knew my feet would likely be wet the whole time, I probably wouldn't bother. (Blisters heal quickly.)

             

            You know about walk/run and hills... But, I'd suggest trying to run whenever you think you can (within reason - think efficiency vs. effort) - especially if you think you'll have a lot of blow-down (trees) and other crap to navigate (that will spoil a walk, let alone a run).

             

            Other than that, the old ultra stand-bys...

            - Eat before you're hungry.

            - Drink before you're thirsty. (OK - debatable.)

            - Walk before you have to.

             

            Oh, and lube everything.

            Liz

            pace sera, sera

              Not trying to hijack but this seems like a good place for this - If running a 50 miler with aid stations approximately 4 miles apart on a course with the same loop 4 times, will there be any real advantage to wearing a camelbak?  I did 17 with a friend the other day who had one and I was a little jealous of him being able to sip whenever he wanted.  I do tend to need a lot of fluids and tons of salt so I guess it would be a way to spread all that a lot more evenly.   

               

              At this point I'm a little confused about how I got myself into this to be honest.

               

              DoppleBock


                If this is a trail run - Pack TP

                 

                What is your hydration / electrolyte / nutrition strategy?  If this is a hilly technical 50k - I could be > 6 hours out there. 

                 

                How far between aide stations?  You can not think of time between aide stations like a marathon - 4 miles might = 45 minutes to an hour.

                 

                50k - Think of it as a hiking experience with some jogging between hikes - Walk the uphills - Take it easy on the downhills - You cannot go into the race with the mentality you will cash in on the downhills that you paid for with the uphill work.  Unless you practice all the time with downhill running - fast downhill running will trash your quads and make you race miserable.

                 

                The only time I fall in technical races is when the trail becomes less technical and I stop watching closely - I get lasy and then I am on the ground.

                 

                Technical running - Sometimes it is much easier to step on a rock or root than trying to dance around all of them - I tend to pick a pretty traight line and just go down the hill - I find I get in trouble when I am dancing back and forth trying to avoid stuff and I end up off balance.  Of couse there are some really big rocks to avoid and little ankle rollers to avoid.

                 

                In the race - Give yourself at least 10 feet - 15 is better from the runner in front of you - Its hard to time your steps to avoid stuff if you are on their heals.

                 

                Relax - This is not a road race - Its about enjoying the day and the people around you -

                 

                 

                I am running a technical 50k on October 23.  I realize that I am under trained (major surgery July put me out for a few weeks) but I plan on taking my time and enjoying the day.  We did an 8 mile run on the first part of the race today and it was tough -- it is tough to begin with without adding all the damage from Irene.  Since I am mainly a road runner, I tend not to pick my feet up.  So beyond the obvious . . . pick your feet up . . . is there any other basic advice?  I realize this is a loaded question but I am just looking for some strategies to make it to the finish.  Thanks.

                 

                And just curious, has anyone ever run Bimbler's Bluff in Guilford, CT?

                http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                 

                  Not trying to hijack but this seems like a good place for this - If running a 50 miler with aid stations approximately 4 miles apart on a course with the same loop 4 times, will there be any real advantage to wearing a camelbak?  I did 17 with a friend the other day who had one and I was a little jealous of him being able to sip whenever he wanted.  I do tend to need a lot of fluids and tons of salt so I guess it would be a way to spread all that a lot more evenly.   

                   

                  At this point I'm a little confused about how I got myself into this to be honest.

                   

                  I'm no expert, and I'm a little confused about how I got myself into this too.

                   

                  The other advantage would be not having to refill your water as often, but the trade off is the extra weight. Handheld water bottles have a lot going for them too.

                  When it’s all said and done, will you have said more than you’ve done?

                  DoppleBock


                    Dehydration is a deadly sin of ultra running or at least it will kill your race

                     

                    4 miles on a flat easy trail might be 30 minutes or a technical trail with steeps up and downs - 45 minutes to an hour.

                     

                    Handhelds carry 20 ounces - plenty for some races

                     

                    We have a 50 mile race with a fair amount of hills and technical trail - Aide stations are 7-13.5-20-25(turn around) 30-36.5-43

                     

                    I will wear a camelback - Most other veterans will do a camelback or 2 handhelds - Some newbies to this race try 1 handheld and usually suffer greatly.

