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Dicyclomine (Read 104 times)

DukeDB



    Anyone have experience running / racing while taking dicyclomine (bentyl)? Saw a GI doc in advance of a colon cancer screening & in the questioning related my experiences with frequent / urgent bms before / after and sometimes during AM runs. I consider the problem to be an inconvenience as I always manage to hold it together, so to speak, while running and have managed many marathons through careful prep. He suggested this med to address frequency/urgency. The stated side effects don't look very agreeable with summer marathon training, but I couldn't find any runners' experiences on the internet. Would like to hear about real world experience by runners so I can make a decision on it with the doc.

    zoom-zoom


    rectumdamnnearkilledem

      I assume you've already tried Imodium...? Bentyl has always struck me as a sort of last-resort solution when OTC efforts have failed. So you're dealing with some chronic GI disorder? Have you checked-out any disorder-specific groups to see if anyone else might have found a solution to a similar scenario?

       

      Something people in the colorectal cancer world often find helpful is consistent use of Metamucil, but adjusting the amount of water/liquid mixed with it to help with evacuation issues at either end of the spectrum (more liquid to help loosen/speed things, less liquid to allow excess fluid in the large intestine to be absorbed...slowing things down).

       

      It's definitely tricky finding solutions as a younger, more active person. GI docs largely are treating older, more sedentary people. I've had to do a lot of my own trial-of-1 sort of stuff, but have also learned a lot through bouncing things off of others in condition-specific message boards. Though it does help that my colorectal surgeon is a triathlete, so he at least understands that arena.

      Getting the wind knocked out of you is the only way to

      remind your lungs how much they like the taste of air.    

           ~ Sarah Kay

      darkwave


      Mother of Cats

        It doesn't answer your question, but "The Athlete's Gut" is a good general reference book for any runner with gastro-intestinal troubles (or even disease).

         

        "GI docs largely are treating older, more sedentary people. "

         

        Yup.  I have a mild form of ulcerative colitis, and I've had one GI doctor suggest I do "tap water enemas" before races. Another suggested that I fast for 24 hours before a marathon to avoid any explosive GI issues during....

         

        As athletes, sometimes we have to figure it out ourselves.

        Everyone's gotta running blog; I'm the only one with a POOL-RUNNING blog.

         

        And...if you want a running Instagram where all the pictures are of cats, I've got you covered.

        zoom-zoom


        rectumdamnnearkilledem

          I have a mild form of ulcerative colitis, and I've had one GI doctor suggest I do "tap water enemas" before races. Another suggested that I fast for 24 hours before a marathon to avoid any explosive GI issues during....

           

          As athletes, sometimes we have to figure it out ourselves.

           

          Fasting is clearly a no-go, but don't discount the warm water enemas (they'll generally clear things out for ~24 hours). It's how a really large # of advanced stage rectal cancer survivors (particularly those who have had radiation and are left with long-term low anterior resection syndrome) are able travel, work outside the home, exercise, etc. Some surgeons don't want to recommend going to those measures (and some -- shockingly -- don't believe LARS even exists. Very much an abusive and ignorant stance, IMO), but others will openly recommend it to patients, especially as the syndrome is affecting increasingly younger and fitter patients at a really disturbing rate.

          Getting the wind knocked out of you is the only way to

          remind your lungs how much they like the taste of air.    

               ~ Sarah Kay

          darkwave


          Mother of Cats

             

            Fasting is clearly a no-go, but don't discount the warm water enemas (they'll generally clear things out for ~24 hours). It's how a really large # of advanced stage rectal cancer survivors (particularly those who have had radiation and are left with long-term low anterior resection syndrome) are able travel, work outside the home, exercise, etc. 

             

            My concern is with the potential for electrolyte loss from the enema - not a good thing if one is intending to race a marathon all out.

            Everyone's gotta running blog; I'm the only one with a POOL-RUNNING blog.

             

            And...if you want a running Instagram where all the pictures are of cats, I've got you covered.

            zoom-zoom


            rectumdamnnearkilledem

               

              My concern is with the potential for electrolyte loss from the enema - not a good thing if one is intending to race a marathon all out.

               

              I don't know that a single warm water one would be problematic. The ones that are bad news are the Fleet enemas...but those don't provide more than a few hours of "safety," anyhow.

              Getting the wind knocked out of you is the only way to

              remind your lungs how much they like the taste of air.    

