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Anyone know anything about VO2 Max? (Read 1257 times)


I've got a fever...

    I was using the VO2 max calculator on the site here to estimate my VO2 max for various distances, based on my race PRs (most of which were run about 16~20 years ago, and unfortunately not a reflection of me now), and I noticed that as distance went up, my estimated VO2 max went steadily downward: 800m 68.8 ------------------ 1600m 64.5 3200m 63.0 5k 62.8 10k 59.4 15k 60.0 25k 58.4 Now, I draw a line between 800m and the rest of the distances. That event is much more anaerobic that the longer races, so I don't think it's fair to compare. So here's my questions looking at the 1600m on up: 1) does the fact that the number goes down as distance goes up mean that my shorter races are of higher quality (i.e. I'm a better short distance runner than longer)? 2) Or does it mean I could have raced faster at the longer distances with better efforts/training? 3) Is this trend typical? I realize that this range represents an variation of only +/-4.9%, so maybe the trend means nothing. Just curious, thanks for your help! Confused

    On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.


    A Dance with Monkeys

      The calculator on this site only estimates your VO2max from your efforts. Every effort is associated with a rate of oxygen delivery to your muscles (i.e., you VO2), but you only have one maximal VO2. The only way to know your VO2max is by testing in an exercise physiology lab. The reason that you see diminishing VO2max estimates with increasing distance is that your pace likely is diminishing as well. The estimates are calculated using an equation that takes pace into consideration. But remember, these estimates are all lower than your actual VO2max, which does not vary.


      I've got a fever...

        Thanks Trent. Interesting. Ok, so short from a going to a lab, should I assume that my VO2 max was 64.5 and that my longer races didn't quite match up to my potential? Thanks! Smile

        On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.


        A Dance with Monkeys

          Right. Nice VO2max, BTW.


          I've got a fever...

            Nice VO2max, BTW.
            Thanks Trent Smile, but like I said, 16~20 years ago. Now, it's all about running a little, stretching a lot, and dieting the pounds off before I can think about being serious.

            On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

            jAs


              The calculator on this site only estimates your VO2max from your efforts. Every effort is associated with a rate of oxygen delivery to your muscles (i.e., you VO2), but you only have one maximal VO2. The only way to know your VO2max is by testing in an exercise physiology lab. The reason that you see diminishing VO2max estimates with increasing distance is that your pace likely is diminishing as well. The estimates are calculated using an equation that takes pace into consideration. But remember, these estimates are all lower than your actual VO2max, which does not vary.
              There is another way to test VO2max without the lab... the following link explains: http://www.brianmac.demon.co.uk/treadmill.htm I've never tried the method since my treadmill only inclines 10 degrees and i've never seen the need to run till i vomit or pass out. Dead


              I've got a fever...

                There is another way to test VO2max without the lab... the following link explains: http://www.brianmac.demon.co.uk/treadmill.htm I've never tried the method since my treadmill only inclines 10 degrees and i've never seen the need to run till i vomit or pass out. Dead
                Thanks for the link. The site you mentioned seems to also have some kinder, gentler alternatives, like checking your heart rate after going up and down a 16-1/4" step for 3 minutes. I may not be in peak shape, but I'm pretty sure I can do that without puking Wink

                On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

                muse_runner


                keep running.

                  I wanna know where this calculator you speak of is. I already use Daniels but I'm always looking for new toys!!! Big grin
                  running until I hit 1900 miles for the year. whether fast or slow I will just run.


                  A Dance with Monkeys

                    Nope. These are all just estimates. Some are pretty close. But they are just estimates nonetheless. For example, the treadmill test may not give your actual VO2 if you do it while tired and then do not get up to your maximal potential. Gotta do the lab and measure your actual O2 usage. Big grin