1

Basics NEEDED (Read 1614 times)

    I have a folder of favorites sites for running that is large and getting larger. However most of the information seems geared to the old hats out there. I read my log and wonder what it all means. V02 Max? What number is good? Am I improving it? Am I entering my runs correctly? When is up hill a logged hill? Tempo runs? Intervals? Fartlek? (a funny word!!! About like the Thai word for the veggie squash..........hint F bomb) Long? How do I determine what distance is a long run for me? Easy? Easy for who? You see the problem? I have searched my favs and even googled a few terms and I end up knowing less than when I started.

    To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire

      Hi, Gregg. I can help with a couple of these... I think. Wink I've been running a little under a year, and don't use all these, but here's what I've learned so far: A tempo run is a run you do that's a little bit slower than your expected race pace. You're trying to hit a set time. I don't know the specifics, but I think it's generally somewhere around a minute/mile slower than your race pace. I don't use these, so I don't know much about them. Intervals are, I think, usually done on a track, but they don't have to be. My understanding is it's anything where you're repeating "faster" and "slower" on a regular basis. This lets you run "faster" faster than you normally could because you're recovering during "slower." It could be you run a hard 400 meters, then jog slowly for 400 meters to recover, and then repeat a few times. Another kind of intervals is run/walk with time. I use those sometimes - say, run pretty hard for 4 minutes, then walk for 1 minute, then repeat. I find I can maintain an overall faster pace when I walk 1 minute out of every 5 than if I'm running straight through! Fartlek's supposed to mean "speed play." You know you're a runner if you can say "fartlek" with a straight face... Wink Basically it means throwing in a little speed work here and there, keeping it simple, random, and fun. Like you're just running along, and say, "Let's sprint to that second mailbox" and then after you do that, you go back to running for a while, then "Push it hard to that corner there" and then back to normal and so on. It's not set, it's basically just mixing things up and it's supposed to be fun. "Long" would be, well, long for you. Smile Okay, to take an example, look at Mile Collector's log Wink He runs about the same distances and patterns every week. (Watch him start mixing it up now!) Every weekend you'll see one run that's roughly twice as long as the others. That's his "long" run. It's personal - one person's long run is another's walk-in-the-park. It's not a run that you do fast, it's just supposed to help you get and/or stay used to being on your feet for a long time and to help build up your endurance. Most advice I've seen says to make your long run in the neighborhood of about a third of your weekly milage. If you make it longer than that you're risking injury. Shorter than that, I guess, and it's not really that "long"... The people who use a "long" run in training would be your endurance runners - half-marathon, marathon, and up. Ultra-marathoners seem to train with two long runs back to back. Everyone else should take a day off after the long run in order to rest the body. Some people say you should take a day off before the long run as well! "Easy" is just that - easy for you. LOL! Some people's "easy" pace is the sprinting pace of other people. Again, it's personal. You'd use an "easy" run as a recovery run after a hard workout or a race or to just give your body a break. Generally speaking, these types of workouts (interval, hill, fartlek, tempo, etc) wouldn't be used by someone just starting out running or with a low milage base. They're interesting to learn about, but a newer runner's priority should be in gaining consistancy in training and building up a solid base. Try to run too fast too soon and you're just asking to get hurt. Hope that helps some. I'm sure others can tell you more! Janell

      Roads were made for journeys...

        Yep that helped! Right now I am running hit and miss due to weather. I was born and raised on the desert, Simi Valley and 13 inches of rain a year. Indiana gets that in a month or so. Currently I am shooting for a mile a day taking Mondays off for rest and running a HR of not more than that 75% of MHR. That is going to slow my pace a bit as I have been running just under 80% when I check. I just picked up the Omron HR 100C. Played with it some today and it was dead on with my blood pressure cuff. I figure that even in the heat and muggy weather if I run strictly in my target heart range and drink lots of water I should be just fine. That and I think I'll run in the part\k under trees. Of course getting my wife to believe I'll be OK is another story. I have been in the cardiact ward twice since 2001 and while doc says I OK NO heart attack, and gettng better I think there is a little part of her that just is not sure doc knows what he is talking about.

