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Ran in snow tonight, shins hurt (Read 199 times)

    About 2" freshies on the off-road trail. 26F and stormy, so I wore a coat and Muck boots. They are light and cover the ankle. They fit good, no slipping in them.

     

    My calves hurt while running. I think the soles are too flat, so the front of my foot was doing more work to break over, each stride. That hurt my calves. Not so much ouch, but more just could feel them working harder, getting sore.

     

    Then my shins started to feel tired. After 2 miles I slowed to a walk for a mile. Then came in.

     

    My guess is I'm just using muscles not used to it, with the snow, and the boots. I'll try sneakers next time, but as the snow gets deeper, I will be wearing boots. Maybe gore-tex hiking boots that cover the ankle, or maybe these neoprene Muck boots.

     

    I'm always on the edge of having shin splints develop. Had them decades ago in track. Currently just run trails, 3 to 5 miles a couple times a week, plus one soccer game a week. The soccer never seems to bother the shins. Last time I ran at the locsl HS track, they hurt, so I'm not doing that much. My only roads will be the occassional 5k race, which I haven't done yet. My hope is my shin muscles will strengthen for the snowy trail running. Soon it will be 6" or more, thus the boots. If no snow, and just cold, I'd wear sneakers. Tonight was crappy out, and a test for what is to come.

      I wouldn't run in anything except running shoes. Muck boots are not made for running. (I just looked at some pictures to see exactly what your were referring to.) The foot isn't allowed to do its thing.

       

      I just did a short run today, but about 1.5hrs (not quite 4 mi, 600ft) in a couple inches of fresh snow on trails at about 27F. We haven't had enough snow for a decent base yet, so it's still sorta slogging. I wore my regular running shoes with neoprene overbooties (optional as far as temperatures were concerned; I use Crescent Moon, but there's brands for both snowshoeing and mtn biking) and Kahtoola microspikes. On top, I wore a light insulating layer and a shell.

       

      In a prior lifetime, I was a field vegetation ecologist where we wore hiking boots, knee high mud boots, hip boots, whatever, sometimes for many hours. As I got older, my feet and ankles rebelled and had AT sufficiently badly that I could barely walk at times (before I started running). On 2nd trip to PT (different than one I started with), he did a gait and full body analysis. He put me in stability running shoes (rather than mc) and gave me foot and ankle strengthening. I was close to retirement anyway, so I could dispense with all my work boots. When I finally allowed my feet to function, they did and haven't had AT problems since.

       

      I know AT isn't shin splints, but I still can't imagine wanting to run in something like that. Unless you're talking about something different, since the pictures I saw from google looked fairly heavy relative to a running shoe. (sorry, but my feet hurt just reading your post)

       

      I would agree that some of the issue may be not using those muscles before, and you need to adapt slowly. You didn't indicate how much experience you had with running. But everyone I know - including the winter ultra runners - just use running shoes to run.

       

      Good luck.

      "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog


      Needs more cowbell!

        I've done "runs" where I've post-holed for several miles in snow 6" or deeper…which on my short legs can be nearly knee-deep.  I wear regular running shoes and merino socks.  Never occurred to me to wear boots.  That sounds awful.  If traction is a concern I'll throw YakTrax on my shoes.

         

        A couple of days ago I ran in my first significant snow.  My big toes really hurt for the past couple of days.  This happens every year.  Running in snow is hard work, but wearing boots to run sounds really miserable and likely to cause other issues.

        Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

        '14 Goals:

        • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

          Similar, if not exactly, these boots, http://www.rods.com/the-jobber-by-muck-boots.html

           

          But the running shoe cover seems an interesting idea. What brand/model works good?

           

          I am losing weight, from 225 to now 190, heading to my goal of 165. Haven't run much since HS track/XC, 30 yrs ago. Been slowly adding more miles as the weight comes off from diet. Other than my visit to a track about 3 weeks ago, I run slow and easy. When I was heavier, I started just walking, and waited till I got closer to 200 to jog. Been since about September that I started the jogging. Now at 190, and if no snow, can do 1 mile at 9:30 pace, or 3 at 12:00 pace, or 5 at 14:00 pace.

           

          Just don't want to go off schedule during winter. I don't care about pace in snow, as long as I can get in about a 50 minute workout running or slogging through or XC skiing or snowshoing, or whatever the conditions allow. The trail will not be plowed, so will be variable and challenging. But I will go out there and do 1 to 5 miles twice or three times a week no matter the weather. Plus the 1 day a week of indoor soccer. Plus calisthenics on the off days. One day will be complete rest. Each week losing 1 or 2 pounds on diet.


          Needs more cowbell!

            But the running shoe cover seems an interesting idea. What brand/model works good?

             

            I have the Pro model…now they have an actual Run model that looks like it would be more comfortable under the forefoot.

            Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

            '14 Goals:

            • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

            • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

              Similar, if not exactly, these boots, http://www.rods.com/the-jobber-by-muck-boots.html

               

              But the running shoe cover seems an interesting idea. What brand/model works good?...

              Yea, those boots don't look too comfortable for running.

               

              The overbooties I'm using now are from Crescent Moon - toward bottom of page. You should be able to find those in some outdoor stores - local or online. My original ones were for mtn biking (actually for a winter triathlon in about 0F and I was desperate) and found them in a local bike shop. They were about 3 mm while my CM ones are about 5mm thick. 3mm worked for most of my runs, but 5 mm was nice on some.

