12

Any good Half Marathon / 10K books for advanced runners? (Read 1350 times)


Black-Toe-Nailed

    I mean something like Pfizinger's "Advanced Marathoning".

     

    I did train for a half adapting a 35 miles/week marathon scheme last year.... but it's not the same. I

     

    I don't think that running 20 milers makes much sense and the marathon pace runs should be surely shorter and at Half Marathon pace.

    Up to this point i would say that I could tailor my own scheme, but I don't know what intervals, how many and how to put into the mix.

     

    I am comfortable with 55-60 miles/week but I have no idea if it is actually a good idea to do this many miles.

     

    I added a HM earlier this year after just a couple of weeks of trainign for my last marathon and was able to do it in 1:39 without pushing too hard so that I would say that I should be able to do a sub 1:15 easily with a dedicated and specific training.

     

    And a 10K is something completely different again.  I have been doing time trials on trial circuits as a part of my marathon training and managed to do them under or close to 40 mins. so that I think that I can set a goal of a sub 35' or close to 30' 10K with enough dedicated training. 

     

    What I am missing now is a Pfizinger !

    Yes, there are a lot of online programs, but these are generally oe-size-fits-all schemes and mostly for beginners. What I need is something where the aim and logic of the scheme is explained so that you can adapt it to your own goals... yes, exactly like the Pfizinger.

     

    Thanks in advance for the recommendations! 

    --

    "If one can stick to the training throughout the many long years,
    then will power is no longer a problem. It's raining? That doesn't matter.
    I am tired? That's besides the point. It's simply that I just have to."

    Emil Zatopek

      I added a HM earlier this year after just a couple of weeks of trainign for my last marathon and was able to do it in 1:39 without pushing too hard so that I would say that I should be able to do a sub 1:15 easily with a dedicated and specific training.

       

      And a 10K is something completely different again.  I have been doing time trials on trial circuits as a part of my marathon training and managed to do them under or close to 40 mins. so that I think that I can set a goal of a sub 35' or close to 30' 10K with enough dedicated training. 

       

      If nothing else, I admire your confidence in setting those goals.

       

      If you already have Advanced Marathoning, (and have really digested what's in there) it holds the basics of what you need for the half. Sure, you might cut down the long runs (maybe), and speed up the tempos / intervals. If you're looking for a sheet that reads "do this monday, do this tuesday, etc. at x speed" for the half and you will run a 1:15, not sure that exists. I believe (could be wrong) the training principles in AM apply as well for the half, and you're probably as well off adjusting the plans in there on your own accordingly for the distance.

      Come all you no-hopers, you jokers and rogues
      We're on the road to nowhere, let's find out where it goes


      Bruno

        Two that I like (and one is Pfitzinger) are Road Racing for Serious Runners: Multispeed Training- 5K to Marathon. (Pfitzinger and Douglas) The Competitive Runner's Handbook: The Bestselling Guide to Running 5Ks through Marathons (Bob and Shelly Glover)


        Bruno

          Two that I like (and one is Pfitzinger) are Road Racing for Serious Runners: Multispeed Training- 5K to Marathon. (Pfitzinger and Douglas) and The Competitive Runner's Handbook: The Bestselling Guide to Running 5Ks through Marathons (Bob and Shelly Glover)


          Black-Toe-Nailed

            Thank you all folks!

             

            I have bought them both and I am right now reading my way through the Pfizinger.

             

            The reason for wanting to read this stuff in books is that I don't just want to use an off the shelf plan but I don't want to just experiment around. "Advanced Marathoning" proved to be an outstanding sorce of information and I was able to score 3 PR this year, with my 3:21:47 marathon, a 1:39Tight lippedx after a few weeks of training and a 42:28 at the final 10K. All that was thanks to the fact that I knew what I was doing, whit which purpose and at what time (well, let's say 80% of the time, lol).

