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USATF race certification (Read 467 times)


A Dance with Monkeys

    Specifically, this means that a certified distance is AT LEAST the stated distance, when measured on the tangents. The tangents are defined, I believe, as being one food away from the inner edge of any curve in the road. Typically, courses are as much as 1-2% more than the stated distance to ensure that they are not too short. So a 10 mile course could be 10.2 miles, although most are probably closer to 10.0 - 10.05 miles, I would expect. I believe that every mile or kilometer must likewise be certified. Certification requires that a certified person measure the course using an approved tool, such as a wooden rimmed bike or a wooden wheel. Our Monkey Marathon was not certified on purpose, to allow it to have a relatively renegade feel. We measured the course using runningahead.com and GPS data, as well as prior certifications of segments of the course from other races. After the race, when Jeff scored such a hot time, 2:50, many thought the course must be too short by a mile or more. This of course was not true, but somebody actually went out and measured it on a bike, following the tangents. In the end, the course was two yards shy of the marathon distance, when run on the tangents. Which is to say, most runners likely ran the complete distance anyway. Next year, we will be sure to add them 2 yards Wink
      thank you for explaining! I sometimes I really want to share my garmin time and distance as opposed to the official times, LOL! But I'm learning to let.it.go. Yes and I must say, I was looking at your FMM site last night for quite a while. omgosh. it's so tempting! I just know that my husband would think I've lost my mind wanting to travel that far for a race. I'm gonna have to earn some serious SAHM currency... Shy
      Jennifer mm#1231


      A Dance with Monkeys

        From the USATF website: What are USATF-Certified Courses? A USATF-certified course is a road race course whose distance has been certified for accuracy. Courses must be certified for any road running performance to be accepted as a record or to be nationally ranked. Furthermore, running a race on a certified course allows you to accurately compare your time to performances run on other certified courses because you can be sure the distances were the same. No one can truly establish a personal best if the course distance is not accurate. Race Directors: Click here for information about how to get your course certified


        A Dance with Monkeys

          and I must say, I was looking at your FMM site last night for quite a while. omgosh. it's so tempting! I just know that my husband would think I've lost my mind wanting to travel that far for a race. I'm gonna have to earn some serious SAHM currency... Shy
          Ha, thank you! We did have folks from around the country last year, our inaugural run. Traveling for marathons is great fun, especially when you can combine them with other things. In the past year, during my 8 marathons, two were at home, one was combined with a visit to my parents, one was combined with a family trip, and two were combined with work conferences. That leaves only two that required travel for travel's sake. So come on out in November! Big grin
          RunningHammer


            Same thing applies in the UK. I looked up the rules for road events from the UK athletics board responsible for certifying road courses. Rule 205 (ii) states
            The measured distance must not be less than the advertised distance of the race, nor should it exceed the advertised distance by more than 0.1%.
            That means for a 10km race, the course could be up to 10m longer. A marathon course could be up to 42m too long!