1

trail shoe recommendations (Read 989 times)

    I'm repeating an earlier thread, but very little specific information (brands, models, etc.) was given: http://www.runningahead.com/forums/topic/f9a964509bb34f15bbb281aa9732eae0 Let's try again: 1) Do you all have any favorite trail shoes? 2) Is there such a thing as a trail racing flat--traction of a trail shoe, but lightweight like a racer? 3) Are trail shoes worth the money or should I just run the trails in my road trainers?
    Scout7


    CPT Curmudgeon

      I have a pair of Adidas trail shoes that have Gore-Tex. They do a pretty good of keeping the feet dry in the rain and in incidental puddles, but I've been on runs where we cross rivers, and there ain't no way of getting around wet feet when the water is up to the boys, so to speak. I know Teva makes a pretty lightweight trail racer (X-1, http://www.teva.com/ProductDetails.aspx?productID=6745N&model=X-1&mnu=mens) I would say that it depends on the terrain. If you're talking about a trail run that is very technical, then a trail-specific shoe might do you some good. I know I did my first in my trainers, and at the end my feet felt like someone had taken a baseball to the soles. I surmise it was from landing on the edges of rocks and such, so the stiffer sole helps mitigate that to some extent. Right now, I'm looking for something that offers greater ankle support, since in the last one I managed to roll each ankle twice within the first 4 miles, the left one bad enough that I had to take a week from training (after finishing the race, of course).
        I know Teva makes a pretty lightweight trail racer (X-1, http://www.teva.com/ProductDetails.aspx?productID=6745N&model=X-1&mnu=mens)
        That is one ugly shoe.
        Scout7


        CPT Curmudgeon

          The uglier, the better. Running shoes are SUPPOSED to be garish.
            Good thread. Hope to see some more info on this, since I'm 100% clue-free on the topic. (Since I just tossed up that softball, feel free to insert the obvious joke here). I may be in the market soon; hope to hear from some of the ultra runners (where is Lynn, anyway?) How much running on pavement can you do with trail shoes? In other words - can I run the 2 miles to the park in them?
            E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
            -----------------------------


            A Dance with Monkeys

              Has anybody run in running or trail sandals, such as the standard Tevas? I did a bit of hiking this past Summer in the Rockies wearing Teva sandals and tech socks, and they were very lightweight and sturdy.
                Another question is Gortex or mesh? If you are going to end up with wet feet from creek crossings wouldn't it be better to have a mesh top? Mesh would also seem better for sweaty feet. Ewa
                I would rather wear out than rust out. - Helen Klein You create your own universe as you go along. - Winston Churchill
                Scout7


                CPT Curmudgeon

                  Ok couple questions I might be able to answer... You can run on the street with trail shoes. I do it when it's raining. Depending on the shoe, you will notice a difference. My Adidas feel much stiffer on the road, and almost slippery at times. But I've done 6+ miles on roads at a shot in 'em, with no real injuries. As for Gore vs. mesh.....I thought the Gore would be great, and for some races, it is. If the trails are primarily dirt / gravel, and all you really gotta worry about is some puddles and mud, then they work pretty well. If you're talking about real offroad type stuff where you're gonna be doing stream / water crossings, or in mud that goes to the mid-calf (I've done races with both), then the mesh is probably a better choice, more for drainage purposes. This is based solely on my personal experiences, so YMMV. Oh, and Gore-Tex breathes pretty well, so my feet are no more sweaty in those shoes than my regular trainers. Of course, my feet are really sweaty regardless, and I'm using the trail shoes in bad weather or off-road, so chances are, my feet are gonna be pretty wet and nasty despite what I wear.
                    1) Do you all have any favorite trail shoes? 2) Is there such a thing as a trail racing flat--traction of a trail shoe, but lightweight like a racer? 3) Are trail shoes worth the money or should I just run the trails in my road trainers?
                    I just bought a pair of Brooks Cascadia online (http://www.runningwarehouse.com/trailshoesmen.html) - haven't gotten them yet, but anxious to try them out. Puma makes a racing trail shoe called the Trailfox (although the Cascadias are lighter). I decided on trail shoes after wasting my road shoes in the mud and slop of the local parks.
                    The danger of civilization, of course, is that you will piss away your life on nonsense. Jim Harrison
                      I got asics trail attack ll shoes. They feel like normal running shoes on roads to me (about 50% of my runs are on roads). I think they help a lot in the woods. Also they have the tounge sewn in so that little rocks and twigs dont get inside which i like. And their light. http://outside.away.com/outside/gear/gear.tcl?gear=Asics-Gel-Trail-Attack-II&gear_id=581&action=showgear
                      “Intellectual growth should commence at birth and cease only at death”-Pre To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the Gift." Pre I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." Steve Prefontaine It's at the borders of pain and suffering that the men are separated from the boys." - Emil Zatopek
                        Thanks for all the input. Check these out: http://www.sneakerhead.com/18121201.html Pretty sweet.
                          I love Pearl Izumi's shoes, both road and trail. They're seamless in the upper and have great traction in the trail version. A climber friend of mine said they were the best shoes she'd even gone bouldering in.
                          1000 mile club. "Pain is just the weakness leaking out."


