Core Exercises (Read 1404 times)

ud32


    Looking for a ab/core routine to start off the new year with. I found this post on RA - anyone else have a good routine or link to a routine they want to share ?

     

    http://www.runningahead.com/forums/post/cf090650ba524ba98b03095d6f8fcc46#focus

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      Here's a good one that my friend and I do.  you can also include some planks to strengthen your back.

       

      (sorry about the quality):  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32BiR7XaJWI


      I'm back!

        I do the core exercises from Pfitzinger's Advanced Marathoning 3x/week.

         

        http://books.google.com/books?id=V7Hcxuxc644C&pg=PA90

        zonykel


          http://youtu.be/yXpK3bF9UlA

           

          not strictly core, but the link above is the first of a 5-part series for an 8 week general strength progression for runners. Many of the exercises (planks, donkey kicks, etc.) are covered in many books and magazines. This one is from running times.

            Good stuff.  Jay knows what he's talking about.  I recommend you watch all 5 of them, plus search any of his stuff (sprint drills, etc.).

            http://youtu.be/yXpK3bF9UlA

             

            not strictly core, but the link above is the first of a 5-part series for an 8 week general strength progression for runners. Many of the exercises (planks, donkey kicks, etc.) are covered in many books and magazines. This one is from running times.

              A good routine? I reckon squats, deadlifts, overhead presses, bench presses, push-ups, pull-ups, dips, crunches. Probably in that order of priority - don't do them all every time. Low reps, high weight ("high" meaning high for however strong you are, not with reference to what other people lift).

                A good routine? I reckon squats, deadlifts, overhead presses, bench presses, push-ups, pull-ups, dips, crunches. Probably in that order of priority - don't do them all every time. Low reps, high weight ("high" meaning high for however strong you are, not with reference to what other people lift).

                Real glad you brought up "Deadlifts"--one of the best ways to strengthen your back.  However, all due respect, think about it:

                 

                * Squats--quads (front part of your thighs): you should have leg curl to balance with your hamstrings

                * Overhead presses--triceps

                * Bench presses--triceps

                * Push-ups--triceps

                * Pull-ups--BICEPS

                * Dips--triceps

                * Crunches (if I'm thinking correctly...)--abs

                 

                You seem to be strengthening the back of your arms (triceps) more than anything else.  This is what I meant by "balance": your program doesn't seem to have enough balance.  Imbalance in strength training routine actually work AGAINST your over-all development program.  Muscle imbalance is one of the leading cause of injuries.  If you don't know what you're doing, it's better off not do it at all.

                 

                Also, my (additional) 2 cents; now we're getting away from "core exercises" and getting into general strengthening exercises.  In my opinion, particularly for distance runners, it would be better if you use "dynamic" exercises than more static ones.  For example, it would be better to perform a whole set of "clean-and-jerk" than presses here and pulls there...  In fact, I saw a YouTube clip of Lolo Jones doing a gym work and she was using a light weight and using the weights almost like a swinging tool to strengthen OVER-ALL general body exercise (including legs too), pulling action and pushing action and all that as well.  I thought it was very intriguing.  Personally, for distance running, I prefer hill training and drills over weight training.  But, if in the gym, I would prefer this type of exercises over static weight training routine.  But that's just me.

                  Real glad you brought up "Deadlifts"--one of the best ways to strengthen your back.  However, all due respect, think about it:

                   

                  * Squats--quads (front part of your thighs): you should have leg curl to balance with your hamstrings

                  * Overhead presses--triceps

                  * Bench presses--triceps

                  * Push-ups--triceps

                  * Pull-ups--BICEPS

                  * Dips--triceps

                  * Crunches (if I'm thinking correctly...)--abs

                   

                  You seem to be strengthening the back of your arms (triceps) more than anything else.  This is what I meant by "balance": your program doesn't seem to have enough balance.  Imbalance in strength training routine actually work AGAINST your over-all development program.  Muscle imbalance is one of the leading cause of injuries.  If you don't know what you're doing, it's better off not do it at all.

                   

                  Also, my (additional) 2 cents; now we're getting away from "core exercises" and getting into general strengthening exercises.  In my opinion, particularly for distance runners, it would be better if you use "dynamic" exercises than more static ones.  For example, it would be better to perform a whole set of "clean-and-jerk" than presses here and pulls there...  In fact, I saw a YouTube clip of Lolo Jones doing a gym work and she was using a light weight and using the weights almost like a swinging tool to strengthen OVER-ALL general body exercise (including legs too), pulling action and pushing action and all that as well.  I thought it was very intriguing.  Personally, for distance running, I prefer hill training and drills over weight training.  But, if in the gym, I would prefer this type of exercises over static weight training routine.  But that's just me.

                   

                  The good thing about using free weights, especially the big compound exercises,  and body weight exercises is that you hit a lot of muscles in one go, which is why I've mentioned these exercises.