               

              NEOS overshoes are another type, but they're more like boots - great for around town when want to wear something to keep feet dry while getting from car to building, then taking boot off and still having shoes on underneath.

              "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog

                Instead of running in the boots more, I just bought a pair of Brooks Adrenaline with Gore-Tex.  First outing was last night.  17F, 2" snow on hardpack, plus a snowstorm coming down. They worked perfect!  I wasn't sore, and my feet stayed dry and comfy.

                 

                At some point, at over 4" of loose over the hardpack probably, I might go with boots and a fast stomp around.  But there's lots of winter running to be done between 0" and 4" of snow Smile

                 

                One nice thing I knew was going to happen with Gore-tex, aside from hopefully being waterproof, is that they are much more wind resistant.  Thus in temps under 20F, they will be more comfy.  Under 0F, I don't know, probably boots time then Smile

                  I can't recommend the Runs enough for snowy/icy roads.  I did a tempo run on mostly-ice-covered asphalt in them and, while a bit slower than usual, felt confident the whole time.  I wouldn't recommend that unless you're confident and have run in them a lot, but the are AWESOME.  I wear fairly thin shoes, and they are comfortable as heck.  I've run up to 20 miles in them.

                   

                   

                  I have the Pro model…now they have an actual Run model that looks like it would be more comfortable under the forefoot.

                  "When a person trains once, nothing happens. When a person forces himself to do a thing a hundred or a thousand times, then he certainly has developed in more ways than physical. Is it raining? That doesn't matter. Am I tired? That doesn't matter, either. Then willpower will be no problem." 
                  Emil Zatopek

                    I can't recommend the Runs enough for snowy/icy roads.  I did a tempo run on mostly-ice-covered asphalt in them and, while a bit slower than usual, felt confident the whole time.  I wouldn't recommend that unless you're confident and have run in them a lot, but the are AWESOME.  I wear fairly thin shoes, and they are comfortable as heck.  I've run up to 20 miles in them.

                     

                     

                    The only time I've had an issue with Yaktrax RUN is when running on packable snow, they tend to collect a layer of snow just thick enough to render the front spikes useless; beyond that, they're great.

                      If studs or cleats collect snow, try spraying the metal parts with Pam (cooking spray). This is usually only a problem in warmer temperatures.

                       

                      This is one of the things I like about the kahtoola microspikes - their spikes are long enough to dig into the snow. (for hard ice, I use a slip-on device with studs).

                      "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog

                        If studs or cleats collect snow, try spraying the metal parts with Pam (cooking spray). This is usually only a problem in warmer temperatures.

                         

                        This is one of the things I like about the kahtoola microspikes - their spikes are long enough to dig into the snow. (for hard ice, I use a slip-on device with studs).

                         

                        The Pam solution only seems to work for shorter duration runs, and yes, the issue only shows up when the OAT is waffeling a few degrees either side of freezing.  I have yet to try Kahtoola micro spikes, but they sound great.  Smile

                           

                          The Pam solution only seems to work for shorter duration runs, and yes, the issue only shows up when the OAT is waffeling a few degrees either side of freezing.  I have yet to try Kahtoola micro spikes, but they sound great.  Smile

                          Microspikes are the footwear of choice around here. I won't say 100% of the people on trails are using them, but I can't remember seeing anyone without them (well, other than the dog walkers near the trailhead). If you look at pictures of Geoff Roes and Anton Krupicka et al. running in CO winter, you'll see the red cradle on their feet (at least the pictures from a couple years ago).

                           

                          We're short on snow but not on freezing rain, so something to punch through the ice crust on top has been helpful. Yesterday, I wore my studs to get from car to eye doctors office about 50 ft away because of sloped, icy parking lot.

                          "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog


                          Cheap and Evil Girl

                            I own a pair of Muck boots.  I wouldn't want to walk two miles in them, let alone run!  You are hardcore.

                             

                            i just wear heavy wool socks and my regular running shoes.  Gaiters if the snow is over the top of my shoe, Stabilicers for traction.  The only downside to Stabilicers is that they are heavy, but since you can run in Muck boots, I don't think that will be a problem for you Wink

                            I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT I AM DOING.  

                             

                            "Mental toughness is built by doing something that is hard over and over again, especially when you don't feel like doing it. Our society has conditioned us to believe that there should be no discomfort, to stop when we are uncomfortable. But the discomfort we feel when we're doing a challenging workout is an important part of the strengthening process." -Jim Afremow, The Champion's Mind: How Great Athletes Think, Train, and Thrive

                              I own a pair of Muck boots.  I wouldn't want to walk two miles in them, let alone run!  You are hardcore.

                               

                              i just wear heavy wool socks and my regular running shoes.  Gaiters if the snow is over the top of my shoe, Stabilicers for traction.  The only downside to Stabilicers is that they are heavy, but since you can run in Muck boots, I don't think that will be a problem for you Wink

                               

                              My Muck boots (Tack model) stay in and around the barn, period, full stop, the end.  Smile


                              Fat butt on couch

                                I've run winters in areas that get 400" of snow annually in nothing but normal running shoes.  Everything from ankle-deep slush to over the knees up a ski slope.  Cotton socks, no less.  Perhaps I was too young to know better but other than clearing the packed snow around my ankles every few miles I had no real issues.

                                 

                                Stick with your regular running shoes.  You will be fine.

                                "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                                 

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