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where to begin with cross training (Read 1046 times)

run4fun8910


    Hi. So this is my eighth week of running. I am addicted to the running part and am looking forward to a lifetime of running. Here is the hard part. What to do on the days off. I know the answer. Cross train. In my case I need to work on my core. I have never done this. My core is not made of iron rather something a little closer to Jello. So where to start. How many days a week should I do core exercises. What exercise can I do as a biginner. Also I know that I need to do leg strength training to strengthen my quads and knees and you know all the other muscles in the legs. But I need to find exercises I can do at home. Going to a gym is not practical for me. How many times a week? Then I am assuming I should be doing some other cardio cross training? Does walking count? or is it to similar? I really want to become a fit runner. So I really appreciate any guidance you can throw my way. Thanks, Shawn
    Short term goal: 5K Long term goal: half marathon. Stay injury free. Shawn
      There will be a million different answers to this. Cross training can be used to do lots of different things- correct muscle imbalances, simulate running, just do stuff for fun, etc... I like to swim for xtraining, but others say biking is better for runners. I like the full body workout that swimming gives. For core, you may want to check out the latest (or last?) issue of runner's world. They had a bunch of core exercises that the elite US runners are doing. I also found this link http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/abdominalcorestrength1/a/Best_Ab_Ex.htm that I thought was interesting. I believe that you can exercise your abs every day, which is different than other types of strength training. I'm sure you'll get lots of other advice. Good luck with the half marathon goal-it is a great distance.

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      MissGiggles


        you could try yoga, it is a full body workout and recommended by many runners. Thats your core and a leg workout. Also biking and swimming are great cross training.
        run4fun8910


          I have thought about Yoga. But here is the problem. I need to find something I can cross train in at the same 5 AM time and I can not make it to a gym in time and get home, get ready and get my kids ready. I need something I can do at home. Can you safely do Yoga at home and if so does anyone have a recommendation for a good Yoga instructional DVD?
          Short term goal: 5K Long term goal: half marathon. Stay injury free. Shawn
            I've never done yoga, but I do pilates at home. It's a full body workout and doesn't take any equipment except for a yoga mat and maybe some little hand-held barbells. Every time I stop doing it for a while, then come back Smile, I swear I can feel the difference in muscle tone within a few weeks. Out of a couple of DVDs I've tried, I like "Pilates Complete for Weight Loss" the best by far -- it has different levels and lengths of workouts, and I find it easy to follow. (No affiliation, etc. etc.) http://www.amazon.com/Pilates-Complete-Interactive-Personal-Trainer/dp/B0000VLKVW/
            VictorN


              My only suggestion is to make sure you don't fill in your off days to the point where you aren't recovering. Easy cross training can help recovery, but don't overdo it. Remember, it is when you recover that your body grows stronger. Victor
              TexasRunner


                My only suggestion is to make sure you don't fill in your off days to the point where you aren't recovering. Easy cross training can help recovery, but don't overdo it. Remember, it is when you recover that your body grows stronger. Victor
                I'll second this. I was doing the FIRST program where I had a hard long run, hard tempo session, and an interval workout on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. On Monday, Wednesday, Friday, I was doing a hard 45-minute spin class. I survived about 8 weeks before my body said, "That's enough, Amigo." No matter what you decide to do, build into it gradually just like you did with your running. I had tweaked my achilles, so I decided to use a XC ski-type machine instead of a run. Being in good aerobic shape, I hammered hard for an hour. I could barely get out of bed the next couple of days because I had overused muscles that weren't used to working that hard.