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Achilles Tendonitis Options: Tenex Procedure - PRP Injection (Read 123 times)

Blaf


    I do not know what to tell you…

     

    I ran every day from Thursday last week until Tuesday this week including tempo run on Tuesday night. No big issues. Than I took Wednesday off. Now, on Thursday morning, I feel weird dull pain level 2 on scale 1 to 10 around the tendon going up toward the calf. It is not even pain, more like something is happening around tendon, there is a process going on, that is hard to describe.

     

    I am going for another tonight, a bit faster too and see what happens. Like you guys said before, it is not a good idea to skip days.

    yomonk1


      Have any of you heard about, or experienced use of Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) patches for tendon issues? Wondering if this would be beneficial.

      yomonk1


        Have any of you heard about, or experienced use of Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) patches for tendon issues? Wondering if this would be beneficial.

          Have any of you heard about, or experienced use of Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) patches for tendon issues? Wondering if this would be beneficial.

           

          Interesting, that may actually help a bit. At least it sounds like it on paper. There may be other methods of capillary dilation and blood thinning that would have the same effect. I think nicotine dilates the blood vessels, and we know that an aspirin will thin the blood.

           

          So, start smoking and popping aspirin!

           

          The patches are not localized, they are just a slow release of drugs into the body, so don't get the idea to apply them to the achilles and expect better results than applying them to your shoulder! Nitrites/nitrates are also found in some processed meats, like hot dogs. I don't know if dietary works the same way as absorbed. And then there are the other less desirable qualities, just like with acquiring nicotine via smoking.

           

          If you're desperate and don't mind invasive work; steroid injections and blood platelet therapy have shown promise.

          55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

            I read a few pages on the Tenex, and it sounds like the right thing to do if you've been having problems for a long time, along with thickening/lump. According to the places that do it, it's the best thing ever. I didn't stumble across a third-party impartial review of the procedure, nor a review by an athlete. I didn't do specific searches.

             

            If I continue to have issues, I'll look into doing Tenex next Winter, so the 2 months of recovery are when I don't want to run anyway. And if my insurance covers it. It seems like I'm the prime candidate for it, because I have thickening of the tendon and it's been ongoing for about 5 years since initial injury. It is apparently not for people who have just suffered an achilles injury, but for people who have had chronic issues after the inflammation has ended.

            55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

              As a follow up, I am continuing a second round of the shock therapy and seeing a substantial reduction in achilles scar tissue.  At the same time, I just picked up my first pair of Hoka's (after many years of Saucony Kinvaras - which I LOVED).  I am finding that after running with the Hokas (just some shorter, easier runs so far), I am not experiencing the tightening in the calves and the pain/tearing that I usually feel with the Kinvaras, so might be on to something here.  Cautiously optimistic for now.

              2018 Goals

              Figure out the achilles thing...... and THEN try to get running regularly again.

              No racing goals 

               

              yomonk1


                As a follow up, I am continuing a second round of the shock therapy and seeing a substantial reduction in achilles scar tissue.  At the same time, I just picked up my first pair of Hoka's (after many years of Saucony Kinvaras - which I LOVED).  I am finding that after running with the Hokas (just some shorter, easier runs so far), I am not experiencing the tightening in the calves and the pain/tearing that I usually feel with the Kinvaras, so might be on to something here.  Cautiously optimistic for now.

                 

                By shock therapy, are you referring to E-Stim? I've been doing that with relatively little relief. What are you doing specifically?

                 

                As far as shoes, I moved from the Hoka Bondi 5 to the Arahi for mild pronation. Wondering if I need to go further to the Gaviota?

