1

Runner's knee help? (Read 116 times)

slayerming2


    Hi I'm a freshmen in college. Two years ago in the summer after my junior year I decided to start running on the treadmill. I started running by going 30 minutes 35 minutes and 40 minutes and taking a day break and than on the fifth day the same except 0.2 miles faster. I did this until I got to 42 minutes, 50 minutes, and 55 minutes at 7 miles per hour. However my big problem was that I was wearing really old walking shoes. I didn't start wearing running shoes until it was too late. At two months of running my knees started hurting pretty bad. They are usually a little painful when i'm not running and it gets worse after running. I had three doctors examine it and they didn''t know what the problem was. I had an MRI and it showed no problems as well. I did physical therapy for 6 months. The first two months helped a bit, but afterwards there wasn't any improvements. Now two years later I want to start again. I just bought a new pair of running shoes today and I'm currently breaking them in. Any suggestions on what I should do?

    zonykel


      When I first started running in 2010, I got runner's knee about 3 months into my training program. I tried a multitude of things, and the pain would go on and off for about 3 months.

       

      what probably helped me was changing my running form. I think I was overstriding and that was the root cause of my problems. Not sure if that's a similar issue to yours.

      slayerming2


        When I first started running in 2010, I got runner's knee about 3 months into my training program. I tried a multitude of things, and the pain would go on and off for about 3 months.

         

        what probably helped me was changing my running form. I think I was overstriding and that was the root cause of my problems. Not sure if that's a similar issue to yours.

         

        So what exactly did you change?

          I agree 100% with zonykel.   I had Runner's Knee for a few years and was very frustrated.  Then I finally learned the 'right' way to run -- and no more knee pain for the last 4 years (with 35 races, including 10 HMs and 4 FMs).

           

          So what exactly did I change?

          Basically, I changed my running form by eliminating over-striding and making sure my foot lands under my body.   Here are two videos which describe this technique quite well:

           

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRkeBVMQSgg

           

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_aqCiziTaw

           

          I also use semi-minimalist shoes -- not necessary, but they work for me. For the last 2 years, I've used Saucony Kinvaras (K3 model now) -- they weigh about  8 ounces and have a 4mm drop from heel to toe.   These shoes help remind me to land more mid-foot and under my body.

          "If you want to become the best runner you can be, start now. Don't spend the rest of your life wondering if you can do it."
          -Priscilla Welch

            I always tell folks to try out the 180 steps per minute trick. Even you don't stay at 180 often the act of focusing on that will shorten your stride and correct some bad behaviors you may have. An easy way to do this is to download some tunes that at 180bpm and then just try to have a foot fall every time you hear that beat.

            zonykel


               

              So what exactly did you change?

              The first thing I changed was my cadence. Although some people throw the 180 steps per minute as an absolute goal, I think getting in the proximity is good enough.

               

              for a long time I thought that landing on the forefoot was mandatory, but even coaches like Greg McMillan or physical therapist Jay Dicharry mention that you could have a slight heel strike. What matters is where your foot lands. If you overstride, your foot will land way ahead of your body. Jay Dicharry recommends that your foot land slightly ahead of your body (there are some authors that suggest that your foot should land directly underneath your body, but that's very hard to do and inefficient).

              slayerming2


                Okay what about the pain. Even when I don't run I feel some pain. If I do run the pain is a lot worse. So will the pain go away if I change my technique?

                  Yes.

                   

                  I agree with the cadence suggestions, and, in my case, my first pairs of running shoes made the pain a lot worse.  "Motion control" shoes are bad news, IMHO.

                  Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                  zonykel


                    Okay what about the pain. Even when I don't run I feel some pain. If I do run the pain is a lot worse. So will the pain go away if I change my technique?

                    IMO, you should seek help from someone who treats running injuries. If you have knee pain even when you're not running, then technique change may not help immediately. Try doing other activities in the meantime that do not aggravate the injury (perhaps a spin class?)

                    slayerming2


                      Yes.

                       

                      I agree with the cadence suggestions, and, in my case, my first pairs of running shoes made the pain a lot worse.  "Motion control" shoes are bad news, IMHO.

                       

                      What shoes would your recommend than?

                      slayerming2


                        IMO, you should seek help from someone who treats running injuries. If you have knee pain even when you're not running, then technique change may not help immediately. Try doing other activities in the meantime that do not aggravate the injury (perhaps a spin class?)

                         

                        Where would I find help from someone who has expert knowledge on treating running injuries? I've already been to a sports doctor and physical therapist.

                           

                          What shoes would your recommend than?

                           

                          It's hard to say, they're so individual.  I personally have become a minimalist, thinking the less shoe the better.  It takes a long time to develop the feet and ankles for this, though.  Just don't get shoes that feel like you're wearing bricks, or that make your feet tilt, turn, or twist as you run.

                          Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                          zonykel


                             

                            Where would I find help from someone who has expert knowledge on treating running injuries? I've already been to a sports doctor and physical therapist.

                             

                            Those would be the kind of people you should see when you seek professional medical help. Sorry to hear it hasn't worked out for you. Not sure what else I can offer, other than perhaps reading a book like Jay Dicharry's, "Anatomy for Runners". It doesn't specifically address things like "runner's knee" (since knee pain is a symptom of the problem, not the root cause), but it does address physical shortcomings via a series of tests and then some recommended actions to correct the deficiencies. His typical saying is "High forces through unstable levers leads is a recipe for disaster".