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Differences Between Races Measured in Meters Versus Kilometers (Read 79 times)

    I'm just curious about why there are different records for distances that should be identical.  For instance, if you go to a runner's stats, you'll sometimes see their 10,000 meter time and a different 10K time.  Theoretically both distances should be identical although I'm surmising the latter is run on a road rather than a track.

     

    Assuming a race is held on an accurately measured course and that traffic is not an issue, why should there be a difference between the two settings?  Is it just because of elevation variation even though the road course begins and ends at the same place as against a track that is perfectly flat?

    Personal Records:

    5K - 20:18 ran in August 2019

    10K - 41:15 ran in September 1990

    Half Marathon - 1:39:06 ran in September 2020


    an amazing likeness

      Aren't the track times always faster due to controlled conditions like limits on wind speed and things like that?  In addition to the course variations that the track doesn't have that road does.

       

      Track is assumed to be ideal conditions and events in different locations can be compared to each other.  Whereas 10K at road course x doesn't compare to 10K at road course y.

      Acceptable at a dance, invaluable in a shipwreck.

      Marky_Mark_17


        10,000m and 5,000m events are track - 5k and 10k are road. I assume the distinction is because the track is flat and therefore the same regardless of where it is run, whereas road races can have a lot of variation (hills, corners, etc) and therefore aren’t always as comparable to each other like milktruck pointed out.

         

        It might seem odd but a 10k and a 10,000m are actually really different races. Imagine running 25 laps of a track versus a road course with a lot of different scenery.

        5,000m: 15:39 (Dec-19) | 10,000m: 32:34 (Mar-20) | 10km: 33:15 (Sep-19) 

        HM: 1:10:46 (Nov-19) | FM: 2:41:41 (Oct-20)

        Last race: Wairarapa Country Marathon, 11 Oct, 2:41:41 (PB)

        Up next: NZ Road Race Champs (10k), 7 Nov (I hope!)

        "CONSISTENCY IS KING"

          World athletics and other governing bodies have always considered road running as a different event from track racing, with separate records. I always figured track races are expressed in meters and road races in kilometers to convey the different levels of precision in measuring each.

           

          They're different enough events that it has never seemed strange to me.

          Runners run.

          wcrunner2


          I'm out of ideas

            It might seem odd but a 10k and a 10,000m are actually really different races. Imagine running 25 laps of a track versus a road course with a lot of different scenery.

             

            +1

            Tactics, field size, awareness of where you are in the race, more frequent splits, crowd size; they all contribute to makiing them different races.

             

            2020 Races:

                 10/24/20 - Piedmont-8

             

            rlopez


              Addendum to all the great info above....

               

              10,000 meters on a track is 10,000 meters plus or minus just a little bit for passing and whatnot. 10k on a road implies measurement, and road race measurement is a bit of a dark art. Ok, not really, I'm being poetic. But there IS a bunch of stuff that's factored in (including an actual fudge factor) which does not come up in track stuff.

               

              You need bhearn in here to talk about what counts for a "record" on track vs road.

               

              Then we can talk trails where the shit is bananas.

              DaBurger


                Aren't the track times always faster due to controlled conditions like limits on wind speed and things like that?  In addition to the course variations that the track doesn't have that road does.

                 

                 

                wait, my track times are supposed to be faster?

                Know thyself.

                 

                  Interesting.  So I'd imagine 10,000 meter track times would be faster given the flat and controlled conditions compared to 10K road times.  Are there then two official records for each distance - one for track and one for road?

                  Personal Records:

                  5K - 20:18 ran in August 2019

                  10K - 41:15 ran in September 1990

                  Half Marathon - 1:39:06 ran in September 2020

                    Yes, and in addition to different records for road and

                    track, there are separate records for indoor track and outdoor track.

                    Runners run.


                    an amazing likeness

                      Interesting.  So I'd imagine 10,000 meter track times would be faster given the flat and controlled conditions compared to 10K road times.  Are there then two official records for each distance - one for track and one for road?

