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running form or stride? (Read 673 times)

LTD


    I was running my 6.25 mile run last Sunday. That is a long run for me. About 4 miles in my feet, ankles, calfs started to hurt. I changed my stride and it helped. I was running a quicker turnover without picking up my feet too much the first 4 miles......... Then I concentrated on bending my knees more on the stride and lifting my knees a little higher and pulling my legs forward with my thighs. My stride got longer and I covered the same amount of ground with a slower turnover. It also stopped the aching in the lower part of my leg. I tried both strides while running a 5K on the treadmill this morning. The longer stride whith my knees bending more and pulling with my thighs was easier on my legs. And lowered my heart rate just a little while keeping the same speed on the treadmill. Seems like this new stride is better, but I really have to think about it while running, or I go back to old stride. Does this sound right? And what is good form (stride?) Thanks' Terry


    Just Be

      How long have you been running? The type of pain you are experiencing is common and expected in beginner runners. Looking at your log, if you indeed have only been running since December of 2007 then you might be pushing an overuse injury with as much mileage as you're logging. Take a day or two to rest and that should give your muscles/tendons, etc., time to adapt to the higher workload. With regard to stride, just run however is natural to you... meaning, whatever your mind/body tell you is the right form, use that. Finding it is a bit of an artform, but with great focus and time, you'll discover the form that suits you best. Good luck!
        Go back to the old stride. The changes that you describe were causing you to overstride which is just the opposite of what you should be working toward. Overstriding forces your foot plant out in front of your center of gravity which slows your pace and puts a lot more stress on your legs. It probably felt better on your run because you were using muscles that you don't normally use that weren't fatigued. If you want to learn more about what constitutes proper form I would suggest the book Programmed to Run by Thomas Miller. He does a great job of explaining what good form is and offers numerous exercises and drills to help you achieve it. You'll likely find that even your faster rate is still slower than ideal. Tom
          Go back to the old stride. The changes that you describe were causing you to overstride which is just the opposite of what you should be working toward. Overstriding forces your foot plant out in front of your center of gravity which slows your pace and puts a lot more stress on your legs. It probably felt better on your run because you were using muscles that you don't normally use that weren't fatigued. If you want to learn more about what constitutes proper form I would suggest the book Programmed to Run by Thomas Miller. He does a great job of explaining what good form is and offers numerous exercises and drills to help you achieve it. You'll likely find that even your faster rate is still slower than ideal. Tom
          Tom, thanks for mentioning this book. I just ordered it. Only 5 books left in stock on Amazon.com. Teresa
          LTD


            Thanks' I will get the book this weekend. I am sure I am leaving some on the table with poor, or at least not the best form. On another note: I watched the world record 5K run on youtube last night..... WOW 12:39 !!!! Terry