             

            In fact I have already learned that I was right in thinking that the different distances put a different stress on the types of training (lactate, VO2max, etc) and that these are very different from the one used for a 26 miler.

             

            And well... I'm basically a nerd reconverted from hacking with computer code into hacking his own body. I love understanding the system and processes involved and all the planning is for me just part of the fun. And as I commented earlier my approach is showing results Wink

             

            Thanks again !

            --

            "If one can stick to the training throughout the many long years,
            then will power is no longer a problem. It's raining? That doesn't matter.
            I am tired? That's besides the point. It's simply that I just have to."

            Emil Zatopek


            HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer


               ...

              I added a HM earlier this year after just a couple of weeks of trainign for my last marathon and was able to do it in 1:39 without pushing too hard so that I would say that I should be able to do a sub 1:15 easily with a dedicated and specific training.

               ...

              And a 10K is something completely different again.  I have been doing time trials on trial circuits as a part of my marathon training and managed to do them under or close to 40 mins. so that I think that I can set a goal of a sub 35' or close to 30' 10K with enough dedicated training. 

               ...

               

              I wonder which is more challenging:

              * Improving HM from 1:39 to easily sub-1:15

              * Improve 10K from 40m to sub-35 to nearly 30

               

              I think the nearly 30m 10K sounds most challenging.

              It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

                At the advice of some others on a different thread, I've recently picked up Run Faster from the 5K to the Marathon by Brad Hudson and Matt Fitzgerald.

                 

                While I'm still going through it, I think it's safe to add my name to the others that have recommended it.

                 

                The authors do a good job of breaking down various considerations that need to be taken into account when coaching one's self.

                 

                And as the title espouses, it covers all race distances and offers training plan schedules for each distance. These are to be used as a framework and adapted per each individuals needs, again, the book explains how to better understand what your body is telling you.

                 

                For myself, I foresee a fair bit of time before I'm able to fully implement the many different pieces, but it's given me a starting place and a lot to consider.

                  To the OP: if you ran a 30' 10k at age 47, this would be very close to a world record for your age group. By the time you were fit enough to run a world record, you would be at least 55, and this sort of time would be well beyond the world record for 55 year olds. So, yeah, be ambitious, but I think that you ought to be careful not to get ahead of yourself.

                   

                  A 1:15 half marathon is more possible for you, but this would be something that would likely take 5 or 6 years of focused and disciplined training at a very high level to achieve.

                   

                  I like the Hudson "Run Faster" book. Another good book is Daniels' "Running Formula." Too much theoretical knowledge in advance of practical knowledge can also be somewhat dangerous. Most of what you learn in training is not found in books. Smile

                    A 1:15 half marathon is more possible for you,

                     

                    Um...okay.

                    Runners run.

                      Um...okay.

                       

                      Well, in my defense, "more possible" than "totally freaking crazy to even mention it" isn't saying much.


                      Not A Runner

                        Run Faster from the 5K to the Marathon  

                         

                        it covers all race distances

                         

                        What about the 100 meter and 100 mile?  I'm thinking about trying to hold age group American records in both simultaneously.  

                        I want to do it because I want to do it.  -Amelia Earhart

                          What about the 100 meter and 100 mile?  I'm thinking about trying to hold age group American records in both simultaneously.  

                           

                          There's a kind of logic about grouping 5k -> marathon together - at least at the elite level. Those distances are aerobic aerobic, and can be done (for at least some people) on stored glycogen. 

                          xor


                            Do advanced runners need books?

                             

                            xor


                              There's a kind of logic about grouping 5k -> marathon together - at least at the elite level. Those distances are aerobic aerobic, and can be done (for at least some people) on stored glycogen. 

                               

                              Aerobic Aerobic.

                               

                              I went to junior high with Todd Todd.

                               

                              I'm down with the 100m/100mi grouping.

                               

                                Aerobic Aerobic.

                                  

                                 

                                Ah - I think I meant to write "essentially aerobic"...

                                12