                Blaf


                  Here is a post from a guy from Facebook Achilles Tendonitis group. Some of you might find it useful what worked for him:

                   

                  An update on my previous posts from February 2nd. The previous was that I'd just managed a slow 15 minute run on the treadmill after being out with AT for 8 weeks. 
                  Fast forward 2 weeks to yesterday and I actually managed a full 5 mile run outdoors, my first since I picked up the injury in December.
                  10 weeks for AT recovery is pretty quick, I'm aware of that but as a reminder, when I got the injury I couldn't walk without a heavy limp for 3 weeks. I even used crutches. I was convinced I had a partial tear at times. In fact, I have scar tissue/lump right where the injury is/was which I massage every night so it is possible it could have been a partial tear early on (although unlikely).
                  Anyway, I truly believe eccentric exercises combined with stretching and calf strengthening exercises dramatically speeds up the recovery process - you have to do these religiously! But there is something else which may have also helped me. 
                  I have read many, many posts, tips and advice column regarding the injury but only a couple advised me that I should actually be running/jogging (albeit very, very slowly and reducing distance massively) but ONLY if I no longer had a limp. 
                  The theory was that by resting the Achilles, you are not doing anything to help strengthen it. The Achilles is damaged because it was overworked or overloaded (usually) so you have to "re-train" the Achilles to be able to carry weight again. By resting it continuously it will just waste away eventually.
                  As a "runner" this struck a chord with me...
                  I had been doing the eccentric exercises and seen good progress but the real progress I found was when I started running again! They also mentioned that you will feel slight pain when you begin running but this is all part of the recovery. The trick is to not overdo it. 
                  Anyway, next Sunday will be 11 weeks since I got the injury and also I am due to run a half marathon, it was one I'd signed up for last year. 
                  It is risky and I've had many people telling me that I should maybe "re-think" this but I feel pretty good in myself, I have another 9 days or so to prepare. I also plan on doing 10 miles this Saturday, which will be a real test for my Achilles and will show me whether I'm realistically ready for next week.

                  Hopefully this will give further hope to people struggling and who cannot see an end in sight. Even if you don't run/never have I'm convinced that going for a gentle jog outside or even on a treadmill will be a huge help!

                  yomonk1


                    I am also back! Starting slow though. Easy 3 miler yesterday with relatively little pain. I rested completely for 2 weeks. No stairs, no running, no stretching. Icing it down, Advil 3xday, compression sleeves, cross friction massage, and modified myofascial release (with back of a butter knife and some salve) Lump on tendon is gone, swelling gone, tenderness gone. Thanks goodness. Now to just ease back into the mileage. Slow steady mileage gain and no hill work for a couple of weeks.

                    Doing what I can to get prepared, have the Blue Ridge Half Marathon coming up in April. Very long hills. Challenging course. "Toughest Road Course in America" Trying not to re injure.

                       

                      By shock therapy, are you referring to E-Stim? I've been doing that with relatively little relief. What are you doing specifically?

                       

                      As far as shoes, I moved from the Hoka Bondi 5 to the Arahi for mild pronation. Wondering if I need to go further to the Gaviota?

                       

                      I haven't heard the term E-Stim, but this webpage essentially explains what I have been having done http://www.perfectbalanceclinic.com/blog/injury-and-treatment-advice/shockwave-therapy-for-achilles-tendonitis/    It is almost like a little jackhammer on the achilles that works to break up scar tissue and get some blood flowing.

                       

                      It definitely seems to be working for me.  Also doing the eccentric calf loading because although the shock therapy is reducing the thickness and scar tissue, the underlying tendon is still quite weak and needs work!

                      2018 Goals

                      Figure out the achilles thing...... and THEN try to get running regularly again.

                      No racing goals 

                       

                      yomonk1


                         

                        I haven't heard the term E-Stim, but this webpage essentially explains what I have been having done http://www.perfectbalanceclinic.com/blog/injury-and-treatment-advice/shockwave-therapy-for-achilles-tendonitis/    It is almost like a little jackhammer on the achilles that works to break up scar tissue and get some blood flowing.

                         

                        It definitely seems to be working for me.  Also doing the eccentric calf loading because although the shock therapy is reducing the thickness and scar tissue, the underlying tendon is still quite weak and needs work!

                         

                        Oh, Wow! That actually "looks" very therapeutic, as it applies to what I've been researching for treatment. No, certainly not E-stim. E-stim is mild electric pulsations that contact the musculature around the tendon and increase overall bloodflow. Different, but still effective.  I guess as similar as I've experienced to your shockwave is the manual cross friction massage that aims to accomplish the same goals of tendon fiber reorganization.

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