                     

                    Ice Age 50 - I ran in 2008 with 1 handheld and did great.  In 2011 I ran with a camelback and did great - I went with a camel back because I like to drink and eat and take salt on the clock and not according to aide stations.  If I am going toeat every 20 minutes and salt every 30 or 45 - Its easier to have h20 at hand at all times.  If I thought I would be competetive for the win - I would likely have went with the 1 handheld again.

                    http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                    2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                     

                      Dehydration is a deadly sin of ultra running or at least it will kill your race

                       

                      4 miles on a flat easy trail might be 30 minutes or a technical trail with steeps up and downs - 45 minutes to an hour.

                       

                      Handhelds carry 20 ounces - plenty for some races

                       

                      We have a 50 mile race with a fair amount of hills and technical trail - Aide stations are 7-13.5-20-25(turn around) 30-36.5-43

                       

                      I will wear a camelback - Most other veterans will do a camelback or 2 handhelds - Some newbies to this race try 1 handheld and usually suffer greatly.

                       

                      Ice Age 50 - I ran in 2008 with 1 handheld and did great.  In 2011 I ran with a camelback and did great - I went with a camel back because I like to drink and eat and take salt on the clock and not according to aide stations.  If I am going toeat every 20 minutes and salt every 30 or 45 - Its easier to have h20 at hand at all times.  If I thought I would be competetive for the win - I would likely have went with the 1 handheld again.

                       

                      Thanks Bonkin and DB.  DB, that's great, I'm a bigger guy too and have consistent salt and hydration issues.  I'll definitely carry water then either hanheld or camelbak.  I'm leaning toward camelbak because I hate carrying stuff. 

                       

                      xor


                        >> Most other veterans will do a camelback or 2 handhelds - Some newbies to this race try 1 handheld and usually suffer greatly.

                         

                        I've been that guy.  And I SEE that guy/gal at almost every ultra with aid stations 7-10 miles apart, especially in summer, because they don't quite get that 7 trail miles are longer than 7 road miles (the joke answer is rooted in a semantic truth: it can take you a whole lot longer).

                         

                        I like handhelds way better than a pack.  And I learned the hard way "when in doubt, take two.  In fact, unless I'm completely sure, take two."

                         

                        Ojo


                          In the race - Give yourself at least 10 feet - 15 is better from the runner in front of you - Its hard to time your steps to avoid stuff if you are on their heals.

                           

                          Funny because both times I tripped were when I was running too close to others and was not on the best part of the trail.

                           

                          I think I have the hydration and electrolytes worked out but need to work on the food.  I normally only carry GU and I have never gone past 5 1/2 hours.  I heard the aid stations have grilled cheese sandwiches and other snacks that you can put in a baggy to carry.  I guess the question is whether I should switch to a pack vs. the belt I normally wear comfortably.

                          Sara

                          MM #2929

                            - I went with a camel back because I like to drink and eat and take salt on the clock and not according to aide stations. 

                             

                            This for me as well. 

                            Also, on really technical trails, I find that I can better balance with my hands free.

                            DoppleBock


                              My 1st 50 miler - I ate 25 gels

                              My last 50 miler - I ate 15 gels and had 7 baggies of endurox I added to my handheld and mixed with h20 = 7x300 = 2100 calories

                               

                              I would not try something new that I have not eaten while running - I have eated bananas, watermelon, doughnuts, PB&J, Ham & Cheese Sandwiches, salted nut bars and soup successfully.  I have struggled with Pizza, M&Ms, Cookies and pretzels.  I have multiple experiences with Pizza and it tastes great, but after about an hour I feel like poop.

                              http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                              2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                               

                              DoppleBock


                                Poeple joke about the handhelds being like airbags when you fall ... Not my experience - In the July 50k that I fractured my radial bone (Inside the elbow joint) it was the arm I had a handheld in.  My mind was not ready for my hand hitting the ground yet as it should have had 3 more inches. 

                                 

                                This for me as well. 

                                Also, on really technical trails, I find that I can better balance with my hands free.

                                http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                                2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                                 

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