DUDES only RUN (Read 548 times)

NHLA


    I ran in a man-hater race by accident.  Only about 50 guys showed up. They treated us like wife beating child rapist. They had banners up about men beating there wives to death.

    If I had known that men were not welcome I would not have come. They did take my money.


    Awesome

      Big Man Run: http://baevents.com/bigmanrun/information.html

       

      There you go. Of course, they also like you to be fat.


      HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

        Big Man Run: http://baevents.com/bigmanrun/information.html

         

        There you go. Of course, they also like you to be fat.

         

        It involves beer drinking and hot dogs, so it is really all about health.

        It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

           

          OP, you may not like it but if you're truly looking to understand something that you don't get...

           

          Isn't that the point of asking a question... wanting to understand something one doesn't get?

          running is somewhat like playing golf to me.   crappy shots all day long, ready to give it up & wondering why I'm trying so hard just to get this stupid little ball into a stupid little hole but then out of the blue comes a monster drive or a long putt that actually gets into the cup.  bingo! that one shot keeps me going for the rest of day no matter how crappy I continue to play & gets me back out again on another day.   strange. -- skyedog

             

            LOL!

             

            OP, you may not like it but if you're truly looking to understand something that you don't get, Sugnim's answer was pretty much the explanation of why.  Participation in athletics has historically been very low for women and many of these races are an attempt just to get women out there.  I'll use an example from RA.  There was a post yesterday where someone compared there AGs in a certain race over time.  For the first 3 years of that race, my AG current didn't exist for women.  For the next decade, my PR would have consistently been top 3.  I found that so sad that I didn't reply to the thread...  I'll add that I ran my first women "only" race this year.  (FWIW, most of these races allow a limited number of men to participate so it's not the same type of banning that women faced in the past.  If you want to run a race with "Princess" in the title, go right on ahead.  Don't forget your tutu).  It was awesome for other reasons but also because I didn't have to play "I'm not gonna get chicked" psycho-head games with some dude.  No guy gasping for breath to pass me, getting in my line and then immediately slowing down.  No guy coming up to ask whether he managed to outkick me at the finish as if I'm his rabbit rather than congratulating me on a great race.  Seriously, the next guy that does this might get punched in the throat*.

             

            *This is a joke.

            Okay. On a second read, part of your post and some examples sound sexist... although I am sure that wasn't your intention.

             

            Races allowing limited number of men are worse (although not your doing). What if there were men only races allowing only limited number of women to stay politically correct?

             

            Why would you challenge the OP to run a race with "Princess" in the title? I could totally see myself doing that in a father daughter run or any race that supports running for women or breast cancer or similar.

             

            Why do you care about how guys run around you or other women... that's the problem of those guys not yours. Again, think about how you would react if a guy had written something like that... "I don't have to worry about slowing down because of a woman or group of women running in front of me"... that's just sexist.

             

            There are all kinds of people, some of them are jerks. For me, running behind a woman has proven to be beneficial in my last 3-4 runs. Each time I randomly came across a woman who was slightly faster than me - I simply ran behind them at a safe distance. They helped me improve my speed. One girl was so consistent without any gadget, I felt like applauding her towards the end of my run but dropped the idea at the risk of coming across as a creepy guy who was following her.

             

            Personally I don't think women only races are a bad idea. I have observed that women feel more supported and comfortable around other women. If that (or whatever else for that matter) gets them to run, there is nothing wrong with it.

            running is somewhat like playing golf to me.   crappy shots all day long, ready to give it up & wondering why I'm trying so hard just to get this stupid little ball into a stupid little hole but then out of the blue comes a monster drive or a long putt that actually gets into the cup.  bingo! that one shot keeps me going for the rest of day no matter how crappy I continue to play & gets me back out again on another day.   strange. -- skyedog

              I ran in a man-hater race by accident.  Only about 50 guys showed up. They treated us like wife beating child rapist. They had banners up about men beating there wives to death.

              If I had known that men were not welcome I would not have come. They did take my money.

               

              That's the problem with exclusive races of any kind. In this case they assumed your guilt by association.

               

              I can happily support theme based races such as a race against domestic violence. Then, it is easy to welcome men who would like to support the cause and stand up against men who beat up their wives.

