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Is a sub 4 hour possible? (Read 109 times)

    Hi everyone!

     

    I am a 35 year old female and my goal this year is to run a sub 4 hour marathon. My last (and first) marathon was in August 2018 and I ran it in 4:26. Post marathon, I didn't have any soreness whatsoever, which makes me wonder if I could have gone faster although I felt pretty dead at the end. For that training cycle I was running on average 27 miles per week. I don't feel like I can rely on recent race times because they have been 5k's and 10k's (and I am definitely faster at shorter distances)

     

    My question is, I have a marathon coming up at the end of April this year, is it too much of a stretch to think I could run a 3:55?

    -Pain is temporary, internet results last forever!

    http://www.runderfulmama.com

    Running Problem


    Problem Child

      How many miles have you been running training for this April marathon?

      Any recent race results we could look at? Shorter times could still help narrow down what's possible. August 2018 to April 2020 is a long time.

      What race is it? Running Revel Mt Charleston might be slightly easier to run sub 4 Pikes Peak. Neither of those are in April. One is uphill for the first half and 4 hours is probably close to first place.

       

      Also, you could jump into the marathon training thread if you wanted.

      Many of us aren't sure what the hell point you are trying to make and no matter how we guess, it always seems to be something else. Which usually means a person is doing it on purpose.

      flyrunnr


        I'm going to say probably not, unless you give us some indication of your current fitness and training, OR if you cut the course. Smile

        https://www.strava.com/athletes/2507437

        PR's - 5K - 17:57 (2017) | 10K - 38:06 (2016)  | 13.1 1:23:55 (2019)  | 26.2  2:58:46 (2017)

        2020 Goals - Sub-2:55 Marathon                       Up Next: TBD, Boston on 9/14?

         

          It's not too much of a stretch. Your 5k and 10k times indicate 2 things: 1.) you have the potential to run 3:55, and 2.) your limiting factor is your aerobic base. You just need to run more, and it looks like you know that based on your current training and plan.

           

          I think the Hanson's plan you're following is very likely to get you there if you stay healthy.

          Runners run.

            How many miles have you been running training for this April marathon?

            Any recent race results we could look at? Shorter times could still help narrow down what's possible. August 2018 to April 2020 is a long time.

            What race is it? Running Revel Mt Charleston might be slightly easier to run sub 4 Pikes Peak. Neither of those are in April. One is uphill for the first half and 4 hours is probably close to first place.

             

            Also, you could jump into the marathon training thread if you wanted.

             

            I am doing the Hanson Beginner Marathon Plan which will average about 40 miles per week over the course of 18 weeks, peaking at 55 miles per week. Prior to this plan, I hadn't run more than 36 miles in one week.

             

            My 2 most recent races were 5k - 24:10 and a half 1:55:24. Both of these were prior to my increased training load.

             

            I think I'm a little intimidated by the marathon training thread. Everyone there seems to be gunning for a sub 3

            -Pain is temporary, internet results last forever!

            http://www.runderfulmama.com

            Cyberic


              I also think you seen to be training right, but the marathon needs more mileage than what you were running, and that explains, at least partly, why you seem to be faster at shorter distances. I checked your calendar and if you do that whole training, you definitely will improve your marathon PR by a lot. 55 miles weeks with a 16 mile LR will make a big difference IMO.

              Proud run commuter since 2017

              DavePNW


                 

                I am doing the Hanson Beginner Marathon Plan which will average about 40 miles per week over the course of 18 weeks, peaking at 55 miles per week. Prior to this plan, I hadn't run more than 36 miles in one week.

                 

                My 2 most recent races were 5k - 24:10 and a half 1:55:24. Both of these were prior to my increased training load.

                 

                 

                That plan should get you there*, if you can stay healthy with this kind of mileage increase. Is there another half you can run 4-8 weeks before the marathon, to see where your fitness is? Of course everyone’s correlation is different, but when I ran a 3:55 marathon my half time was 1:45. FWIW.

                 

                *eventually. The other thing to keep in mind is that there’s only so much improvement you can get from one strong training cycle - gains come over longer periods of time, with continued accumulated mileage. Think about repeating the same cycle in the summer and targeting a fall marathon too, for another go at it.

                Dave

                Running Problem


                Problem Child

                   

                  I am doing the Hanson Beginner Marathon Plan which will average about 40 miles per week over the course of 18 weeks, peaking at 55 miles per week. Prior to this plan, I hadn't run more than 36 miles in one week.

                   

                  My 2 most recent races were 5k - 24:10 and a half 1:55:24. Both of these were prior to my increased training load.

                   

                  I think I'm a little intimidated by the marathon training thread. Everyone there seems to be gunning for a sub 3

                   

                  I LOVE the Hanson plan. Hanson training helped me PR multiple times. It was the first training plan I followed other than a Garmin plan and I just used it for CIM. a 1:55 half combined with a good Hanson cycle for the right marathon can get you some good results. I'm kind of a big Hanson fanboy and I'm goin to say it's probably because the 16 mile long runs were MUCH better mentally than 20s, I could get my Tuesday training in for the speed on lunch at work, and the Thursday runs built confidence in my race pace. It's also a great opportunity to try gels, clothes, and anything you'll want to test for race day. 10 miles at marathon pace sounds intimidating and 16 miles sounds like not enough for a marathon if you talk to some people. I'll tell you I entered that plan and fully embraced their "just do it our way ONE time and if we're wrong we'll admit it, but we won't be wrong" approach. I read that book cover to cover a few times and highlighted a lot in there. I also rode the struggle bus HARD in my first marathon with plenty of walking, hitting the wall, and cliché marathon finish.

                   

                  Also, I live in the same town as you. I think I've seen you at a few Sunday runs. You can either message me, or try and find me at a local run. If you're on Strava I'm the guy who says "that time _____" for my runs. I'm chatty and if you need some company for those 10-16 mile runs I can probably talk the entire time.

                   

                  Don't worry about their speed in the marathon thread. They might be faster but it doesn't mean they train differently. Just faster. 12x400 is still 12x400m. There is a LOT of knowledge in there and I've benefited from it for the past 3+ years. I think DavePNW remembers when I was aiming for a 3:30. I will say...there can be a lot of random banter you can ignore and as long as you are active in the thread with training and paces you'll get out what you put in. I learned about listening to my body for pacing feedback, keeping a focus on a training run, Maurten gels, and plenty of other things from that thread. It might have worked like an accountability group for me when people could see my runs, along with provide some insight/feedback on training runs. I still self identify as a 3:56 marathoner. I also said when I run Boston I could quit running and I never wanted to run a marathon when I said it.

                  Many of us aren't sure what the hell point you are trying to make and no matter how we guess, it always seems to be something else. Which usually means a person is doing it on purpose.