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12 Year Layoff, What should I expect? (Read 253 times)


No more marathons

    I am similar to cecil in that my first running "career" was relatively late - age 28 to 35.

    And like cecil, I took a bit of a break but mine was 23 years.  And while, at age 64 I still have some hopes of setting new PhatOldMan PR's, there is no way I will race at the pace of my younger self.  I would be happy to run one mile at my then 15K pace.

     

    What to expect?  Stick with it and you should expect steady improvements over the next 7 years or more.  I've read that it takes that long to reach close to your potential.  And at only 40 years old your improvements should stay way ahead of the slowdown brought by father time.

    Boston 2014 - a 33 year journey

    Lordy,  I hope there are tapes. 

    He's a leaker!

      I started at 42. Never really ran before. Guess that is at least as bad as a 12 year layoff. I've been improving every year. I keep changing my goals at the speed of my improvement. Am I fast? I'm middle of the pack. The thing is I just turned 46 and my dream times of three years ago are reality now. So I'm setting new dream objectives for myself and see if maybe I can reach them in another three years: at 49.

      At 40 years old, you have great running years ahead of you.

      Pain is temporary. But your finishing time posted on the internet is FOREVER!


      SlowSteps

        Cyberic thanks for sharing. You have what I consider some very good PR's.

        Goals: 5K Sub 21:00

         

        Running helps keep me sane & gives me a lot of time to think. 

         

        "Therefore we also, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which so easily ensnares us, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us." Hebrews 12:1 (NKJV)

        RunSplendidly


          As mentioned by others, if you stick with it, you will likely keep improving over the next years. I read an article that referenced a study finding that 7 years after starting to run, most adult runners reach their peak in speed independent of age.

          I have only been running for 2 years now and I know I'm far away from mine while consistently gaining speed.

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