                   

                  For runners squats are probably the best thing overall - you directly work the big muscles in the legs and bum - the quads, the hamstrings and the glutes. You are also working the calves to some extent and all the muscles in your torso are engaged as you keep good form. You don't really work your arms or shoulders much.

                   

                  Deadlifts, as you say are good for the back, but also the glutes, hamstrings, quads, calves, traps and lats.

                   

                  Overhead presses and/or bench presses make sure you do something for the strength in your shoulders. Bench presses do the pecs, deltoids and triceps. Overhead presses are probably better of the two (you should do them standing) because good form requires all your core muscles to be engaged as you press, but mix it up so that you get a bit of everything.

                   

                  Press-ups, again, do a lot of muscles, specifically the pecs, triceps and anterior deltoids; and the rest of the deltoids to some extent, but again - you have to hold your whole core steady.

                   

                  Pull-ups are principally about the big muscles in the back, but also your shoulders and biceps to some extent - it's not principally a bicep exercise, although it does work them somewhat.

                   

                  Dips are the only exercise I mention that hits the triceps in a big way, and I include it because, as you say, you don't want to develop imbalances, and there's nothing else that really works the triceps hard in the list, but they also work muscles in your chest and shoulders to some extent.

                   

                  Crunches, as you say are for principally for your abs.

                   

                   

                  It's very hard to develop serious imbalances through doing big compound exercises precisely because they hit so many muscle groups. That's one of the potential problems of using machines or isolation exercises that specifically target only single muscle groups. In any case it's pretty unlikely that someone who's a runner and doing a couple of gym sessions a week is going to run into that problem in any case. If you do all the exercises I mention then you certainly hit all the major muscle groups in your body, and pretty much every muscles gets worked to some extent. People who have issues with calves might want to add in some calf raises, but unless there's a good reason it's too specific.

                   

                  Good form is, of course, very important, especially when you start out, as it's quite possible to injure yourself with poor form and muscles not accustomed this kind of work.

                   

                  Certainly dynamic exercises are a good thing too. But this is not an either/or choice - there's nothing to stop you doing some strength work of the type I mention here and some more dynamic stuff as well. Similarly with hill training - these are not mutually exclusive choices. It's a strange criticism to be honest: "don't do X because you could do Y". It only makes sense if doing X actually prevents you from doing Y. Most people like variety - if you possibly can do both X and Y; you'll probably enjoy it more and get something from each.

                  Better I Leave


                     

                    For runners squats are probably the best thing overall - you directly work the big muscles in the legs and bum - the quads, the hamstrings and the glutes. You are also working the calves to some extent and all the muscles in your torso are engaged as you keep good form. You don't really work your arms or shoulders much.

                     

                    I love squats. It's my best lift. Sometimes I'll go light and "bounce" the bar (that's what I call it...a variation of a calf raise of course) on the balls of my feet, off a 4" platform,  to burn my calves.

                    Better I Leave


                      Kinda surprised we're not seeing lunges in here. I have a love/hate relationship with lunges myself. They "hurt so good"...ya know?

                        Great posts above! Many people think core and think crunches or ab specific work. Not ideal. For runners and anyone in sports who are on their feet get the best benefit from doing exercises on your feet like squats, deadlifts, lunges, standing presses, standing everything. I do a lot of

                        my chest/back work standing also. If your feet are on the floor,

                        doing any resistance work, your hips, glutes, torso etc are all

                        engaged and  becomes a total body exercise  and provide more benefit to the core than sitting or lying on a

                        machine with a fixed movement.

                        Those who try, fail! Those who do what it takes to succeed, succeed!!


                        Right on Hereford...

                          http://youtu.be/yXpK3bF9UlA

                           

                          not strictly core, but the link above is the first of a 5-part series for an 8 week general strength progression for runners. Many of the exercises (planks, donkey kicks, etc.) are covered in many books and magazines. This one is from running times.

                           

                          +2

                           

                          Jay Johnson's stuff is the bomb. Here's another link to an article by Jay, with more explanation, photos, and links...

                           

                          http://www.runnersworld.com/race-training/give-me-15-minutes

                            Why don't you just squat? Sorry, just can't let a "core" post go by without posting that.  Even one from 2 months ago.

                             


                            LimpingBehind.com

                              Lots of what pr100 discusses above is also in this book:

                               

                              http://www.amazon.com/New-Rules-Lifting-Abs-Myth-Busting/dp/1583334602

                               

                              It shows you how to incorporate and use your core while also doing whole body/functional/compound moves (uneven weights, one armed moves, etc to force your core to work - one of my favorites is a one-armed chest press on the edge of a bench).

                              Really good stuff.

                               

                              Worrying about the smallest groups of muscles is something I left behind several years ago - if you do multiple joint/compound moves you will use your smaller muscles as they were intended - to compliment the bigger, working muscles.

                               Want a discount code for the San Francisco marathon?  Message me :)

                              runnathon


                                Some great resources.

                                 

                                Now, how about stringing them together in a few sets that allow variety and recovery on a weekly/longer schedule that fits into life?