        To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire

          VO2 Max is the maximum amount of oxygen that an athlete can use during peak effort, expressed in ml per minute, per kg of body mass. The higher the number the better, but this site's estimate is likely way off so don't worry too much about the number you see there. The only way to know for sure what your VO2 Max is, is to get strapped into a bunch of tubes that measure your breathing an run hard on a treadmill at increasing speed and incline until you max out with a bunch of lab techies recording everything. You can estimate it from a race effort but it's never exact. The bottom line is you don't need to worry about it. I've been running since I was 14 and I don't know what my VO2 Max is. Advanced runners will do specific workouts to try and boost their VO2 Max when they are getting ready for races especially those in the 3k to 10k range. You don't need to know what your VO2 Max is to improve it--just doing the right workouts will do that. The longer the race, the less VO2 Max is a factor--in the marathon it's not important at all. For a beginner runner, any training at all will boost VO2 Max. There's no right or wrong way to enter info in your running log--its a matter of personal preference how much information you want to actually track. I do not use a lot of the features or the run type categories. On the other hand, I have some of my own categories that I added. I am mostly concerned with keeping track of distance and time over the long term. But it's also nice to see the run type, my weight, shoe mileage and my notes. I don't use the interval feature--when a workout includes intervals, I just put that information in the notes. Hills is another subjective category. Some people only would log "hills" if they did repeats up and down a hill. Others will call a run a "hill" run if its run on a hilly course. Its up to you. I tend to only log "hills" if I'm doing repeats on a particular hill. Janell has give good explanations of the major types of runs. I would just add that "easy" makes up the lions share of most runner's weekly mileage. For the time being, virtually all of your mileage likely should be in the "easy" category, even though it might not feel that easy some days. The term easy just means not run at a specific pace--just plain distance running. If you look at my log you'll see most of my days are easy--and even some of the ones not labeled "easy" contain a lot of easy running (warmups, cooldowns, recovery jogs between harder intervals, etc.) I've chosen to color code the little bar graph all in shades of blue with the darker color indicating harder efforts (Eric has included lots of cool little gizmos like that for us.) But usually when I look at my log, I use the calendar view, or the workouts view as it makes more sense to me that way. It's all personal preference. Keep on truckin, mike

          Runners run.

            Here's a short answer for why you would do each of the main types of runs (I just read Daniel's Running Formula). I hope this helps. Repitiion: >100% maxHR for short distance (200-400m). This works on stride efficiency and speed. My only advice, other than what Janell wrote, would be to take more time for recovery between reps. I would walk for a minute, then jog for at least 1-2 more minutes very easy before starting my next rep. Interval: 95-100% maxHR for up to 5 minutes at a time. This works on increasing VO2 max (Mike explained what this is). Threshold: 88-92% maxHR, usually no more than 20 minutes when starting these types of runs. These work on increasing your lactate threshold-- the amount of effort you can put out without lactic acid building up in your muscles). Easy pace: 65-79% maxHR. These develop your cardiovascular system. As mike said, the vast majority of running time should be in this zone. Most people describe this effort as a "conversational pace"-- you can run and talk without gasping for breath. Don't be afraid to keep your HR more around 70% -- as you keep training you'll be able to run faster at that same effort. For long runs I've heard anything from 25-33% of your weekly mileage, but I've done more if I didn't get much training in during the week.
              Poose, that pace of 65 to 79% is right where I have been runnibg. However that "easy conversational pace without gasping is not there yet! I huff and puff right now, but less than when I started. I call it my Jumanji Rino Phase. Funny but the last half mile seems to make for slightly easier breathing. And I think I'll reset the upper limit alarm on he HRM from 75% to 80% as that is where I have been at the finish in he past anyway. OK I think Sundays ae my longs runs, not that I'll try that tomorrow unless I feel good. This morning I stopped took my heart rate and jogged the .3 mile cool down as I really felt good. I may, now that I have the monitor just keep going if I fell as well at that point.

              To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire

                Here's a short answer for why you would do each of the main types of runs (I just read Daniel's Running Formula). I hope this helps. Repitiion: >100% maxHR for short distance (200-400m).
                Poose, I'm missing something here. I'm a very literal person, so help me understand this: how can you run at more than 100% of your maximum heart rate when your heart rate won't go any higher than its maximum?

                Roads were made for journeys...

                  I would just add that "easy" makes up the lions share of most runner's weekly mileage. For the time being, virtually all of your mileage likely should be in the "easy" category, even though it might not feel that easy some days. The term easy just means not run at a specific pace--just plain distance running. If you look at my log you'll see most of my days are easy--and even some of the ones not labeled "easy" contain a lot of easy running (warmups, cooldowns, recovery jogs between harder intervals, etc.) I've chosen to color code the little bar graph all in shades of blue with the darker color indicating harder efforts (Eric has included lots of cool little gizmos like that for us.) But usually when I look at my log, I use the calendar view, or the workouts view as it makes more sense to me that way. It's all personal preference.
                  Mike - you're right. Since I use a heart-rate monitor for most of my runs (landing them squarely in the "easy" category) I call them by that rather than "easy" but "easy" it is! I was thinking of the label of "easy" as more of a "recovery run" but really you're right it should be the bulk of most people's runs. Sorry for the confusion, Gregg!

