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New to running, couple of questions (Read 319 times)

cm91


    Hi everyone,

    I am new to running, and have been doing the C25K program for a couple of weeks (only finished week 1 because I repeated a bit), and doing some self-paced exercise in between. I'm quite unfit, so this is probably all me getting ahead of myself but I want to make sure it's not indicative of bad habits.

    Sometimes I test myself to see what I'm capable of, and so far it's about 1 kilometre without stopping before I feel ill or faint. I usually do it on the treadmill, where I can stand a bit more - when I do it outside the impact has more of an effect. I struggle to breathe properly by then, but the physical difficulty isn't as bad in my legs (except a niggling knee issue I suspect is related to old shoes) as it is in my upper body. It feels like my arms and chest are struggling through water and my back starts to hurt. Is this just because I'm new, and unfit? Or is it bad breathing or posture? I try to keep my arms and hands quite relaxed and straighten my upper body, but when I'm struggling I do tend to slump. I ran with my boyfriend, who does 5k every session, on the weekend and he said I seemed to be breathing too fast/shallow, but I'm not sure if it's an actual issue or it's just because he's not even slightly out of breath after 1k! Joking

    Also, I do the C25K program every second day but still try to walk and jog a bit on most of the off-days. Is this too much? It's kinda hard to convince myself that resting or just walking on the off-days still leads to progress. I would love to just walk and lazily swim around a pool on those days but so far it's proven difficult to find the time/motivation and money (unemployed full-time university student living off study assistance). Time management has never been a strong point and exams are looming.

    Thanks for any advice, and I'm sorry if I am repeating past questions!

      I think you're just getting ahead of yourself. A whole km is too much for you at this point. The first week of Couch to 5k has you running for 60 seconds and walking for 90 seconds. If you're doing a kilometer without stopping, that's what, probably 7 or 8 minutes of running? You may be thinking "but it's only a kilometer!" but it doesn't matter - too much is too much Smile

       

      In other words: Patience Smile Just keep doing Couch to 5k, it's a really good program, as many here can attest.

       

      Upper body: Do you do any exercises for your upper body and core? That part of you will get more fit as you run more, but you can also supplement with core exercises like lunges, squats, planks (google for details!) - you don't need a gym for these, body weight is fine. I suspect that working on your abs and core would help with your tired upper body issue.

       

      Off days: Walking seems like a good idea for you at this point. Swimming is also great, if you can find a pool and make the time. But walking is good. Really! Follow the training plan!

       

      Good luck!

      meg2the5th


        I am not a "runner" but I did complete the Ease to 5 K program. I am very slow at running, but most of the advice that I have gotten is what Harriet said. If you push too hard, you will get so sick of it and tire out. The breathing takes time, when I first started my breathing felt so shallow, I think the walking/running really helps your lungs and muscles gradually work their way up. Patience is definitely something that has been my friend on this running journey. I like running 3-4 miles  at my easy pace, it is a good thing because I can't do much more than that. I just keep hoping that the speed and endurance will build as time goes on.

         

        Just keep at it. I am a student as well.  Last semester, I thought my stress was going to cause a heart attack. I can tell you that this semester has been much better as far a stress and I think the running has everything to do with it. I make time between studying, class and family somehow and it is so worth it.

          It sounds like when you ran with your boyfreind you were going too fast - that's the usual reason for breathing out of control.

           

          If you're going to follow the C25K, stop running on your off days. Walk briskly, stretch your stride, but stop running extra until you do the 5K. Especially if you're finding it hard enough that you're repeating weeks. The C25K builds gradually for a reason, and part of it is that your body will adapt to the impact and other stresses of running, but it takes time.

           

          On your off days, walking and body weight exercises should be enough for recovery and whole body fitness. No need for a pool membership or anything like that. You can walk to wherever you go, use the stairs instead of the elevator, things like that, but if you want an easy to do workout without any extra gear (other than a bench or chair of some kind to do the dips), here's an example. Ask if the exercise names need explanation.

           

          Don't rest between exercises, but you don't need to attempt breakneck speed. After doing it for a while you can try to do more circuits in the same amount of time, or increase either the number of reps of each exercise or the amount of time.

          1. Walk 100m (brisk walk)

          2. 10 push ups (press ups? I got the impression of UK from your post, I'm not sure why.)

          3. 16 lunges (8 each side)

          4. 10 sit ups or crunches (alternate by set or workout day)

          5. 15 squats

          6. 10 dips

           

          repeat for 20 min

          2013 Goal: Make 3:00:16 go away - FAIL.

          2014 Goal: Make 3:00:16 go away.

          cm91


            Thanks a lot guys, I knew I was most likely just being impatient! On Sunday I went for a long bike ride that gave my legs a decent workout so last night I restricted myself to a fairly short walk with the dog instead of pushing myself to run. My daily commute involves a lot of brisk walking (varying with lateness) so it kind of ruins my day when my legs are exhausted. I will stick to the C25K program as it is intended and try and be patient... I definitely expect more of myself when I'm with my boyfriend because he's so fast and fit, even he tells me to be patient lol.

            I'm Australian actually, but we do read very similar to the UK Smile

              I am not a "runner" but I did complete the Ease to 5 K program. I am very slow at running, but most of the advice that I have gotten is what Harriet said. If you push too hard, you will get so sick of it and tire out. The breathing takes time, when I first started my breathing felt so shallow, I think the walking/running really helps your lungs and muscles gradually work their way up. Patience is definitely something that has been my friend on this running journey. I like running 3-4 miles  at my easy pace, it is a good thing because I can't do much more than that. I just keep hoping that the speed and endurance will build as time goes on.

