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Protein shake after workouts (Read 1431 times)

    If anything, I would think a competitive hobby jogger who is on-the-go has even less need of protein shakes after workouts.

     Why?

    "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

    Scout7


    CPT Curmudgeon

       Why?

       

      Firstly, after running, the body needs carbohydrates more than protein; generally the ratio given is at 4:1 carbs to protein.  Some research has shown that athletes who engage in training sessions of 2 hours or longer could benefit from additional supplementation, but even then it is not a huge amount more.  The recommended consumption for endurance athletes is somewhere between 1.2-1.4 grams per kilogram of body weight daily.

       

      Secondly, what good is extra protein going to do a person?  Very little.  The body generally cannot store extra protein, so you literally end up pissing it away.

       

      Thirdly, why use a protein shake, when eating something like fruit, nuts, or veggies will work just as well?

        If anything, I would think a competitive hobby jogger who is on-the-go has even less need of protein shakes after workouts.

         

        don't you realize that invalidates their entire business model?  There's more  "hobby joggers" than elites, and  they need the hobby joggers to buy their protein.  

          Firstly, after running, the body needs carbohydrates more than protein; generally the ratio given is at 4:1 carbs to protein.  Some research has shown that athletes who engage in training sessions of 2 hours or longer could benefit from additional supplementation, but even then it is not a huge amount more.  The recommended consumption for endurance athletes is somewhere between 1.2-1.4 grams per kilogram of body weight daily.

           

          Secondly, what good is extra protein going to do a person?  Very little.  The body generally cannot store extra protein, so you literally end up pissing it away.

           

          Thirdly, why use a protein shake, when eating something like fruit, nuts, or veggies will work just as well?

           

          I am not really arguing for protein shakes (I have no horse in that race), but against the citation to "what the elites do."  

            

          Anyways, if you want to get technical, hard running (especially when hills are involved) is akin to weight lifting.  Weight lifters tend to go for protein within 10-15 minutes.  The carbs can come within the next two hours.  

           

          All of this is against the backdrop of life.  I may not choose to go live in the "getting in carbs and protein" world, but this thread has nothing to do with me.

           

          I think the OP was just saying "Hey, I like this stuff."   

          "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

          DoppleBock


            I would guess most of these athletes are running significant mileage to race the 1500 - 12k.  Likely 100+ miles a week.   I find it curious if this is the case - Say they are running 120 MPW and burn @ 100 calories per mile = 12,000.  Say a young fit male has a base of 2500 calories per day = 17,500 per week + 12,000 = 29,500 / 7 = 4,200 calories per day needed.  They are eating 3,000 per day per the article.  Which if you eat at the right times and you burn a certian fat / glycogen mix you can exist this way without getting low on glycogen, but you would be losing 2.4 pounds of fat per week ~ most these runners do not have a lot of body fat. 

             

            So either they are in a state of starvation or some other metabolic condition that they are only at a base of 1,200 calories needed, or they do not burn 100 calories per mile, or they are eating more than the report - maybe they adjusted their intake because they knew it was being monitored.  I guess the other possibility is that they are only running 5-7 miles per day or 40-50 per week in training.

             

             

             

            1500m to 12K = endurance athletes?

             

            Aside from that, it jives with my belief that a balanced diet without excessive protein and fat is what we need.  Duh.  The fancy and expensive supplements that are marketed to athletes are pretty much snake oil.

            http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

            2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

             

            DoppleBock


              I take whey protein because I am lazy ~ there are times I get done with a run and its easier to drink my recovery than the eat it.  Plus usually after runs > 4 hours I like to take 50 grams of protein.  But yes I am brain washed.  I used to eat a nice bowl of raisan bran immediately after I ran and that worked nicely too.  Then I got lazy and started to drink a slimfast - Then I migrated to Endurox and whey protein.

              http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

              2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

               

                I would guess most of these athletes are running significant mileage to race the 1500 - 12k.  Likely 100+ miles a week.   I find it curious if this is the case - Say they are running 120 MPW and burn @ 100 calories per mile = 12,000.  Say a young fit male has a base of 2500 calories per day = 17,500 per week + 12,000 = 29,500 / 7 = 4,200 calories per day needed.  They are eating 3,000 per day per the article.  Which if you eat at the right times and you burn a certian fat / glycogen mix you can exist this way without getting low on glycogen, but you would be losing 2.4 pounds of fat per week ~ most these runners do not have a lot of body fat. 

                 

                So either they are in a state of starvation or some other metabolic condition that they are only at a base of 1,200 calories needed, or they do not burn 100 calories per mile, or they are eating more than the report - maybe they adjusted their intake because they knew it was being monitored.  I guess the other possibility is that they are only running 5-7 miles per day or 40-50 per week in training.

                 

                Interesting numbers.  Maybe some of our assumptions don't apply as universally as we think.  Maybe they are more efficient than 100 kcal/mile, or their base daily calories are less than 2500, for whatever reasons.  Also, the article puts their weekly mileage in the range of 70 - 100.

                Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                  I take whey protein because I am lazy ~ there are times I get done with a run and its easier to drink my recovery than the eat it.  Plus usually after runs > 4 hours I like to take 50 grams of protein.  But yes I am brain washed.  I used to eat a nice bowl of raisan bran immediately after I ran and that worked nicely too.  Then I got lazy and started to drink a slimfast - Then I migrated to Endurox and whey protein.

                   

                  Yeah, I understand wanting to get protein and carbs fast after putting in a lot of miles.

                  Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                    This is one thing that I don't over-complicate: I try to have something like a chocolate milk fairly quickly after a long or harder run.  Mostly, it's just because I'm not in the mental or gastric mood for solid food that soon after harder efforts.

                     

                    For those who run on their lunch hours (and can't traipse around the office all sweaty, don't have a pantry in the locker room, are somewhat time-pressed, etc.), it's also quicker and more convenient -- you can stick a bottle of chocolate milk in your locker when you change, and it'll still be cold 50min later.

                    “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

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