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Increasing distance (Read 940 times)


Swadvad

    My motivation for running is for basic fitness. I haven't done any races, and don't really care about increasing my speed that much at this time. It appears though that I am still on the low end of distance when compared to most of you folks. I've been painting my house this summer and doing kids activities, which has limited me to running once or twice a week. I also had a nasty sinus infection. Because of that, I now want to get more consistent and run at least 3 or 4 times a week. I'm usually only doing 3 miles at a time. When I try to increase my distance, I feel very tired. I ran 4.5 miles Monday night and right now I don't feel like hitting the street again. Very low energy. Any suggestions on how to get my distance up a bit, without feeling so crappy? Yes
    va


      Here are some ideas... 1. try running more regularly, 3-4 times a week, with a days rest in between each run, make running part of your life 2. if it takes more than a day to recover from a 3 mile run, you're probably running too fast 3. pick a day as your "long run" day (e.g., weekends are good for this), and each week increase by 1/2 mile (e.g., 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, ...) 4. get 8 hours of sleep 5. run in the morning good luck!
        I don't know what everyone else is going to tell you but I know that I would never have been able to make the jump from 3 mile to 4.5 miles. I have been adding my distance slowly over the last couple of months. No more than a 1/2 mile at a time. Anymore than that and my legs and back get really upset with me. If you are like me and are running for the fitness of it and not really training then don't push to hard go with what feels good.

        My sport's your sport's punishment

         

        2012 goals

                      

        100 Km month         150 K month      200K month

        5K run    10K run     20K run              30K run

        sub 30 min 5K         sub 55min 10K

        va


          also, 6. to run longer, run slower
            Slow it down for now till your body adjusts. Also, how's your diet? Are you getting enough "good" carbs to keep up with your new energy demands? Finally, has it been hot? The heat will sap your energy, and you need to keep well hydrated. Many runners are chronically dehydrated which leave you feeling drained. Stick with it till you find what works!


            Swadvad

              Slow it down for now till your body adjusts. Also, how's your diet? Are you getting enough "good" carbs to keep up with your new energy demands? Finally, has it been hot? The heat will sap your energy, and you need to keep well hydrated. Many runners are chronically dehydrated which leave you feeling drained. Stick with it till you find what works!
              It has been hot with very high humidity, and I probably am not getting as much water as I need to. These are all good suggestions. Thanks. Stephen, If I run any slower, I'll be walking! Ha!
              va


                Yes, and then you'll be more like me! Big grin
                  Don't worry about how many miles everyone else runs. Just increase slowly and enjoy yourself. Cool
                  ---- Cynthia


                  Swadvad

                    Don't worry about how many miles everyone else runs. Just increase slowly and enjoy yourself. Cool
                    It's that competitive male thing. I think I should be able to do what everyone else does. Cool I will heed your advice.
                      You aren't running enough for it to become a habit, a part of your life like morning coffee or lunch at noon. I don't think it's because you are physically tired from the workouts, but mentally having difficulty changing your routine. So, think of the habits you have developed (good and bad) and how you went about it. Repeat with running. But be careful, once you get hooked, it may be difficult to quit. Get out the door, yo!
                        There is already some great advice here, particularly slowing down for your long run. I had run a couple of short races, but was still having trouble adding to my long run distance. I was checking a race result on coolrunning.com when I clicked on a banner for runinjuryfree.com, Jeff Galloway's site. He uses walk breaks during runs to allow your muscles to recover, and I decided to borrow his book from the library. Galloway Running has lots of great tips for beginners, even if you don't use his run/walk method. One is a VERY strong recommendation of running at least three times a week to minimize injuries. You can adjust the ratio of walking to running to suit your ability or the conditions for any given run, and make further adjustments during the run. You can use the method to begin with, then eliminate the walk element if you want. Under normal conditions I run for six minutes, then walk for one minute and the method has all but eliminated pain from my running. Now back to your original question.......adding 1.5 miles to your base of 3 miles is a 50% increase. That's a pretty good stretch for you now, but with regular running it will become much easier. I thought Galloway was nuts when he recommended adding a mile to the long run every other week, but by slowing down sufficiently (IIRC, he recommends two minutes per mile below your normal pace) you can do it and feel fatigued but not exhausted. I was amazed to find that it was possible, and that the addition got easier and easier. When you've built up to ten miles, adding another mile is only a 10% increase. I've used the run/walk to finish half marathons in 1:49 and 1:48, and I'm hoping like hell that it will work for my first marathon this November. Whatever you do, buy good shoes, stick with it for the long run (yes, pun intended), and enjoy the rewards of your efforts.

                        E.J.
                        Greater Lowell Road Runners
                        Cry havoc and let slip the dawgs of war!

                        May the road rise to meet you, may the wind be always at your back, may the sun shine warm upon your SPF30, may the rains fall soft upon your sweat-wicking hat, and until you hit the finish line may The Flying Spaghetti Monster hold you in the hollow of His Noodly Appendage.

                          To build on what Jeff said. I read somewhere that it takes 21 days to form a routine or habit. But, it takes less then a week to fall out of that routine or habit. Consistency is the key. Even those days that you feel like utter garbage, it is best to get out and do something. Who knows? You may even feel better after you do that activity!!!! It is easy to do anything when it doesn't hurt or it fits into your schedule. It is hard to do something that you know is going to cause discomfort or you have to rearrange your schedule to fit it in.
                          "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty, and well preserved body, but rather, to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: "WOW... WHAT A RIDE!!!" Muskingum College XC
                            To follow up on what Coach Coop said. Even when you don't feel like it, you need to take that first step. I have had some of my best runs and post run euphoria after finishing a run I did not want to do. Shocked Remember, when you first start, do not measure your progress on miles, measure yourself on time. Increase running from 15 to 20 mins, 20 to 25 mins, 25 to 30 mins, etc... Go from 2 days a week to 3 days, 3 days to 4 days, etc....The mileage will come when your body adjusts to the stress of sustained exercise. The most important advice you can get: Don't give up, you will be amazed on the distances you can run when you give it some time.
                              It's all about just talking yourself into putting on your shoes and getting your tushie out the door! Tell yourself you only have to get in 2 miles, or 20 miles, or twice around the block, or whatever. If you "just" do that, hey, you got in some running, but most of the time, you'll feel so good that you'll want to keep going. Up your distance slowly ... IMO, the slower, the better.
                              2009: BQ?


                              Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

                                I ran 4.5 miles Monday night and right now I don't feel like hitting the street again. Very low energy. Any suggestions on how to get my distance up a bit, without feeling so crappy? Yes
                                Make sure that you don't run on an empty stomach. I can eat right before going out for a run; you may have to eat something a few hours ahead of time. When you are done running, eat something as soon as your stomach will let you. Within 15-30 minutes is preferable (if not as soon as you are done) but definately eat something within an hour of finishing. It doesn't need to be much; a few hundred calories from a granola bar or a glass of juice or a bagel is fine. Find out what your body likes until you hit on the right ratio of carbs/fat/protein. A workout without food immediately following is a waste of time. Your body needs the calories to repair the damage, and if you are looking for basic fitness and losing or maintaining weight then you will continue to burn calories for much longer if you eat right after the workout than if you don't and your body has to shut itself down earlier when it runs out of fuel.

                                Run to Win
                                24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)



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