               

              I am just curious, did you see any men hold any of those banners? I wonder whether it would change the men hating attitude of the crowd if some men had picked up the banners to show support.

              running is somewhat like playing golf to me.   crappy shots all day long, ready to give it up & wondering why I'm trying so hard just to get this stupid little ball into a stupid little hole but then out of the blue comes a monster drive or a long putt that actually gets into the cup.  bingo! that one shot keeps me going for the rest of day no matter how crappy I continue to play & gets me back out again on another day.   strange. -- skyedog

                As a woman, I do appreciate the chance to compete in a single-gender environment occasionally, and it has nothing to do with being 'intimidated' by men.  I am a pretty average runner, and I usually finish roughly in the top 40-50% overall, or around the top 20-30% of women.  I am never in the running for any AG awards, but the first time I was in a women's-only race, and I saw how close I was to the start line (it was seeded) and I saw all the other runners around me, who were as serious as I was, it really changed the way I saw myself as a runner.  The times I finish with-- let's say a 24:00 5K-- are times that a lot of guys can just roll out of bed and hit, without a lot of serious training.  But most women running those times are either naturally talented or at least a little serious about their training.  It's a different experience racing a bunch of guys who run maybe once or twice a week versus the experience of racing a bunch of women who are pretty dedicated and serious.

                 

                That said, I think the best way to accomplish it is the way I've seen it done at a couple races in my area-- the women and the men both run the same race, but with different start times (8:00/9:00 for a 5-mile race, for example, so there's little to no overlap).  This gives everyone the best of both worlds: Men and women both get to race, they get to compete only against people in their own gender, and everyone has a built-in cheering squad, as the men cheer for the women and the women cheer for the men.  It's everything I enjoy about women-only races, without excluding anyone.  Now, of course none of these have a princess theme or diamonds at the end-- personally, I am more than OK with that.

                Best post of the thread.

                running is somewhat like playing golf to me.   crappy shots all day long, ready to give it up & wondering why I'm trying so hard just to get this stupid little ball into a stupid little hole but then out of the blue comes a monster drive or a long putt that actually gets into the cup.  bingo! that one shot keeps me going for the rest of day no matter how crappy I continue to play & gets me back out again on another day.   strange. -- skyedog
                Julia1971


                All in for Boston

                  Re: OP wanting to understand something.  Often times on message boards people just want to troll and/or rant rather than truly understanding the other side of an issue.  So, you reply at your own risk.

                   

                   

                  Races allowing limited number of men are worse (although not your doing). What if there were men only races allowing only limited number of women to stay politically correct?

                   

                  Why would you challenge the OP to run a race with "Princess" in the title? I could totally see myself doing that in a father daughter run or any race that supports running for women or breast cancer or similar.

                   

                   

                  Yes, not my doing.  Just pointing out to the OP that these races are not actually women only.  Men can and do run them.  And, the "Princess" comment was a joke.

                   

                  Why do you care about how guys run around you or other women... that's the problem of those guys not yours. Again, think about how you would react if a guy had written something like that... "I don't have to worry about slowing down because of a woman or group of women running in front of me"... that's just sexist.

                   

                   

                  Jerky running behavior is a mild annoyance.  That's all.  I've also ranted about people running off my shoulder and flat-footed runners.  I'm not crying about it.  It's something I notice but not something I let ruin my race...   If a guy wrote that, I probably wouldn't reply but if I did, I would probably suggest he pass them.

                   


                  There are all kinds of people, some of them are jerks. For me, running behind a woman has proven to be beneficial in my last 3-4 runs. Each time I randomly came across a woman who was slightly faster than me - I simply ran behind them at a safe distance. They helped me improve my speed. One girl was so consistent without any gadget, I felt like applauding her towards the end of my run but dropped the idea at the risk of coming across as a creepy guy who was following her.

                   

                   

                  Why would running behind a woman be any less or more beneficial than running behind a man?  I'm not sure I understand this part.

                   

                  Personally I don't think women only races are a bad idea. I have observed that women feel more supported and comfortable around other women. If that (or whatever else for that matter) gets them to run, there is nothing wrong with it.

                   

                  Okay.  Good to know.  Have a great day!

                  Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage. - Anais Nin

                    Why would running behind a woman be any less or more beneficial than running behind a man?  I'm not sure I understand this part.

                     

                    In my experience, women are better at running than men. Maybe this is because (for example) a <3:00:00 marathon is easier for a male 20-29 to achieve than a female 20-29 to achieve so the women running the same pace as the men are better trained.

                     

                    At a marathon last year, there was a 40-49 YO woman who was running around the 7min pace that I wanted so I followed her through the half. I never saw her check her watch, but every mile was within a few seconds of 7 minutes. After the half I pushed the pace though mile 18 and then crashed and ended up finishing ~30 minutes behind her.

                     

                    In the spring it was all guys in the 20-39 AG running around me at the marathon and my mile splits were as fast as 6:14 and as slow as ~7:50.

                     

                    When in doubt, don't follow the men: we don't have a clue what we're doing out there!


