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Wife needs shoe help (Read 92 times)

Okpatsfan


    my wife started running a year or so ago. She now averages 8-10 miles every other day. I just saw her feet the other day, and I get running takes a toll, but she has this blistered peeling skin at the tips of all her toes by the nails. Looks red and painful. I then asked her maybe her shoes don't fit right and she showed me them and they are the Target brand Champion $29 special. I don't know much about running and the right shoes but I told her in some things you actually get what you pay for and running shoes is one of them. She says that they will all wear out just as fast and doesn't want to waste the $. I looked at these shoes and don't see much arch support to begin with. They are extremely light, I'll give them that but correct me if I'm wrong - if she's running that much (maybe 40-50 miles a week) she needs to invest in better shoes. I'm thinking a Mothers Day gift card to a runners store ( where she really can't spend it on something else) is in order.


    Cattywumpus

      That is a great idea, but tell her we suggest she gets a pair that is half size larger than her regular shoes,   She sounds like she needs more room for her toes.

       

      Running is stupid

      Tiger Rag


        Whilst I'm not one for wanting to spend £100s on shoes, she does need to invest in a decent pair. You do get what you pay and you've only got one pair of feet. Not something I'd skimp on.

        JennyJJ


          Your instincts are dead on.  Please take your wife to a reputable running store (not a box store like Dick's or Sports Authority) so that she can get fitted properly.  The employees are training to look at people's running gait, arch, etc., and recommend the appropriate shoe (and possibly an insert) for each runner.  While buying cheap shoes may seem cost effective, it can also lead to serious injuries.  Spend money on your feet - it will pay dividends later.

             she has this blistered peeling skin at the tips of all her toes by the nails. 

             

            At one time, I had calluses on the tips of my toes underneath my toenails.  Then I noticed that my feet were hitting the front of the shoe while running, and only while running.  Longer shoes cured the problem.

             

            Some people can do very well with low cost shoes.  But they need to be the right size.  I would try a larger pair of the same shoes before spending the money on expensive running shoes.

              If she looks around on Amazon, I bet she could find a decent deal for a pair of running shoes.  What size does she wear?  As PP suggested, definitely go up at least half a size from her street shoe.  I go half a size to a full size up depending on the brand.  If she's lightweight, she can get 500 to 600 miles out of a pair of shoes, which at 40 miles a week, is only a $300 - 400 per year at $100 for a pair of shoes, definitely not crazy.  If she stalks internet sales, she can probably do even better.

              Tiger Rag


                I must in the minority whose running shoes are the same size as their normal every day shoes? Although, I found with one particular model, (Brookes Adrenaline 14) the 4 was too tight and the 4.5 was too big. But the size 4 Brookes Ghost 8 is fine.

                  When running that many miles, and the shoes feel light, it doesn't sound like she's getting enough support. I agree with JennyJJ - take her where trained employees can help with the best shoe for her. Once she knows what to look for she can look for a cheaper place to buy them when she needs another pair. You learn a lot when you buy shoes from a good running store.

                    When running that many miles, and the shoes feel light, it doesn't sound like she's getting enough support. I agree with JennyJJ - take her where trained employees can help with the best shoe for her. Once she knows what to look for she can look for a cheaper place to buy them when she needs another pair. You learn a lot when you buy shoes from a good running store.

                     

                    One has to wonder, "trained" to do what? How much training? And more importantly, is there any evidence to backup what they're peddling?  The best advice, is if you aren't injured and haven't been injured, there's absolutely no reason to change. There is no evidence that type of shoes leads to fewer injuries. In fact, there was study done comparing injury rates to shoe cost and the results were inversely proportional to the cost of the shoe. Children who go without shoes longer have fewer foot problems as adults (a different study).  An army study between boots and running shoes showed that those in boots had fewer injuries.

                     

                    Placebo effect is real, so if you believe your shoes make a difference, they probably will. But, we are all just anecdotes. Injury rates appear to be consistent across shoe types. Bottom line, if you've found a shoe that keeps you injury free stick with it.  If you're injured a lot, maybe think about changing shoes.  If you change shoes, be cautious.

                     

                    I


                    Ray

                     

                    bap


                       

                      One has to wonder, "trained" to do what? How much training? And more importantly, is there any evidence to backup what they're peddling?  The best advice, is if you aren't injured and haven't been injured, there's absolutely no reason to change. There is no evidence that type of shoes leads to fewer injuries. In fact, there was study done comparing injury rates to shoe cost and the results were inversely proportional to the cost of the shoe. Children who go without shoes longer have fewer foot problems as adults (a different study).  An army study between boots and running shoes showed that those in boots had fewer injuries.

                       

                      Placebo effect is real, so if you believe your shoes make a difference, they probably will. But, we are all just anecdotes. Injury rates appear to be consistent across shoe types. Bottom line, if you've found a shoe that keeps you injury free stick with it.  If you're injured a lot, maybe think about changing shoes.  If you change shoes, be cautious.

                       

                      I

                       

                      I always take my coaching clients to a running store for their first pair of shoes, or if they are currently or have had foot injuries. But at the end of the day, most runners can get away with anything that's comfortable, is not too small and has a fairly snug heel fit.

                      For a beginner I'd recommend something a little more cushioned but for more experienced runners I don't think it makes much difference, unless you've had specific issues. I beat my feet up badly so I'm now wearing Hokas which have a 4 mm heel to toe drop but a hell of a lot of cushioning, making the pain just about bearable.

                      Certified Running Coach
                      Crocked since 2013

                      bap


                        my wife started running a year or so ago. She now averages 8-10 miles every other day. I just saw her feet the other day, and I get running takes a toll, but she has this blistered peeling skin at the tips of all her toes by the nails. Looks red and painful. I then asked her maybe her shoes don't fit right and she showed me them and they are the Target brand Champion $29 special. I don't know much about running and the right shoes but I told her in some things you actually get what you pay for and running shoes is one of them. She says that they will all wear out just as fast and doesn't want to waste the $. I looked at these shoes and don't see much arch support to begin with. They are extremely light, I'll give them that but correct me if I'm wrong - if she's running that much (maybe 40-50 miles a week) she needs to invest in better shoes. I'm thinking a Mothers Day gift card to a runners store ( where she really can't spend it on something else) is in order.

                         

                        blistered peeling skin at the tips of all her toes by the nails, or an extra $30 on a pair of shoes built for the job?

                         

                        I would recommend she goes to a running store the first time just to make sure she's buying the right size. Look around for the best deal. My local running store (Jack Rabbit - NYC) has a half-price sale at the moment with Saucony Guide 9s and Nike Zooms selling for $59.97.

                        After the first purchase you can buy online or wait for the next sale.

                        Certified Running Coach
                        Crocked since 2013