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Did I run too fast? (Read 811 times)


Slow-smooth-fast

    I have started reading up on speed work, threshold and vo2 max training, and am keen to incorporate 2 speed sessions in my weekly training. I went to the track as I always do last night, and did the training that the instructor laid out. Here is what we did 4 x 600 4 x 400 4 x 300 All where done with a one minute rest between. I did these with maximum effort really, pacing myself to complete them all in a consistent time each. My pace for all these was 600s – 6min/mile 400s – 5:40min/mile 300s – 5:20min/mile These are all on average. How will these sessions benefit me as I worked all out and I have read it is better to go at 90% or something? What other session later in the week should I include to involve speed? PS, my VDOT is 47.

    "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

      I would say yes, you ran a little fast. Not sure exactly what you mean by maximal effort, but you shouldn't be running all out, certainly. For >= 400m, aim for your 5k pace. I don't see a recent 5k in your log, but you can probably find formulas for calculating it based on your recent 10k. I you'd probably be 30s faster than your 10k pace, or something similar. Anyway, run at that pace, then do a recovery jog of half the distance you ran, is a typical guideline. Doing these kind of repeats increase your ability to run at speed for longer distances. For <=>5k), so tempo seem like a good idea, and it is easy to burn out doing laps if you go to the track too often. Hope that is of some use! </=>
        Modified my original post, so this post no longer needed.


        Slow-smooth-fast

          thanks for the advice, I will definitely do the tempo run then later on in the week. I will do 5 miles, what pace should I do this at then? And should I do it in 1 mile repeats or? I am confused as there is vo2 and lactic tolerance to bear in mind. How on earth do you know how hard to push?

          "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009


          Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

            thanks for the advice, I will definitely do the tempo run then later on in the week. I will do 5 miles, what pace should I do this at then? And should I do it in 1 mile repeats or? I am confused as there is vo2 and lactic tolerance to bear in mind. How on earth do you know how hard to push?
            You might have gone a little quick, but if you are able to recover from it then no harm no foul. I would tend to think that you should be a little more concerned with the volume than with the speed. If you haven't been doing speed workout, than that is a great workout! No matter what you do, I recommend making sure that you have at least one rest or recovery day after each speed workout. If you haven't done a lot of speed work before, then you might want to opt for two. Tempo runs are nice to mix in, but if you want to do two interval sessions in one week then you should feel free to do so. Intervals tend to have a slightly better performance benefit than tempo runs. Interval workouts don't need to be done on a track, by the way. You can run different styles of interval work such as fartleks and the like. One of my favorite styles of workout is the fartlek, where you alternate hard and easy running after your warm up.

            Run to Win
            24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)



              Tempo runs are supposed to be comfortably hard. It is hard to getting a more precise definition out of anyone, as everyone seems to have their own rough formula. If you are doing HR training, I think the range is 85-90% or something like that. Normal tempo runs are continuous, not broken up. You can also break them up a little, which makes them a little more like speed work. For continuous runs, you would run a little slower than your 10k race pace. Probably 10k pace + 20 seconds would be a good place to start. Warm up, then run at that pace for 20-30 minutes, and then cool down. These runs expand your stamina. For tempo intervals, you might try something like warm up, run at your expected 10k pace for 2 miles, jog for 3 minutes, run at your expected 10k pace for 2 miles, then cool down. So, say you recently ran a 10k at 7:30 pace, you might try running at a 7:25 or 7:20 pace. You are basically training yourself to run at your upcoming race pace, but giving yourself enough rest that you can do it without over doing it. In my experience, I have a really hard time with tempo intervals, because race pace just isn't available to me on regular workout days. I don't have the race day boost. Just make sure you ease into your speed work. Increasing intensity is just as hard as increasing mileage, as far as your body is concerned.
                Run to Win: I found the study you linked to to be interesting, so I looked up some more info about it. For those interested, here are some additional facts: - Group A ran 2 tempo session per week, for 30 minutes apiece at close to lactate threshold velocity. - Group B ran 2 interval sessions per week, running 200s (33-38s) and 400s (75-80s), totalling 3 miles per session. - Both groups ran 2 races following 10 weeks of the above training, an 800 and a 10k. - 800, compared to their previous: - Group A improved 6.6 sec avg. - Group B improved 11.2 sec avg. - 10k, compared to their previous: - Group A improved 1.1 minute avg. - Group B improved 2.1 minute avg. Apparently, the biggest factor is matching race speed with your training speed. According to Snell, who conductied the study:
                "Perhaps the best way to train is to spend the maximum-possible amount of time running at a pace which is closely related to the demands (or pace) of the race you're shooting for, without getting overtrained."
                So maybe tempo intervals are better than regular tempo runs, in that regard. I don't know that I'll change things up drastically, based on that, but it was definitely interesting.


                Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

                  So maybe tempo intervals are better than regular tempo runs, in that regard. I don't know that I'll change things up drastically, based on that, but it was definitely interesting.
                  Yeah, I thought that it was very interesting myself when I read it. Generally speaking, my seasons go like this (arrows denote the direction my mileage is going): Recovery -> mixing in tempos -> mixing in tempos & intervals -> mostly intervals <-> marathon <-> more speed work) Depending upon what season it depends upon how quickly I get back on the bandwagon. In the spring, I reverse my taper and keep going, in the fall I tend to take a month off with just weight lifting and maybe some swimming, but no biking or running. This year I might run a 50k and a marathon in the fall, so the 50k will be treated like a spring marathon.</-></->

                  Run to Win
                  24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)