                    HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                       

                      In my experience, women are better at running than men. Maybe this is because (for example) a <3:00:00 marathon is easier for a male 20-29 to achieve than a female 20-29 to achieve so the women running the same pace as the men are better trained.

                       

                      ...

                       

                      That's an interesting hypothesis - one that's never occurred to me.

                      It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.


                      HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                        As a woman, I do appreciate the chance to compete in a single-gender environment occasionally, and it has nothing to do with being 'intimidated' by men.  I am a pretty average runner, and I usually finish roughly in the top 40-50% overall, or around the top 20-30% of women.  I am never in the running for any AG awards, but the first time I was in a women's-only race, and I saw how close I was to the start line (it was seeded) and I saw all the other runners around me, who were as serious as I was, it really changed the way I saw myself as a runner.  The times I finish with-- let's say a 24:00 5K-- are times that a lot of guys can just roll out of bed and hit, without a lot of serious training.  But most women running those times are either naturally talented or at least a little serious about their training.  It's a different experience racing a bunch of guys who run maybe once or twice a week versus the experience of racing a bunch of women who are pretty dedicated and serious.

                         

                        That said, I think the best way to accomplish it is the way I've seen it done at a couple races in my area-- the women and the men both run the same race, but with different start times (8:00/9:00 for a 5-mile race, for example, so there's little to no overlap).  This gives everyone the best of both worlds: Men and women both get to race, they get to compete only against people in their own gender, and everyone has a built-in cheering squad, as the men cheer for the women and the women cheer for the men.  It's everything I enjoy about women-only races, without excluding anyone.  Now, of course none of these have a princess theme or diamonds at the end-- personally, I am more than OK with that.

                         

                        This is how a lot of the championship races are run, right? Olympics, World Cross, World Indoor & Outdoor Track -- and in the US, US Track Championships, much of collegiate and high school track and cross country (*).

                         

                        * But sometimes they run boys, girls, and JV (both genders).

                         

                        So I suppose it makes sense to offer regular women the opportunity to experience this type of competition - the experience that is usual and probably taken-for-granted by scholastic and elite women runners.

                        It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

                          I really don't understand the argument or answers from either side.

                          I consider a race to be a time trial.
                          I'm not racing 'you'.

                          I'm racing myself and my own ability (and untapped inability).

                          I never want to consider a race as 'good' or 'bad' based on how I finish within the race compared to 'you'.

                           

                          I think that creating environments that encourage activity should be embraced (princess runs).

                          I think that other types of events (ie. color runs) also create an excellent active culture environment.

                          I don't need a "DUDES only RUN" in order to meet my needs but recognize that others might want a "Chicks only Run" or a "Dudes only Run" in order to meet their needs..

                           

                          Cheers,

                          2014 Goals:

                          #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                          #2: 365 Hours training

                           

                          Julia1971


                          All in for Boston

                             

                            In my experience, women are better at running than men. Maybe this is because (for example) a <3:00:00 marathon is easier for a male 20-29 to achieve than a female 20-29 to achieve so the women running the same pace as the men are better trained.

                             

                            At a marathon last year, there was a 40-49 YO woman who was running around the 7min pace that I wanted so I followed her through the half. I never saw her check her watch, but every mile was within a few seconds of 7 minutes. After the half I pushed the pace though mile 18 and then crashed and ended up finishing ~30 minutes behind her.

                             

                            In the spring it was all guys in the 20-39 AG running around me at the marathon and my mile splits were as fast as 6:14 and as slow as ~7:50.

                             

                            When in doubt, don't follow the men: we don't have a clue what we're doing out there!

                             

                            Sexist!  Joking

                             

                            You know, I've been complimented on my pacing before and I've always assumed it's because I do a lot of treadmill running and almost always run with my Garmin.

                            Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage. - Anais Nin

                            Meat Wagon


                            Puker

                               What are your thoughts?

                               

                              My thought is that worrying about things like this seems like a miserable way to go through life.

                              Feel sick and dirty, more dead than alive.

                              Julia1971


                              All in for Boston

                                I mentioned up thread somewhere that I didn't think this was done in a race here but then remembered Cherry Blossom had a separate start for the elite women this year since it was the National 10 Mile Championship.

                                 

                                 

                                This is how a lot of the championship races are run, right? Olympics, World Cross, World Indoor & Outdoor Track -- and in the US, US Track Championships, much of collegiate and high school track and cross country (*).

                                 

                                * But sometimes they run boys, girls, and JV (both genders).

                                 

                                So I suppose it makes sense to offer regular women the opportunity to experience this type of competition - the experience that is usual and probably taken-for-granted by scholastic and elite women runners.

                                Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage. - Anais Nin