                  Roads were made for journeys...

                    I ran heart rate this morning, set for 65% to 80% and it was too slow. I kept hearing the high end alarm and needing to slow down!! It slowed my pace to 12:53. Not much of a slow down, but there were times when it was a power walk and slow one at that to being my HR back into the target range. Is not the idea to run the distance? Well I did have a very short converstaion with a guy picking up his paper! And i didn't end up gasping for breath either.

                    To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire

                      Poose, I'm missing something here. I'm a very literal person, so help me understand this: how can you run at more than 100% of your maximum heart rate when your heart rate won't go any higher than its maximum?
                      haha, yeah, that seems to be a mistake -- I was doing the numbers from memory and should have checked-- I figured he meant >100% measured maxHR, which wouldn't necessarily be your physiological maxHR. I would put reps at 100% maxHR -- max effort with lots of recovery (3-4x the effort time). Gregg: I wouldn't worry about pace too much at this point. I might try alternating running and walking to extend the exercise time and keep your HR under control (5 min running, 2 walking and repeat 3x for example). When I first started using a HR monitor, I had to slow down. But, within ~2 months, I was back to the original pace and felt like I was hardly working.
                        I ran heart rate this morning, set for 65% to 80% and it was too slow. I kept hearing the high end alarm and needing to slow down!! It slowed my pace to 12:53. Not much of a slow down, but there were times when it was a power walk and slow one at that to being my HR back into the target range. Is not the idea to run the distance? Well I did have a very short converstaion with a guy picking up his paper! And i didn't end up gasping for breath either.
                        Actually, my understanding is if you have to walk in order to keep the HR within the zone, then you walk. No worries about it. With time, you get in better cardiovascular shape and will throw in more and more running until you're running all the time. For reference, when I started I had to drop my running pace from about 13:30 to about 20:00. Try running at a 20:00 mile! It's quite a challenge! I'm averaging around 18:00 now to keep it in zone when there are just very mild hills around, and have to walk to keep in zone when it's hilly. Know what? My running's still getting better even though I'm still having to throw walking in in order to stay in my training zone. You'll find there are a number of different really slow speeds. I've discovered: "weak bent-kneed shuffle," "medium bent-kneed shuffle," "strong bent-kneed shuffle," "easy jog," and "light-medium jog." Running like this is very hard on the pride. But it's good for the heart! Blush

                        Roads were made for journeys...

                          haha, yeah, that seems to be a mistake -- I was doing the numbers from memory and should have checked-- I figured he meant >100% measured maxHR, which wouldn't necessarily be your physiological maxHR. I would put reps at 100% maxHR -- max effort with lots of recovery (3-4x the effort time).
                          Thanks for the clarification.

                          Roads were made for journeys...

                          NetSapiens


                            Fartlek? (a funny word!!! About like the Thai word for the veggie squash..........hint F bomb)
                            Just thought I'd chime in, as I couldn't see this in the thread: Fartlek is actually a Swedish word (the Danish equivalent being Fartleg) Since English speaking people have problems with this and keeping a straight face, let me say that in Danish the "g" at the is pronounced as an "i" sound, making the word sound like "fartlai", i.e. no reference to appendages Smile and to help you keep a straight face, pronounce "fart" as "fa.t" (no, don't pronounce the period, just make a slight pause Smile ) So for language class today, learn to pronounce it: fa.t lake, and you're probably closer to Sweden than you think Smile The word Fart means literally: Speed, and Lek or leg does indeed mean play. i.e. (as has been stated already: speed play)
                            bas


                              I find it works best for me to ignore most of the running types that are offered. Basically I list everything above 5k as a long run, wether it was easy or not so easy. About once a week I train at my running club, and what they do there is mostly intervals so I list them as such. I skip warming ups, technical exercises and recoveries between intervals. Logging them doesn't help me to get the general picture of how my running is developing. And then there are races of course, but that is obvious. Every now and then I list 'easy runs' 'recovery runs' etc. but after a while I always forget about them. It will be different for other people, but for me the simple approach works best.

                              52° 21' North, 4° 52' East