123

Runner collapese and dies in 10K (Read 1850 times)


A Saucy Wench

    She was not properly trained.  Um, sounds like your sleep training is lacking as well.

     Well, good to know I'll die 5 minutes before my alarm goes off.

    I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

     

    "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

       Well, good to know I'll die 5 minutes before my alarm goes off.

       

      If you're dead, and your alarm goes off,  is it still your alarm?  Or does it belong to someone else?

       

      A neighbour died mowing the lawn.  Gardening should come up with a health warning too. 

       "Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow.  Don't walk behind me; I may not lead.  Just walk beside me and be my friend."


      A Saucy Wench

        If you're dead, and your alarm goes off,  is it still your alarm?  Or does it belong to someone else?

         

         

         The bigger question is how long will it take dh to realize I am dead and not either a) ignoring the alarm or b) already out running and merely forgot to turn it off. 

         

        I say he shuts it off, goes back to sleep, gets up when his alarm goes off, takes shower, gets ready for work, gets the kids up, starts getting pissed at me that I am not back from running yet because he needs to go to work, calls my cell, leaves message on my cell about "what is the point of you having a cell since it is here in the kitchen and you arent", finally goes upstairs to log in to work to deliver his morning meeting report and finally sees me. 

        I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

         

        "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7


        HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

          ..., calls my cell, leaves message on my cell about "what is the point of you having a cell since it is here in the kitchen and you arent",

           

          This was my favorite part

          It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

            Yeah, I was troubled by that until we learned of his heart defect which had been previously diagnosed. I wonder if we will ever fid out what killed the firefighter in October. If someone like Jim Fixx dies with heart disease or Ryan Shay dies with a diagnosed defect, I think most of us are reassured by a known cause. If however someone with no abnormalities just flips into a fatal arrhythmia, really almost randomly, well that's a little more scary. I'll keep running either way, but it does make question how hard I should push it right near the end.

             

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sudden_cardiac_death

             

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertrophic_cardiomyopathy

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sudden_cardiac_death

               

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertrophic_cardiomyopathy

               

              So hypertrophic cardiomyopathy would be found in 20 - 50 participants in any race with 10000 runners.  Someone will die in some race.

              Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                So hypertrophic cardiomyopathy would be found in 20 - 50 participants in any race with 10000 runners...

                 

                I'm not sure that follows - 10000 participants in a running race are not the same thing as 10000 randomly selected individuals from the whole population.

                  So hypertrophic cardiomyopathy would be found in 20 - 50 participants in any race with 10000 runners.  Someone will die in some race.

                   

                  If true, and I don't want to debate whether that is with this specific post because it's possible that a higher percentage of people that have the condition do not join races, ... why don't 20 - 50 die?  Maybe, if only 1 dies, but there are more with it, they approach the race different than others... For example, they don't go all out in the last mile...

                   

                  And I know that some will probably go ape crazy on those words since it's a "race", but I tend to believe that some exposure to heart challenges during racing has to do with going all out.

                  2014 Goals:

                  #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                  #2: 365 Hours training

                   

                    I'm not sure that follows - 10000 participants in a running race are not the same thing as 10000 randomly selected individuals from the whole population.

                     

                    Yeah, I know.

                    Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                      Is anyone here running to extend the length of their lives, or to reduce the chance of death before old age? That's not why I run, but I know some who run for those reasons.

                       

                      Is anyone here racing to extend the length of their lives, or to reduce the chance of death before old age?  I don't race for that, and I know no one who races for those reasons. 

                       

                      Now, quality of life - that has to do with both (and with probably every other decision each of us makes).

                        I don't run to cheat death since nobody gets out alive anyway. I run because I enjoy it, because it prolongs the illusion/delusion of youth, and because I am fairly good at it. Disability is far scarier than death since death is unavoidable, and I do think there is a lower chance that I will live the last 20-30 years of my life in some state of disability. I use a heart rate monitor, mainly to keep myself from going too hard on easy days, but also to gauge overall trends in my fitness. My best races have all seen me hit my HR max of 200, always at the very end. I FEEL like I am about to die just after stopping, but then of course I don't. Perhaps it's riskier to go BOTT at the end, and if there is some valid scientific evidence of this, I might not surge like that. I like racing a good race, but it's not worth dropping dead prematurely. My dilemma is that while some do die surging at the end, others die on an easy five mile recovery run too, and some of those deaths happen to very accomplished runners and (this year) coaches. So are all these happening to people with underlying heart conditions or are some of these just random chance?
                        yingxuy


                          spam
                          123