1

Haglund's Syndrome or Pump Bump (Read 116 times)

    Does anyone have have experience running (or trying to run) with Haglund's Syndrome or Pump Bump.    I've been diagnoses with this and and trying to weigh my options and decide what I can do about it.       Like to hear what other might have experienced and what/how you kept running?

    Champions are made when no one is watching

      Me.    Haglund's doesn't preclude running.  It is the tendonitis/osis associated with it or swelling from bursitis that can cause problems.  That can be a game changer.  Prevention is key.   Try to avoid getting tendonitis as much as possible by strengthening your lower legs, calves, feet.  Make sure you warm up before running.  Foam roll your calves to keep them from tightening up too much and putting undue stress on the tendons.

       

      You can deal with the bump by wearing shoes with soft backs (or cutting out the back of the heel) so the area isn't irritated more.   If the area is actively swelling, rest the heel as much as possible.  You can soak with epsom salts, use contrast baths or apply salonpas patches to help deal with the pain.

      "When those went, these went; and when those stood, these stood; and when those were lifted up from the earth, the wheels were lifted up against them; for the spirit of the living creature was in the wheels."  Ezekiel 1:21

        THKS.   Since it was debilitating for me for a while, I've taken some time off to let everything quit hurting.     I'm now spending a lot of time on the elliptical and been lifting and focusing every few days on the legs to strengthen the muscles of the legs, calf and feet.

         

        Not been rolling -  I get the roller out again tonight......

         

        I have been taping over the 'bump' to keep it from rubbing directly on the back of the shoes (not sure if that's really helping or not).

        Champions are made when no one is watching

          Yes. I've had a few EPAT treatments, also a Tenex procedure, which is a minor surgery. The only real fix, I believe, is full cut-scrape-reattach surgery. But for treatment of symptoms, see if you can find someone who does EPAT. That helps most people quite a bit.

           

          I can run 100+ mpw with this, but those miles have to be slow. So I run long, slow races. If I wanted to run another say marathon PR, I'm not sure what I would do. Getting back to 100% after that kind of surgery is likely to take the better part of a year.

            THKS.   Since it was debilitating for me for a while, I've taken some time off to let everything quit hurting. 

             

            I find that doesn't help for me. What matters most, I think, is *change* in mileage/intensity. Two weeks off, easy 5 mile run, boom, there it is again. Several weeks in a row of high mileage, it's not too bad.

               

              I find that doesn't help for me. What matters most, I think, is *change* in mileage/intensity. Two weeks off, easy 5 mile run, boom, there it is again. Several weeks in a row of high mileage, it's not too bad.

               

              The only reason Im doing this is because I have   had a lot of tendon damage and I needed to get the tendons to stop hurting.

              Champions are made when no one is watching

                 

                The only reason Im doing this is because I have   had a lot of tendon damage and I needed to get the tendons to stop hurting.

                 

                With lots of tendon damage already, it is an uphill battle. 

                 

                I tried acupuncture to get rid of the pain (temporarily) and it *did* provide some relief.  For a while mine would go through cycles of swelling due to bursitis.  I found the salonpas medicated apsirin patches would help relieve the pain.  If you are already in the chronic stage, I agree with bhearn that complete time off may not be the answer.  Lowered intensity running/jogging or even cycling might help as it directs blood flow to the area to increase healing.

                 

                BTW I did all of the PT (calf raises until I was ready to puke and stuff).  My therapist finally gave up on it and told me to see an orthopedic surgeon.  The surgeon did not recommend surgery right off the bat and said that sometimes "it will just go away on its own."  Yeah.  Real scientific.  Still, I have talked to other people who don't think the surgery helped them...That Tenex procedure might be the way to go...

                 

                At any rate, here I am, a couple of years later into this process and the injury *does* seem to be much better with time, allowing me to run 40MPW and even hilly trail runs!  I am counting my blessings and moving cautiously forward towards increased training.

                "When those went, these went; and when those stood, these stood; and when those were lifted up from the earth, the wheels were lifted up against them; for the spirit of the living creature was in the wheels."  Ezekiel 1:21

                  That Tenex procedure might be the way to go...

                   

                  I think it helped me. I still have issues, but now more on the left; I had Tenex on the right. But it is still surgery. Six weeks off running, but it was more like six months before I was back to 100%. (Plus I got a DVT along the way to boot.)

                     With lots of tendon damage already, it is an uphill battle.    

                     

                    I probably should have said tendon pain from a few fast runs...not sure if I really have any damage.   i do have a Dr Appt on Tue to discuss so Ill ask about your suggestions.

                     

                    In the mean time Im logging some serious mileage on the elliptical and hitting the weights....working the calf machine to build strength there...and it seem to be helping.    Fortunately its only on my RIGHT side not both..

                     

                    40 MPW is my goal...always felt best at that number...

                    Champions are made when no one is watching

                    cranston216


                      I have been dealing with this on and off for the past few years.  I have a great sports podiatrist and a combination of using a shoe insert that gives me a bit more cushion and arch support (I am a neutral runner with high arches) and wearing running shoes that do not have a ton of cushion in the heel cup helps.  Adida's makes some of their shoes with a soft, stretchy heel cup and that has been a game changer this year.  I ran a solid spring marathon which I haven't been able to do in quite a while.  I run in the Supernova - I showed the shoes to my doc and she is recommending them to other patients with the same issue. Oh, and I have been wearing more supportive daily shoes, which is a bummer as I love my cute shoes....

                        Thanks for your suggestions (lots of good stuff here).    I have an appointment with a 'foot dr' this afternoon and this post gives me a few thing to ask about.  

                        Champions are made when no one is watching

                        stubbs12


                          I had the "scrape/re-attach" procedure in 2004 and in 2008 for my other foot. This option was the best option as the top of my heels were square and not rounded as they should be. No amount of stretching or PT would have helped. My doctor was concerned the calcification could grow onto the tendon and cause bigger issues. The surgery is outpatient & very minor (30-45 minutes max). My only bad part of recovery occurred when the nerve-block was wearing off. 

                          Recovery is pretty straight-forward. I was in a walking boot for 3 weeks (but just because you CAN walk doesn't mean you should go crazy). Recovery post-boot is at your own pace. A back-less shoe is recommended (the nerves are quite sensitive for a few weeks). Heat, stretching, and lots of walks will help loosen and stretch the tendon. I experienced a lot of tightness in my tendon upon waking for a few months post-surgery on my right foot. I experienced sharp pain on the sides of my heel for a few months post-surgery on my left.  Both are normal, but something to keep in mind during recovery. 

                          I wasn't a runner when I had both done so I wasn't asking "when can I run again?" but I would imagine you'll be feeling back to your running self in a few months (if surgery is the way you go). 

                          I know runners never want to think about surgery, but in this case, I'm glad I did. No problems with my heels since.