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Heart Rate Monitor Training Schedules for Beginners (Read 839 times)

    I just bought a Heart Rate Monitor, and realized that I reach 85% of my Max very quickly. This forces me to walk a lot more, which is a little depressing after it taking some effort to build endurance from 10 minutes to 1 hour jog. But this has helped me realize that I need to build up cardiovascular health. Now I'm looking form challenging weekly routines (on flat roads). Normally, routines for beginners only do about 20 minutes a day. But considering that I used to run for 45 min to 1 hour before, this seems like a huge step back. It almost doesn't seem worth going in to the windy/rainy/cold Dublin morning for 20 mins. Whaddaya think? Do you have or know of any programs/schedules for improving fitness using a HRM?
    Will be weightlifting and running to get into the best shape I can before turning 40. Here are my progress pictures: http://tinyurl.com/584qwt
      No need to cut back on your running, just slow down the pace, shorten the stride, to keep within 65-80% of MAX. There is an MAF formula that takes 180 - your age, and stay below that rate for 12 weeks. If your old, like me, that leaves you walking.
      Age is not an illusion
        I did the "MAF" formula with a HRM for the summer and part of fall. My experience with it was that it allowed me to jog extreeeeemely slowly but for a reeeeeeally long time. I don't think you'll need to cut back on your time, just your speed. There's a little bit more to "MAF" than just 180-age. It lowers it even more if you've been sick, haven't been working out a lot, if you have preexisting conditions (like a cardiac history, for example), and so on. I don't have the specifics here, but try seraching "Maffetone" on the net. Like all training programs, YMMV (your-milage-may-vary). That is to say, your MAF number may... or may not... be your ideal training zone. Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be a way to figure this out without trial and error. Sad You can apply heart-rate-training to most programs - you just run everything at the BPM you're supposed to. Takes some self-discipline, that's for sure! We all seem to want to run faster and faster... while this makes you run slower! Make sure you do some regular MAF tests to see if you're actually improving or not. Depending on how long you're running, pick a set distance (1, 3, or 5 miles) on a flat course (or use a treadmill) and, AFTER WARMING UP, run that course at EXACTLY (well... as close as you can!) the heart rate you're supposed to. Record your times and mile splits. Then, go back every month or two and repeat. You should find that you're able to run that same course faster while at the same heart rate. That's how you'll know you're improving. Heart rate training takes discipline and patience. It ain't for sissies! It takes your pride and kicks it squarely in the rear. It takes your ego and laughs at it. And you have to keep coming back for more and more and more. But it *does* help you develop your cardiovascular fitness. And it helps keep you from hurting yourself, since running too fast is a major way that new people often hurt themselves! Good luck! Janell

        Roads were made for journeys...

          Maybe you are underestimating your Max. What protocol did you use to determine it? I've never trained with a HRM but I know that many people underestimate (or overestimate) their max HR which makes all the calculations moot. I know one runner who, in a recent 5K, (don't ask me what he was doing wearing a HRM in a race) actually hit 103% of his Max. How is that possible? Simple, it's not. Also, if you've previously run 45 min to an hour comfortably, you're not a beginner. I agree with wings; you can apply heart rate training to just about any training program. Jack Daniels Phd and others devote a lot of ink in their programs to HRM training.

          Runners run.

            Bah! Heart rate monitors. Roll eyes The whole thing reminds me of beginner golfers who study every advanced technique they can find, buy every gadget on the infomercials, and spend thousands getting their swing computer-analyzed ... ... rather than just hitting the driving range, and then enjoying the game. To repeat: bah!
            E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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              "Bah" yourself, JakeKnight! I found the HRM to be a useful, fun motivational tool/toy. And even though I'm leaving it at home about half the time now, I still like the thing! In short, if playing with the toys/tools of the game is fun, then there's nothing wrong with doing it. I know some people who've gotten Gamens for the same reason. Not because they weren't enjoying running, but because *they like the toys*. The heart rate monitor by itself won't make you a better runner. Running will. But using a heart rate monitor will help you train appropriately if you use it correctly. Some people ::ahem:: run a bit too hard for what their body's ready for ::ahem:: and end up hurting themselves ::ahem:: /pointed look. Tongue

              Roads were made for journeys...

