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My hello, and questions of (refinding) motivation. (Read 723 times)

    Peeked about occasionally, but never really bothered to post a 'hi.' I'm someone who's trying to get back into running rather than get into running I suppose. I ran in high school, and did a quick tour in college too before blowing out my ACL. It's been a couple years now since replacement, and I'm trying to start logging some more serious mileage again, lose a couple pounds, and...well unfortunately get back to where I was. It seems the wrong way to think about it, but (despite all the other things I want to spend time doing) probably the biggest hurdle is that I know where I used to be when I lettered in college, and I know about where I am now...and well obviously there's a pretty wide gap. It's pretty tough to stay motivated to get out there and log some miles when a) doing 50-60 miles a week would wreck me right now and that's what it used to be, and b) the 3 minutes a mile pace gap looms over me. So has anyone else ever been just completely blindsided by serious injury (at least, that's what ACL reconstruction ended up being for me) and life? And if so, how'd you find your way back? Most days I have trouble seeing that path of motivation. I'm not entirely sure what happened today, or where the 8 miles of feeling great came from, but maybe there's hope for me yet, who knows. I sure hope so, lest I never find my way to run Boston.


    ~J


    You'll ruin your knees!

      Well howdy! Follow my first few posts at http://www.runningahead.com/frm_topic.aspx?id=a96fa29854314f99aa944e04b89bd2a1. Long story short, first ACL snapped playing softball, reconstructive surgery 9 months of intensive rehab in 1988. Dr said run-no-mo! No serious running and in 1994, bang! The other ACL snaps during a soccer drill with my 10 yo son's soccer team (I call it a coaching injury). In 2002, I decided to start back and spent 6 months hating every painful step! It wasn't until I found a training group that I could "measure-up" with that I stopped comparing my pitiful self to my old 40 minute 10K memories! After a few months with the group, I was running back to back marathons, then ultras. I finished my first 100 miler this past Feb and am looking for more (the above post began more than a year ago). Look for a group and stay focused on the future, not the past! Find an accountability partner in running and support each other, whatever it takes. Measure your tomorrow against your today, not your years ago! Good luck and keep us posted on your progress...lots of support here (and just a little bit of silliness). There are lots more "8 miles of feeling great" out there! You can do more than you think you can, you are capable of more than you think you are! Lynn B

      ""...the truth that someday, you will go for your last run. But not today—today you got to run." - Matt Crownover (after Western States)

        I had ACL reconstruction about 2 years ago. It really reshapes how you think about movement!!! I would add that when you've been hurt or have been out of exercising for a good while you get a bonus that people who have been running straight don't get... you get to hit the "reset" button on all your PR's!!! That's right! Those PR's belonged to a different runner in a different life. You've got a brand new clean slate! So wherever you're at now, that's your starting point. Each time you do something you've not done since the operation - like race a particular distance - that's your new PR! I would encourage you to join us over on the "Virtual" race group at http://www.runningahead.com/groups/virtual when you're interested in some on-line "racing" company. For the most part we're not that fast, though there are a few hares in our group! Welcome to RunningAHEAD!!! Janell

        Roads were made for journeys...

          Sustained an injury playing basketball when the ship pulled into port in Rhodes, Greece. I completely obliterated my ACL (it wasn't even visible on the MRI) and my MCL almost blew out too. They replaced my ACL in 1997 and cut my MCL to shorten it because it was so stretched out and loose and then they reattached the MCL. It was about 9 months later when I finally felt like I might be able to do some running, so I started coaching youth soccer. It felt weird at first getting out there and sometimes felt a little unstable because my muscles had to adapt to it. I started rollerblading because it used different leg muscles and I didn't have the pressure of the pounding from running. When I transferred to another ship I found out they were starting a rollerhockey league so I joined up. I played rollerhockey fairly regularly until 9/11 happened, then a lot of people I played with had to deploy. The end of July is when I really started getting into a running routine. Started out just doing a mile and a half, now I'm up to running 5 miles. Stability hasn't been an issue since I started being active after the surgery. The muscles will adapt to provide the extra stability you need. I just completed my first ever 5K at the end of August, may try and work up to a half marathon next September. Jim
            Look for a group and stay focused on the future, not the past!...Measure your tomorrow against your today, not your years ago!
            As a rational being, it all makes sense, though it's hard to do sometimes. Moving from a smaller city where the community was splintered and competative to one where there are disparate groups all around has been a bit of a trip. I'm working on it, though most of what I see through casual searching has consisted of things a little too far away for it to be really very convenient, or a little to fast and far for it to really fit well with where I'm at. The move is still pretty recent too, so I'm working on it. My only accountability buddy at the moment a couple thousand miles away and needs the running coach that is somewhere inside me too much for it to really count.
            That's right! Those PR's belonged to a different runner in a different life. You've got a brand new clean slate! So wherever you're at now, that's your starting point. Each time you do something you've not done since the operation - like race a particular distance - that's your new PR!
            I think I probably should just start forking over a little $$ to ease into the occasional race. It definitely helps me a lot to see other people running, especially coming from a team background more than a solitary one. Trying to forget old times and put together new ones is tricky, and so far the feeling has been a lot more like "Why race now when all it will confirm is where I'm not at?" though that's not really very satisfying.


            ~J


            You'll ruin your knees!

              "I'm working on it, though most of what I see through casual searching has consisted of things a little too far away for it to be really very convenient, or a little to fast and far for it to really fit well with where I'm at." Ok, let's see. If you haven't already... http://www.fleetfeetbaltimore.com/...check out their information on the Galloway program. This may be one of the best beginner groups around. You don't have to drink the koolaid, just go along until you are ready to move on...I stayed with them for 2 years...still keep in touch. There are other Galloway resources in your area...check out http://www.runinjuryfree.com/training_groups/list_cities.html Maryland running clubs...http://www.marylandrunning.com/clubs/ and http://www.runningnetwork.com/clubs/maryland.html Don't assume that all the groups are too fast/too far for you. In my experience, there may be a "core" that sticks to the posted speed/distance, but there are always some that like the shorter/slower options. Email the club contacts and ask what options they have for the speed/distance you are looking for! You don't have anything to lose! Also, bet your buddy online here at Running Ahead so you can take turns kicking each other's respective butts when you get lazy! Rots o ruck! Lynn

              ""...the truth that someday, you will go for your last run. But not today—today you got to run." - Matt Crownover (after Western States)

                Ditto to everything Lynn said above. I'm a true believer in Galloway's ideas for beginners - or for anyone coming back from an injury - or for anybody just not wanting to be injured at all! You obviously ain't a beginner, at least in terms of knowledge. But I think his approach is remarkable for coming back slowly, and doing it right. It's too easy for formerly fast runners to try too hard, too fast, and then give up. My whole running life has been a series of patterns of getting into it, working too hard and fast, getting injured, and forgetting it for a few years. I credit Galloway's books with giving me a year of injury free running, and getting me really psychologically motivated to keep doing it forever. It just seems to me that at this point, your main goal should be to forget about times and PRs, and get back to running just for the sake of running - because you love it and it makes you feel good. I'm sure you'll be flying past me in no time at all. (But not if you get unmotivated ... or hurt!) Good luck to you!
                E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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