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Should I take a neutral or stability shoe? (Read 48 times)

theateist


    I went to a few shoe stores and they did a 3D scan of my feet and recommended me a neutral shoe like "Hoka Clifton 8".
    I did mention to them that the inward side of the sole of all my walking RIGHT shoes are worn more than the outward side. If I look from the above, the left side of the sole, the one closer to the opposite shoe, is worn more than the right side. Despite this they told me that based on the scans and how I walk I do not have over/under pronation and I still need a neutral running shoe. How is this possible?


    an amazing likeness

      Likely not all that much correlation in your walking gait wear versus running gait...you can take their advice or not, that's your call.

       

      Buy whatever shoe you want to use...if you're right or wrong you'll know it by how your selection impacts your running, not by wear pattern.

      Acceptable at a dance, invaluable in a shipwreck.

      theateist


        What do you mean "Buy whatever shoe you want to use"? There is a reason why there are different types of shoes - netural, stability, motion. If I need stability but I'll buy neutral I might harm myself in the long run.


        an amazing likeness

          What do you mean "Buy whatever shoe you want to use"? There is a reason why there are different types of shoes - netural, stability, motion. If I need stability but I'll buy neutral I might harm myself in the long run.

           

          I mean it is your choice -- you can take the advice offered by multiple running stores (you note going to a few), recommending neutral, or choose to go to a motion control shoe. Most runners are well served by neutral shoes. If the shoes you pick don't work well for you, stop running in them and go another direction.

          Acceptable at a dance, invaluable in a shipwreck.

          darkwave


          Mother of Cats

            a) As noted, walking and running are different.

            b) I would not put much, if any, faith in shoe store "scans."

             

            Building on Milktruck's point - really the best and easiest way to go about this is to see what shoes feel most comfortable to you.  I would go with that over any "scan."

            Everyone's gotta running blog; I'm the only one with a POOL-RUNNING blog.

             

            And...if you want a running Instagram where all the pictures are of cats, I've got you covered.

            theateist


              But "comfortable" isn't necessary the right ones, right? What if I'll take neutral like "Hoka Clifton 8", but I really need a stability shoe like "Brooks Adrenaline GTS", because I might really have some sort of pronation, and while I'll feel comfortable with the neutral shoe I actually harm myself.

              darkwave


              Mother of Cats

                But "comfortable" isn't necessary the right ones, right? What if I'll take neutral like "Hoka Clifton 8", but I really need a stability shoe like "Brooks Adrenaline GTS", because I might really have some sort of pronation, and while I'll feel comfortable with the neutral shoe I actually harm myself.

                 

                 

                So first of all "pronation" itself is not bad.  All running gaits should have a bit of pronation.  It is OVER pronation that might be a concern.  But if you don't pronate at all in your running gait, you also have a problem.

                 

                Second of all, if you have pronation that requires correction, then running in a shoe without that correction is not going to feel good.  Just as if you wear a shoe that corrects something you don't need to correct, that won't feel good either. 

                 

                Your concern is that the shoe that feels comfortable to you may not be what you need, and I'm telling you that if a shoe feels comfortable to you, it's giving you what you need.

                 

                Here's some reading for you, if you want a medical journal citation:  Running shoes and running injuries: mythbusting and a proposal for two new paradigms: ‘preferred movement path’ and ‘comfort filter’ | British Journal of Sports Medicine (bmj.com)

                Everyone's gotta running blog; I'm the only one with a POOL-RUNNING blog.

                 

                And...if you want a running Instagram where all the pictures are of cats, I've got you covered.

                  This may take some trial and error. Many runners buy shoes that they won't buy again.

                  You may get some injury niggles with the wrong shoes but you won't die.

                  Neutral is by far more favorable and a better place to start from.

                  50+ PBs -  

                  5k 18.21 Hagley Parkrun  July 21      82.27 % age grade

                  10k TT 37.21 may 2nd 2021 strava run 82.51 % age grade

                  Half marathon  1.23.30 may 21 80.11 % age grade

                  " If you don't use it you lose it,  but if you use it, it wears out.

                  Somewhere in between is about right "      

                   

                  zoom-zoom


                  rectumdamnnearkilledem

                    This may take some trial and error. Many runners buy shoes that they won't buy again.

                     

                    Oh, the stories I could tell...

                     

                    Once upon a time a running store had me running in the Kayano. That was >15 years ago. I can't remember the last time I ran in a shoe with any stability. I do need OTC orthotic-esque insoles in my cycling shoes, though, as my knees tend to angle in at one point in my pedal-stroke. It never caused me pain/injury, but reduced the power I could push through with each rotation.

                     

                    That's one thing the OP could try -- a neutral shoe...adding insoles if signs of inadequate stability surface.

                    Getting the wind knocked out of you is the only way to

                    remind your lungs how much they like the taste of air.    

                         ~ Sarah Kay

                      One unicorn of a shoe is the NB FuelCell Prism. It's marketed as a "light stability" shoe, but neutral gait runners don't notice the firmer medial side, and supinators like me who roll along on their lateral side don't even even know it's there. It might be GREAT for someone who has a difference between their R and L feet regarding footplant and gait.

                       

                      https://www.doctorsofrunning.com/2020/10/new-balance-fuel-cell-prism-review.html

                      55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying