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sub 20 min 5k (Read 2535 times)


I've got a fever...

    If you run at a steady pace, your heart rate will always creep upward, no matter what the pace. This is called "cardiac drift." The faster the pace, the more it drifts upward, but even at an "easy" pace, it will always climb over the course of a run. This is why you have to slow down as you go in order to maintain a given target heart rate, as in these MAF tests. And that's one reason why I don't think that I personally could run like this. On non-speed days (which is every day these days due to my strained calf and the hot weather), I prefer to run at a steady pace, and maybe finish slightly faster, just to keep used to the idea of steady pacing / negative splits when it comes time to race. I don't enjoy slowing down as I go. I do think that there's plenty of merit to some aspects of the MAF training, particularly the idea of keeping easy days easy and aerobic base-building. I had a coach who told me no speedwork until you're up to at least 40~45 miles per week, and it was because he wanted me to build a sufficient aerobic base. My MAF target is 149 bpm. On most of my easy days, my average heart rate over the course of a run is around 151. I figure, given that cardiac drift is a given, if my average HR for the run is close to MAF, then it's been sufficiently easy. I'm not going to fight cardiac drift and slow down as I go. Mind you, I'm not being a contrarian about aerobic base building or MAF training -- I just prefer to run a steady pace by feel and to not worry about feeling the need to decrease my speed as I go. But I still keep on eye on HR on easy days just to be sure they stay easy.

    On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

    Mishka


      Eddy...the dropoff in your per-mile MAF splits suggests (and confirms what others have said) you have a lot of opportunity to maximize your aerobic potential. As a comparison, here's a sample of MAF tests I did a few years ago: May 5, 65 degrees F, 16 sec differential from first to last mile Jun 13, 65 degrees F, 6 sec differential from first to last mile Aug 15, 85 degrees F, 15 sec differential from first to last mile * All tests were over 5 miles I had a great aerobic base for all of those tests and my fitness peaked in late-August to early-September. This kind of test, assuming you are strict in sticking to the same HR, provides excellent feedback about your aerobic progression over time. It's a good training session at the same time, so you're not sacrificing valuable training time by doing this test every so often. As Jeff mentioned above, I wouldn't focus on doing most of your training runs like this. It's just a good means of obtaining feedback on the development of your aerobic base from time to time.
      Ed4


      Barefoot and happy

        I don't enjoy slowing down as I go.
        There's an alternative to slowing down. Choose your pace so that your heart rate starts out lower than your limit, and only approaches the limit as it drifts upward near the end of your workout. Anyway, at this point I don't experience a lot of drift. It's only really noticeable to me on runs over 10 miles, or in very hot weather.
        Curious about running barefoot? Visit the new barefoot running group.
          And let me hereby anoint Jeff my spokesperson. He says what I'm trying to say, only better and without my tendency to rile and offend. Smile
          Mikey crabby = will ya just quit talking about running and go run already ? except not as nicely Wink Mike, your patience in answering old questions repeatedly is appreciated Smile Especially with Jeff as your interpreter Big grin

          Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the number of moments that take our breath away...(unkown)




          Go With The Flow
          Thyroid Support Group

          Ed4


          Barefoot and happy

            Here's a followup on heart rate drift. Today I did a 10.9 mile run at my usual 145 heart rate. I took splits at a few known landmarks: First 2 miles -- 9:18 pace (avg HR only 134 due to slowly warming up) 2 mi to 4.7 mi -- 9:10 pace 4.7 mi to 8.9 mi -- 9:11 pace 8.9 mi to 10.9 mi -- 9:26 pace So you can see that my drift is pretty minor, and doesn't really become noticeable until after 9 miles. In comparison, a month ago my pace drifted from around 9:00 to over 10:00 on this same course.
            Curious about running barefoot? Visit the new barefoot running group.
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