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My slow pace and fast Heart Rate (Read 772 times)

    I have been jog/walking for a few months now, but I still can't seem to break out of the jog/walk pace when I am trying to keep under the 70% of heart rate using a monitor. I'm not trying to be the fastest, but it would be nice to be able to say I "ran" a marathon, not "walked" a marathon. I want to run a Marathon in October I'm afraid that running at above a 70% HR would not allow me to finish a Marathon without walking most of it. Any experience, recommendations, pointers?
    Will be weightlifting and running to get into the best shape I can before turning 40. Here are my progress pictures: http://tinyurl.com/584qwt
      I've read that marathon runners are often running at 80-83% of their Max HR during the race. Some, presumably are able to maintain an even higher HR without slowing. I don't think there's anything magical about staying under 70% while racing that distance, and indeed, it sounds quite low to me for a race. What's more important is what your body and your fitness are. If you are well prepared and well conditioned for the distance, then you will be able to run most, if not all, of the race.
      How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.
      Scout7


      CPT Curmudgeon

        Personally, I wouldn't race with a HRM, except for data-gathering purposes. That being said, how did you determine your heart rate to begin with? Additionally, have you tested it recently? You should be running faster at a given heart rate than you were when you started (assuming you're being consistent). Another thing to consider.....Don't worry about the numbers so much right now. You're still relatively new to running. Your HR is going to probably be all over the place. I would work on increasing the number of days a week you run, and the distances / amount of time (whichever you prefer) you run at a time. I would work on cutting out the walking. Don't worry so much about where your HR is all the time. My $.01.
          I don't think there's anything magical about staying under 70% while racing that distance, and indeed, it sounds quite low to me for a race. What's more important is what your body and your fitness are. If you are well prepared and well conditioned for the distance, then you will be able to run most, if not all, of the race.
          Personally, I wouldn't race with a HRM, except for data-gathering purposes. That being said, how did you determine your heart rate to begin with? Additionally, have you tested it recently? You should be running faster at a given heart rate than you were when you started (assuming you're being consistent). Another thing to consider.....Don't worry about the numbers so much right now. You're still relatively new to running. Your HR is going to probably be all over the place. I would work on increasing the number of days a week you run, and the distances / amount of time (whichever you prefer) you run at a time. I would work on cutting out the walking. Don't worry so much about where your HR is all the time. My $.01.
          What they said. Exactly. Worth a lot more than a penny. When I say my prayers at night, one thing I always thank Buddha for is making me fortunate enough NOT to have picked up an HRM two years ago. I'm convinced that for anyone who's run less than (at least) 2-3 years, unless they're using it on a doctor's order and/or with a coach's supervision, an HRM is either worthless or actually counter-productive. As for "running" or "walking" your first marathon, I'd focus on just getting in the training to make it to the finish line. However you do it, even if takes you six hours, it's a significant accomplishment. And for what it's worth, I ran every step of my first marathon ... and truly wish I hadn't. It turned what should have been a memorable experience into one that kept me away from running for almost a decade.
          E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
          -----------------------------

            I have been doing all my training with a HRM since January 1 at 70% HR and my training times have fallen way back. However I am doing this for a reason - I am building up my weekly mileage considerably and I do not want to over-tax my body at this stage. This slow easy pace is supposed (over time) to adapt your muscles to use the oxygen supply more efficiently so that eventually you will be able to run faster for the same effort. We shall see!! What I want to see happen is that the last miles of my training runs are at the same pace (and importantly effort) as the first miles. That will suggest that I am as aerobically fit at that level as I am ever likely to get. If and when that happens I will go onto the next stage of training - which will be interspersing my slow easy runs with some faster runs of 80%+ HR. Of course these % mean nothing if you do not have a reasonable idea of your max HR. One way to guesstimate it is to use the formula 205 minus half your age but that might be off. My max is 189 - using that formula would only give me 177. Once you have your max and resting heart rate you can use the formula (my own figures shown) - Max (189) minus Rest (43) = Range (146) 90% = 146 x .90 + 43 = 174 (all figures rounded) 80% = 146 x .80 + 43 = 160 70% = 146 x .70 + 43 = 145 60% = 146 x .60 + 43 = 130 Of course you could ignore all that and just go by feel!! I have only been running since April 2006 and I intend to run a half marathon this September and a full marathon a year later. Some wise soul once told me that it takes at least 2 years for your body to adapt to being a long distance runner so for me it is going to be "softly softly catchee monkey". One other point. I see you are in Ireland and have probably been experiencing the same high winds recently that I have in England. When these are head winds (which mine always are on the return leg) they are bound to have an impact on your pace/time. One day last week I had to walk to keep at 70% (in fact I had to walk it was impossible to run) and my effort still remained at 61% !!

            2013

            3000 miles

            Sub 19:00 for 5K  05-03-13 Clee Prom 5K - 19:00:66 that was bloody close!

            Sub-40:00 for 10K 17-03-13 Gainsborough 10K - 39:43

            Sub 88:00 for HM

             

              Hey Chris, Winds have definitely slowed me down. To all: I should clarify that I know that running and training paces are different. I wam merely trying to get an idea if my training is meant to take this long to show results; if I'm doing it right. Precisely because I am a beginner I should wear a monitor. Focusing on running long distances only and not worrying about "walking" took me pretty quickly to a plateau and knee pain. I thought I was just supposed to keep increasing my distances and my speed! Mentally I'm 21 ... but my body is reminding me that I am 37. Thanks all for your feedback.
              Will be weightlifting and running to get into the best shape I can before turning 40. Here are my progress pictures: http://tinyurl.com/584qwt
                Man don't I know it!! My body keeps reminding me I am NOT 18 any more!!! Using the straight 220-age for my max I run right at 80%. I discovered that I can vary my pace WITHOUT walking and hover right in that range. When starting your run don't start out too fast, sneak up on the upper end of your range and then when the alarm sounds because you are high just slow your pace a little. Make SMALL adjustments. You'll find that your legs are not as tired and sore. BTW your times will improve as you are not walking anymore or if your HM says that you must slow that much you'll be walking for less time.

                To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire

                Scout7


                CPT Curmudgeon

                  To see any sort of marked improvement takes at LEAST 6 weeks of solid running, about 5-6 days a week. Again, I would want to know how you determined what your LTHR / Max HR is. Running takes the 3 P's: Practice, Patience, and Perseverance.
                    thanks SCOUT. I actually did the running up a hill a few times (increasingly in speed) to find my Max. That and the usual formulas all come very close to each other, so I set my max at 186 and my morning resting heart rate is 55 (or 50 ... it's in my watch at home).
                    Will be weightlifting and running to get into the best shape I can before turning 40. Here are my progress pictures: http://tinyurl.com/584qwt