               

              Just keep at it. I am a student as well.  Last semester, I thought my stress was going to cause a heart attack. I can tell you that this semester has been much better as far a stress and I think the running has everything to do with it. I make time between studying, class and family somehow and it is so worth it.

               

              if you run, you are a runner Smile  there's no "runner" about it!  I agree, fabulous stress relief!  Run on!

              2014 Schedule

              Jan 11 - Mississippi Blues Half, February 23 - Last Chance for Boston Half, March 9 - Charlotte Speedway Half, March 16 - Heart Mini Half, April 6 - ORRRC Half, May 4 - Flying Pig Full, June 14 - Hatfield & McCoy Full, Sept 21 - HITS Omaha Half, Nov 30 - Space Coast Half

                (except a niggling knee issue I suspect is related to old shoes) 

                 

                If you have one in your area, you should go to a running shoe store and have them help you find proper running shoes.  When I started C25K I was running in the wrong kind of shoe for my foot.  After I got new shoes, my feet felt much better.  Prepare to spend about $100-$120 on a decent pair.  Track your shoe mileage on Running Ahead.  I think most people recommend new shoes every 500 miles.

                Started c25k on 5/30/11


                Fat butt on couch

                  If you think your shoes are too old, get new shoes.  You must have faith in your equipment.

                   

                  But #1, be patient with yourself.  Running is a long-term game.  Think in term of months, not days or weeks.  If you feel like you are breathing too fast or working too hard, just slow down.  I don't care if you are running slower than you could walk, just keep at it.  Over time you will be rewarded.

                   

                  You are making strides to improve yourself.  If you are patient you will be rewarded.

                  "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                   

                    If you think your shoes are too old, get new shoes.  You must have faith in your equipment.

                     

                    But #1, be patient with yourself.  Running is a long-term game.  Think in term of months, not days or weeks.  If you feel like you are breathing too fast or working too hard, just slow down.  I don't care if you are running slower than you could walk, just keep at it.  Over time you will be rewarded.

                     

                    You are making strides to improve yourself.  If you are patient you will be rewarded.

                     

                    Agree with alllll that above.

                     

                    The key thing is 'creating the habit", IE.  If you can consistently commit to running 3+ times a week for, say at least 12 weeks, it is virtually guaranteed that you will be capable of quite a bit more after that 12 weeks is up.  Running slower at first is quite fine. :-)

                    The Plan (big parts)→  ///  March:  Shamrock Marathon  ///  April:  24 Hour Run for Cancer  ///   May:  3 Days at the Fair (12 Hour)  ///  Nov:  New York Marathon ∞

                      Not everyone breathes the same while running, ideally you should be able to do a few steps while drawing a breath and a few while exhaling.

                      My so does fast, shallow breathing and is aware of it, but it does not seem to be a problem. He has run many marathons over the eight or nine years he has been running. So it does not have to be a problem, though it is unusual.

                      PBs since age 60:  5k- 24:36, 10k - 47:17. Half Marathon- 1:42:41.

                                                          10 miles (unofficial) 1:16:44.

                       

                      leonasmith1977


                      Addicted to Running

                        I am not a "runner" but I did complete the Ease to 5 K program. I am very slow at running, but most of the advice that I have gotten is what Harriet said. If you push too hard, you will get so sick of it and tire out. The breathing takes time, when I first started my breathing felt so shallow, I think the walking/running really helps your lungs and muscles gradually work their way up. Patience is definitely something that has been my friend on this running journey. I like running 3-4 miles  at my easy pace, it is a good thing because I can't do much more than that. I just keep hoping that the speed and endurance will build as time goes on.

                         

                        Just keep at it. I am a student as well.  Last semester, I thought my stress was going to cause a heart attack. I can tell you that this semester has been much better as far a stress and I think the running has everything to do with it. I make time between studying, class and family somehow and it is so worth it.

                        when i first started running, I also went through the shallow breathing stage. running was a struggle, but with perseverance, I was able to get over that awkward beginners stage.


                        Will run for scenery.

                          All good advice so far.  I'll just add my encouragement to walk.  Runners sometimes (okay, almost always) look down on walking as a "lesser" activity.  But it accomplishes a whole lot of what you as a beginner need to accomplish, and with waaay less risk of injury or burnout.  There's way more to it than aerobic fitness.  All your joints, ligaments, tendons, and even your bones are a little out of shape.  They need gentle amounts of exercise over a long time frame to adapt.  They adapt much slower than muscles, but are just as important.

                           

                          I started as a walker first and a runner much later.  I walked a whole bunch of 5ks before introducing any running.  (And I lost all my excess weight just by walking and tracking calories.)  If you learn to enjoy walking for it's own sake, introducing running at a healthy safe rate is no problem!

                          Stupid feet!

                          Stupid elbow!

                            Almost any kind of activity is good for you if the alternative is "doing nothing". The difficulty comes when you're deciding between e.g. running and walking.

                             

                            But for most people it's really not a choice between the two. You want to try to organise your life so that you spend a bit less time being inactive (sitting in front of the computer or TV; driving your car; etc. etc) and more time doing stuff that involves using your body which can include all sorts of things.

                             

                            For example - there are plenty of people  who do things like  spending 30 mins driving to the gym, another 30 mins driving home in order to run on the treadmill for 20 mins; and then claim they have "no time" to do any more exercise :/

                            leonasmith1977


                            Addicted to Running

                              People would normally want to watch TV than walk the dog around the neighborhood.

                               

                              Exercise is essential for health Smile

                               

                              Exercise once in a while.

                               

                              Love yourself Smile