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Tri Bike (Read 3511 times)


Needs more cowbell!

    How YOU doin'?! Evil

    Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

    '14 Goals:

    • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

    • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

      a Q Roo ! Damn it T-Bone, I knew there was something I liked about you.

       

      And to the OP.....well put by T-Bone........Multiple bikes is really the only answer.

       

      And T-Bone. Thanks for not saying "A Tri-Bike saves your legs for the run" I always want to scream when I see someone say that. Nicely put explanation.

       

      www.hplg.net  The Human Powered League - Solo Cup Series - Trail Building

        How YOU doin'?! Evil

         

        Fine, yourself ?

         

        Oh.......sorry, you weren't asking me......LOL

        www.hplg.net  The Human Powered League - Solo Cup Series - Trail Building


        Needs more cowbell!

          Heh. Big grin

          Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

          '14 Goals:

          • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

            You can find a very nice used tri bike for 500 to 750. I bought my wife an 05 Quintana Roo Kilo with a 105/Ultegra mix for 500 about three months ago. They are out there and if you're a northerner, keep your eyes peeled for the people that are ready to upgrade this fall after the tri season is over. She also has a high end road bike to do exactly what T-bone does, ride the road bike on group and fun rides then train, race on the tri bike.

             

            The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

             

            2014 Goals:

             

            Stay healthy

            Enjoy life

             


            HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

              All this aerodynamic position nonsense -- what you really want, to save your legs, is a motor.

              It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.


              Puttin' on the foil

                How YOU doin'?! Evil

                 

                Are you a co-ed, er?

                Don't be obsessed with your desires Danny. The Zen philosopher Basha once wrote, 'A flute with no holes, is not a flute. A donut with no hole, is a Danish.'


                jules2

                  Without the knowing the geometry it looks like a road bike to me, I can't compare the price and I find it odd its named after the Windsor Triathlon as its just a normal sort of event, there are a lot more tough triathlons in the UK.  I've never heard of the brand over here I suppose it must be the Royal connection they hope will sell the bike..

                   

                  I'd prefer to see what I'm buying first.

                   

                  As someone else has touched on cycling / triathlon is very fickle so you could pick up a really good second hand bike that has hardly been used.

                   

                  I wouldn't go for an out and out tri bike unless she is taking it seriously as they can be a bit shall we say twitchy also she might struggle with the high gears if there are hills.

                   

                  Unless you are at a high level the detail on the bike does not really matter, I once had a good result in a MTB race with a cheap Gary Fisher hardtail that was worth less than the forks on most of the bikes I was racing against.

                   

                  Old age is when you move from illegal to prescribed drugs.


                  Boston Strong in 2014!

                    Add me to the ranks of folks who vote for road bike with clip-on tri-bars for racing.  I've done 1 du...had a blast.  Couldn't fit more into this year's schedule due to money and conflicts, but hope to do at least 3 next year.  Were I doing tris or dus at the rate of 6 or more/year + some time trials AND with any potential to actually be truly competive I could maybe justify the expense of such a specialized bike.  I've seen enough people buy TTs and then find that they are really miserable on that geometry.

                     

                    She could look at a road bike with a lightweight, stiff frame and performance geometry and be comfortable for both centuries and races.  After riding that beast of a mtn. bike (I have one like that...2 sizes too big for me and weighs almost 2x as much as my road bike--no wonder I balked at cycling for so long) she will fly on any road frame.

                     

                    I am using a road bike for tris, but considering adding clip-on aerobars. Is this really effective? Do you get your bike refitted for the aero position? I've heard mixed advice as to how much this will improve my time, but at this point, I can't afford a dedicated tri bike.

                    2014 goals

                    2000 miles; 5k < 24:30; HM < 1:56Century Bike Ride

                     

                    Upcoming:

                    NYC Half Marathon 3/16Boston Marathon 4/21


                    Needs more cowbell!

                      I am using a road bike for tris, but considering adding clip-on aerobars. Is this really effective? Do you get your bike refitted for the aero position? I've heard mixed advice as to how much this will improve my time, but at this point, I can't afford a dedicated tri bike.

                       

                      There are a few models of aerobars specifically designed to work with road bike geometry--meaning the rider doesn't need to mess with a different seat post or position on the bike.  I recently picked up a used pair of Profile Design Jammer carbon GTs (for less than a pair of new aluminum ones, which are a good deal heavier).  I haven't used them yet, since they are frowned upon on group rides and I haven't done any solo rides in weeks.  But I plan to use them during a duathlon in less than 5 weeks.  This model was highly recommended to me.  I know a few other people who use the Profile Design Century bar, but it's a 1 piece loop and I wanted 2 bars--that way I'd have more adjustability in width and angle.

                      Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

                      '14 Goals:

                      • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                      • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                        Be careful about second hand bikes - of course you can get some great bargains, but it's important that bikes fit reasonably well. The advantage of buying new is that a shop has lots of models in lots of frame sizes, so you have a decent chance of finding something that feels good to ride.

                          Be careful about second hand bikes - of course you can get some great bargains, but it's important that bikes fit reasonably well. The advantage of buying new is that a shop has lots of models in lots of frame sizes, so you have a decent chance of finding something that feels good to ride.

                          I'm not a bike shop employee or anything, but some other advantages:

                          1. The shop typically (but not always) knows much more about proper fitting for road or tri bikes than the private seller or the private buyer.
                          2. The original purchaser of a brand-name bike usually gets a lifetime frame warranty, but that doesn't carry over to subsequent owners.
                          3. The shop includes the cost of setting the bike up and fitting you into the purchase price.  Buy used and you have to pay for those out of pocket, which in my area would have run another $100-$150.
                          4. A shop will include an initial adjustment and annual check-ups with a new-bike purchase.
                          5. If you don't have all your kit, the shops usually give you at least 10% off anything you buy (with the purchase or, in some cases, for the first year afterward).

                          But you'll get hit with sales tax buying new.

                           

                          I started looking used but couldn't find anything local.  Once I expanded my radius, the cost of gas, tuneup/setup, fitting, and full-price on gear ... buying new was about $100 more.  To get the frame warranty, the adjustments/tuneups and start a relationship with the shop, I thought it was worth the extra cost.  YMMV.

                           

                          I downloaded CraigsPAL, and it was a really useful hunting tool.

                          “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

                            There are a few models of aerobars specifically designed to work with road bike geometry--meaning the rider doesn't need to mess with a different seat post or position on the bike.  I recently picked up a used pair of Profile Design Jammer carbon GTs (for less than a pair of new aluminum ones, which are a good deal heavier).  I haven't used them yet, since they are frowned upon on group rides and I haven't done any solo rides in weeks.  But I plan to use them during a duathlon in less than 5 weeks.  This model was highly recommended to me.  I know a few other people who use the Profile Design Century bar, but it's a 1 piece loop and I wanted 2 bars--that way I'd have more adjustability in width and angle.

                             

                            I was aware that aerobars are frowned upon during group rides for safety reasons, but having a clip-on set mounted on your road bike bars shouldn't bother anyone if you're not riding in them.

                             

                            The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

                             

                            2014 Goals:

                             

                            Stay healthy

                            Enjoy life

                             

                              I think it depends where your brake levers are mounted/accessible.

                              “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman


                              HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                                http://www.bamacyclist.com/articles/bars.htm

                                 

                                He argues that the decreased reaction times, stability, and maneuverability are the most significant reasons that group riders should not be on aerobars.

                                It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

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