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Holabird Sports (Read 1338 times)

djtaylor


    I know buying online can save substantial money, but I am still skittish about buying any shoes I'm going to run in without trying them on in a brick and mortar store. Obviously not knocking anybody who does, just doesn't work so well for me. (Although must also admit, I've done so a couple of times with good results from the Warehouse.)

     

    I think most of us are this way.  I try on and buy my first pair of any given model/revision at my local running store.  I pay a bit more, but I like supporting the store and of course being able to try it on first.  All subsequent pairs of that model (if I like it) are bought online.


    Happy Camper

      I know buying online can save substantial money, but I am still skittish about buying any shoes I'm going to run in without trying them on in a brick and mortar store. Obviously not knocking anybody who does, just doesn't work so well for me. (Although must also admit, I've done so a couple of times with good results from the Warehouse.)

       

      No risk really if you know what works for you.  I know unless I am sprinting that I'm pretty neutral with my stride.  I buy neutral shoes. (The wear on your current shoe can tell you much or buy shoes once where you can have a real gait analysis done.  I am less prone to injury if the shoe is lighter weight and flexible as opposed to stiffer with lots of support and cushioning. I worked with form on easy runs to land mid-foot.  I stop using them at 500 miles or so regardless of how worn they look.  Once you have stuff like that worked out, its just a matter of reading product specs and descriptions, a few user reviews and then take advantage of the deals.

      Determination: The feeling you get right before you try something incredibly stupid.

        Here's how I weigh buying locally vs. buying online.

        1. If it's important to me to have the convenience and service of a local dealer, I don't mind paying a little more for their presence.  They are going to have some overhead that a warehouse doesn't have, and that's okay.  If the shop is locally owned rather than a national chain, all the more reason to support it.
        2. We have a local running store that is a huge supporter of running in the community.  They provide financial and logistical support to all the races, give discounts to running clubs, give marathon training classes, etc.  They deserve our business.
        3. I think it's low-class to do one's shopping at the local brick and mortar store, then to buy from someone else.
        4. If I have no particular use for, or loyalty to a local shop, I have no problem buying online.

        Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

        xor


          I do a lot of my buying online.  I go through a bazillion shoes a year.  However, I give some of my business to a couple local stores a like a lot (more specifically, I like their owners/employees a lot).  THAT SAID, I am a referral-generating machine.  I send them a whole ton of "newish runner who needs help" business... and I always send them there with the lesson about shoe prices also factoring in the time/consulting provided by the shoe experts.  Who, since I know the store folks, I know will provide some amount of actual worth-money guidance.

           

          The good shoe stores are smart enough these days to realize that they are providing some service to folks who are then going to buy their stuff cheaper elsewhere... and so part of their service is to develop a relationship that transcends this. And I try to kindly suggest pay-for-the-service to the newbie as well.  I do that because I like the folks, not because I get "a cut".

           

          I SAID ALL THAT TO SAY THE FOLLOWING...

           

          ...meanwhile.... there's a local shoe store here that has become a bit of a funny (both ha ha and strange) joke because the owner seems unnaturally compelled to put everyone in Hokas.  It doesn't matter what kind of running you want to do nor what kind of runner you are nor anything else... you WILL get the hard sell on the damn Hokas.  To the point that you will wonder "??? Is this guy getting a huge payoff from Hoka, or what?"  All Hoka all the time.  Well, that's the past 2-3 years.  Before that, he was all about selling you Scott shoes.

           

          Some stores are better than others.

           

            I SAID ALL THAT TO SAY THE FOLLOWING...

             

            ...meanwhile.... there's a local shoe store here that has become a bit of a funny (both ha ha and strange) joke because the owner seems unnaturally compelled to put everyone in Hokas.  It doesn't matter what kind of running you want to do nor what kind of runner you are nor anything else... you WILL get the hard sell on the damn Hokas.  To the point that you will wonder "??? Is this guy getting a huge payoff from Hoka, or what?"  All Hoka all the time.  Well, that's the past 2-3 years.  Before that, he was all about selling you Scott shoes.

             

            Some stores are better than others.

             

             

             

             

             

            Not sure why, but this comes to mind when I hear Hoka...

            And you can quote me as saying I was mis-quoted. Groucho Marx

             

            Rob

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