                          You'll ruin your knees!

                            I'm repeating an earlier thread, but very little specific information (brands, models, etc.) was given: http://www.runningahead.com/forums/topic/f9a964509bb34f15bbb281aa9732eae0 Let's try again: 1) Do you all have any favorite trail shoes? 2) Is there such a thing as a trail racing flat--traction of a trail shoe, but lightweight like a racer? 3) Are trail shoes worth the money or should I just run the trails in my road trainers?
                            My favorites are built by Montrail, but I have a concern that the recent buyout of Montrail by Columbia may lead to an inferior product. In the Montrail line, I have run in the Hurricane (Gore-Tex), the Hardrock, the Leona Divide, and the Masai. I have logged the most miles in the Hardrock model, and it is my favorite by far. For more tame trails, the Masai (no longer in production, I believe) is great, very light weight but with a decent protection plate for sticky-uppy thingies and a fair toe bumper for trippy thingies. The Hardrock is a tank, providing quite good protection for my feet. I did over 100 miles in a pair of Hardrocks on an asphalt course (UltraCentric 48 hour run) recently with no issues (other than the obvious), so I am fine with them on the road. A note on Gore-Tex - for me, here in North Texas, I find very little reason to wear this fabric. First, I sweat a lot and it all runs right down my legs into my shoes. The gore-tex just collects the sweat and squish, squish...not a good thing. If dealing with water crossings on trails, I prefer a good draining shoe that allows my socks to do their thing - wick moisture away from my skin so I can have a worry-free run (or race). I have had good success with Brooks shoes, although it has been a couple of years since I ran in them. The Trespass line was good for me, I am not sure if they still make them. I agree with the previous poster that the biggest driver of whether you need trail shoes is the terrain. Trail shoes are heavier, stiffer and lower to the ground than road shoes. If the terrain is "technical", meaning lots of rocks, roots, poor footing...then trail shoes are great. If you are running on dirt paths, I would think that your favorite roadie would be sufficient. For me, trail shoes are definitely worth it. New Balance makes a lot of crossover models that I hear my trail buddies brag about. I believe Asics also makes some good crossovers. I don't have any advice about racing flats for trails. Good luck with it! Lynn B

                            ""...the truth that someday, you will go for your last run. But not today—today you got to run." - Matt Crownover (after Western States)

                              Lynn B
                              Well holy iguana poop, Batman. Lynn is still breathing. I was starting to wonder. Where ya been?
                              E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
                              -----------------------------


                              You'll ruin your knees!

                                Well holy iguana poop, Batman. Lynn is still breathing. I was starting to wonder. Where ya been?
                                Hadta ski....did watch part of Batman Begins while out...didn't see any iguana poop, just some husky poop on the Bull o'the Woods trail at 9,200 feet while tryin' to get a couple o'miles in...I seriously think they should put more oxygen in their air there in Taos Ski Valley! Lynn B

                                ""...the truth that someday, you will go for your last run. But not today—today you got to run." - Matt Crownover (after Western States)

                                1