                   ~ Sarah Kay

              DukeDB


                Thanks for the replies. All this arose from my responses to the pre-colonoscopy questions about how often / how urgently I needed to go, and I'm getting the colonoscopy because I'm coming up on 50. The doc just went straight to "you need to take bentyl." I hadn't tried even Imodium, and I just considered myself on the high end of the normal distribution of frequency/urgency for a distance runner (judging unscientifically from porta potty usage in my training program).  I think I need to do some reading on my own before getting on that sort of treatment for what's been a manageable problem.

                zoom-zoom


                rectumdamnnearkilledem

                  Thanks for the replies. All this arose from my responses to the pre-colonoscopy questions about how often / how urgently I needed to go, and I'm getting the colonoscopy because I'm coming up on 50. The doc just went straight to "you need to take bentyl." I hadn't tried even Imodium, and I just considered myself on the high end of the normal distribution of frequency/urgency for a distance runner (judging unscientifically from porta potty usage in my training program).  I think I need to do some reading on my own before getting on that sort of treatment for what's been a manageable problem.

                   

                  FYI the standard for first colonoscopy in a patient without family history and/or symptoms is now 45 (for anyone following this thread that is waiting until 50). I expect it will be dropped to 40 in the next decade or so, given how fast increasingly younger onset of polyps/cancer are occurring.

                   

                  Kudos to you for getting on this. My dad never had a colonoscopy and was dead before 70. He also never shared family history (he lost a grandma to CRC), which led to my own diagnosis (stage 4), then my sister (stage 1). We received bad information re: when to start our scopes. We were told that since our dad likely didn't have cancer until he was 60ish that we didn't need to start early. Had I had a scope when our dad died, I would have been found to have stage 2 cancer, likely. It doesn't generally present any symptoms until stage 3 or 4. Our brother has had pre-cancerous polyps. My son and my niece and nephew must all start scopes by 30.

                   

                  It's kind of surprising to me that they're jumping right to Bentyl. That's not even first line treatment for people who have documented colorectal issues.

                  Getting the wind knocked out of you is the only way to

                  remind your lungs how much they like the taste of air.    

                       ~ Sarah Kay

                  DukeDB


                    Well, kudos to you Zoom Zoom for fighting the disease and sharing info about it. I'm in that cohort that turned 45 when it was 50 and but didn't reach 50 before it went to 45. I think a lot of these age limits are not keeping pace with trends or technology so I try to get my work in on schedule. Sounds like a lousy disease...

                    zoom-zoom


                    rectumdamnnearkilledem

                      I assume you, too, graduated HS in '91? Big grin

                       

                      Well, kudos to you Zoom Zoom for fighting the disease and sharing info about it. I'm in that cohort that turned 45 when it was 50 and but didn't reach 50 before it went to 45. I think a lot of these age limits are not keeping pace with trends or technology so I try to get my work in on schedule. Sounds like a lousy disease...

                       

                      Yeah, definitely not a good time. 5/5, do not recommend. It would be less lousy (and less deadly) if it carried no more stigma than any other cancer. I still see people make weird faces and avoid eye contact when I mention my diagnosis. It takes all my will to not tell them to grow up.

                       

                      My dad was generally good about medical screenings, but was totally stupid about the one that ultimately killed him. I often wonder how he'd feel, were he still around to see 2/3 of his kids diagnosed, due to his carelessness. So, yeah, I pretty much won't STFU about it, because I don't want to live to see anyone else diagnosed with what is a largely avoidable, literally shitty disease.

                      Getting the wind knocked out of you is the only way to

                      remind your lungs how much they like the taste of air.    

                           ~ Sarah Kay

                      DavidSimmons


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                        keeponrunning


                          I don't have nearly the experience Zoom-Zoom does on this, but it does seem a bit extreme given you haven't tried anything else yet. I have IBS and manage it with Metamucil and Imodium. I really need to get on actually tracking my food intake though to see any triggers I don't know about.

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                          shu_runner


                            My first GI doctor prescribed Bentyl right out of the gate as well.  He didn't seem too interested in finding the cause and more just treating the symptom.  I filled it but ultimately decided against taking it.

                             

                            Like others suggested, I'd try imodium and metamucil first.  That's how I manage my IBS-D.  It's not perfect and I still have bad days, but it generally allows me to leave the house like a person with a normal functioning GI system.