                       

                      After WWI, Sir Richard Mark Craigstuart III, Earl of the Fifth Firth of Avonsdale, found himself stranded in France. During the war, Sir Richard had developed a serious attraction to French wine and bit of drinking problem.

                       

                      Post-war he remained in France to enjoy the wine, cheese and truffles and one day upon being encouraged to exit a roadside cafe due to his badly inebriated state, Sir Richard found himself staggering mid-road when the peleton of the  1932 Tour de France swept by heading up to Alp du Steepaspoop. Wine bottle in hand, Sir Richard was incensed at being passed by these smelly vagabond bike-riding ne'erdowells and preceded to chase down the lead rider, intent on bonking him over the head with the bottle in his hand.

                       

                      Unbeknownst to Sir Richard, he had passed a timing station for the last 10K of the day's Tour stage, and recorded the first road running 10K while in pursuit of Benoit Wafflepedal who was pulling the peleton up Alp for the day's stage. At the finish the gobsmacked timers recorded Sir Richard's finish time of 36:54.

                       

                      Heading into the Goodwill games of 1952,  it was widely expected that 10,000 meter race times would be pushed into the low 35s, perhaps even 34:58. Everyone had been watching Bannister's times, and knew that the post WWII elite University athletes we benefiting from training on beaches to slow-motion music and were clawing down record times across the board.

                       

                      In a desperate attempt to preserve Sir Richard's legacy, his nephew, the Third Earl of Wilshire in Essex, sued the IOC, the IATF, the League of Nations and Aston Martin claiming that track records could never be compared to road records.

                       

                      This legacy lives on to present times.


                      Probably have a few details wrong, but that’s generally how these things happen.

                      Acceptable at a dance, invaluable in a shipwreck.

                        I would add that the energy return from track surface is an advantage over a road. The world road versus track records for 5000m 5k and 10 000m and 10k are all faster for the track versions although with shoes like Vaporflys the gap is closing.

                        50+ PBs -  

                        5k 18.25 Tauranga Parkrun  Sept 20      81.36 % age grade

                        10k 38.55 oct 19 strava run

                        Next race Tauranga city to Surf 11km Nov 1st 2020

                        Mount Maunganui half 10k 28th nov 2020

                        " If you don't use it you lose it but if you use it, it wears out.

                        Somewhere in between is about right "      

                         

                           

                          After WWI, Sir Richard Mark Craigstuart III, Earl of the Fifth Firth of Avonsdale, found himself stranded in France. During the war, Sir Richard had developed a serious attraction to French wine and bit of drinking problem.

                           

                          Post-war he remained in France to enjoy the wine, cheese and truffles and one day upon being encouraged to exit a roadside cafe due to his badly inebriated state, Sir Richard found himself staggering mid-road when the peleton of the  1932 Tour de France swept by heading up to Alp du Steepaspoop. Wine bottle in hand, Sir Richard was incensed at being passed by these smelly vagabond bike-riding ne'erdowells and preceded to chase down the lead rider, intent on bonking him over the head with the bottle in his hand.

                           

                          Unbeknownst to Sir Richard, he had passed a timing station for the last 10K of the day's Tour stage, and recorded the first road running 10K while in pursuit of Benoit Wafflepedal who was pulling the peleton up Alp for the day's stage. At the finish the gobsmacked timers recorded Sir Richard's finish time of 36:54.

                           

                          Heading into the Goodwill games of 1952,  it was widely expected that 10,000 meter race times would be pushed into the low 35s, perhaps even 34:58. Everyone had been watching Bannister's times, and knew that the post WWII elite University athletes we benefiting from training on beaches to slow-motion music and were clawing down record times across the board.

                           

                          In a desperate attempt to preserve Sir Richard's legacy, his nephew, the Third Earl of Wilshire in Essex, sued the IOC, the IATF, the League of Nations and Aston Martin claiming that track records could never be compared to road records.

                           

                          This legacy lives on to present times.


                          Probably have a few details wrong, but that’s generally how these things happen.

                           

                          I read this on the internet, and I, for one, believe every word.

                          I wrote these words and you're reading them.