                "Bah" yourself, JakeKnight!
                Double bah! In fact, bah humbug. Take that. Hey, I understand the toy thing. Like I hinted at, I've got every golf toy ever invented. Golf infomercials are targeted at me, personally. I bought one of those stupid clubs that snap in the middle if you swing wrong; I'm the guy that bought not one but two of those wedges with the industrial diamonds on the face, sure I'd magically improve my short game. But if I'd spent that time and money on lessons and fundamentals, I might actually be able to golf. Just my 2.5 cents.
                The heart rate monitor by itself won't make you a better runner. Running will. But using a heart rate monitor will help you train appropriately if you use it correctly. Some people ::ahem:: run a bit too hard for what their body's ready for ::ahem:: and end up hurting themselves ::ahem:: /pointed look. Tongue
                Actually, there's one of my problems with toys right there - they teach you to listen to devices, rather than you body and your common sense. A HRM wouldn't have saved poor Sgt. Hulka; if anything, it would have told me I wasn't running hard enough. Common sense was all that was required - when you're injured, don't run hard on it. Duh. But I'm stickin' with my 2 cents. For most beginners at least, I think they'd be better off if they were given nothing but a pair of shoes, some shorts, a swat on the ass and directions to the nearest sidewalk or trail. Time to go watch the computer analysis of my 3-wood swing now ... Cool
                E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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                Scout7


                CPT Curmudgeon

                  The 220-age thing is extremely inaccurate. The MAF method can be inaccurate as well. The most accurate method is of course to see a doc and have them do the whole test for it, but you can do your own time trial on the track. It's tricky to do, however, and may take you a few times to get it right. For a good resource on using HRMs for training, go here: http://www.d3multisport.com/articles.php There's a bunch of articles related to base training, determing your zones, etc. etc. etc.
                    Scout, Interesting what he has to say about the "No Benifit Zone". Right where I run! I think I can attest to what he says. JakeKnight, Break-A-Way Golf Clubs!!??? Talk about toys, and gadgets. Besides isn't bio-feed-back sort of like bio-mechanics; sort of like getting attuned to my karma; sort of like having that hummm I am suposed to hummmmmmmmmm to myself to get attuned to my subconsious; sort of like getting to know my past life, and or future self? Maybe I can even find out where I am going with this. Smile To heck with it I am just going to strap on my HRM, that is sometking tangable anyway.
                    Age is not an illusion
                    Scout7


                    CPT Curmudgeon

                      I will say I agree with our simian friend on certain points. I have never used a HRM. I learned running and pace doing HS cross-country and track. I personally feel that a HRM won't tell me much that my body doesn't already tell me. That being said, I believe that for someone who is new to running, and is interested in different training methods, a HRM CAN be beneficial. I say can be, because the user needs to couple that with RPE (Rate of Perceived Exertion). Once you learn what a different HR zone feels like, you don't need to have the HRM for every run. I would say that if you're diligent about listening to your body, and really stick with putting in those base miles in Z1/2, you really cut the learning curve on relying on your HRM, and you unlock a greater potential by training at an appropriate pace early on. For anyone who's ever done a long race (and even a short race), the ability to intuitively know your pace, and where you stand physically and mentally is really powerful. But, you don't NEED to use the HRM. It is a tool. Use it if helps you. Just remember to try to match up your HR to how you feel, and your pace.
                        I bought and use a heart rate monitor and have even used it in my one and only race to date. I found that it really helps me keep my pace. Sure I do recovery walks in my training and during the race, but they are fewer and shorter than when I first started. Had I paid closer attention to the HRM during the race I feel that my over all time would have been better. The first mile split was too fast and my HRM was telling me just that long before I got there. So at the end of the race I was walking a lot more than I should have because I had not paced myself correctly from the start. It can be a “toy” if you treat it that way. Or it can be a tool to help you learn to listen and feel what your body is telling you while you are running.

                        To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire