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Speeding Heart Rate (Read 745 times)

    Okay, I'm getting quite frusterated. I read the percentages of what my heart rate is supposed to be for someone my age (18), but I find that all of my runs would be considered too high to be aerobic. I am quite slow, so I don't see how I could go any slower. I have been running for a couple of years, so I don't see how I am in bad shape. I am worried that all of my training is just being wasted because I'm pushing hard all of the time. I used the 220-8 time .5 from runner's world formula. My easy runs I usually get about 180 hr, and on hard days i'll hit over 200! What should I do?
    Kate ;) "The pain of regret is greater than the pain of self discipline."
    Mile Collector


    Abs of Flabs

      You should stop measuring your HR Clowning around Seriously, you could be one of 'em folks with a higher max heart rate than the rest of us. A better rule of thumb is to gauge how hard it is for you to talk while running. If you can carry on a conversation, then you're running easy. If you have to catch your breath every few words, then you're probably at a tempo pace. As always, you should consult your doctor before pushing yourself over 200 on a regular basis.
      Scout7


      CPT Curmudgeon

        220-age has been scientifically proven to be nothing more than bunk. If you want to train by HR, you need to go and establish what your LTHR (Lactate Threshold Heart Rate) is. Max HR is a misnomer, since while it theoretically exists, there is no way you would be able to get your heart rate to that point through exercise. The best method I have seen to determine your LTHR is a field test. Go to a track, or a relatively flat section of road. Warm up some to get your heart rate going a little, and then start the test, which is 30 minutes of running. After the first 10 minutes, you should hit the lap button on you HRM. Then proceed to run for the next 20 minutes at a pace that is steady, but is going to give pretty much everything you have. You should finish the 30 min. knowing that you gave it all, and couldn't really run much more. For a good description go here: http://www.d3multisport.com/articles/determinezones.html If you go to the home page (link on that page), there's another link to an Excel file that you can download to calculate zones and pacing and such.
          220-age has been scientifically proven to be nothing more than bunk.
          Scout - you said you wanted us to let you know when you were sounding testy... While it may be technically true... still... Wink Tongue

          Roads were made for journeys...

            Thanks, that helps a lot! I will try to just use the good ol' talk test, but I would still like to do the 30 minute LTHR workout out of curiosity and a guideline. Smile
            Kate ;) "The pain of regret is greater than the pain of self discipline."
              Allow me to quote from my designated running guru, Pete Pfitzinger: You can accurately determine your max HR during a hard interval session. An appropriate workout is to warm up thoroughly and then run 3 high intensity repeats of 2 to 3 minutes up a moderate hill, and jog back down right away after each one. If you run the first hill at 90% effort, and then run the last 2 all out, your heart rate should reach its maximal level during the 2nd or 3rd repeat. Interestingly, there is evidence that max HR changes with an individual’s aerobic fitness. Your max HR decreases when you make large gains in your cardiovascular fitness, and increases again if you have the misfortune to go from being very fit to out of shape. An untrained person may experience a 7% decrease in max HR with training. As your max HR changes, your heart rate training zones may need fine-tuning. If you have substantially increased your level of training you should test your max HR every 6 to 12 weeks to check whether it has decreased. Similarly, if you have had a prolonged break from running, you should check your max HR because it may have increased during your time off.
              How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.
              vicentefrijole


                Allow me to quote from my designated running guru, Pete Pfitzinger: You can accurately determine your max HR during a hard interval session.
                That's what I did... (actually, I ran a 4 x 800m with 30 seconds between and pushed the last 2 as hard as I could... I skipped the hill, though.. I'm not that hardcore). It works pretty well (I've never seen my heart rate go higher) but, of course, is mildly unpleasant. Wink
                  Ach, I can take it... Confused
                  Kate ;) "The pain of regret is greater than the pain of self discipline."
                  Scout7


                  CPT Curmudgeon

                    Scout - you said you wanted us to let you know when you were sounding testy... While it may be technically true... still... Wink Tongue
                    Sorry, wingz, I'll try harder next time. The method that you use (whether it's the one I outlined, or the one outlined by Pfitzinger or Hadd), should work either way, but will definitely give you a much better determinant than using the 220-age or Karvonen formula do. I do know that if you were to go to a sports med place, they do a treadmill test, and it runs for 30-60 minutes. As an alternative, you could also run a 10k race to do it, too.
                      It's stuff exactly like this that makes me avoid heart rate monitors like they're laced with bubonic plague. Obviously, in the hands of a trained coach working with an elite athlete, who has undergone all the right medical testing ... they're a necessity. For beginners, I think they too often become a device that overrides common sense.
                      You should stop measuring your HR Clowning around .
                      What he said. I think monitoring your own effort and breathing will probably be better, at this point. But if you insist on using the gadget, especially at your age and with your heartrate, seriously go get tested by a sports doc. If nothing else, he can give you a max heartrate that is actually accurate.
                      E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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